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CuriosityCat: O Politician, behold The Shape of the Future

So, you’re a politician? You want to lead our country into a better future? You think the past cannot be relied on as an accurate predicator of the future of the country’s economy? You think the middle class deserve a better break than they’ve been given for the past decade or two? And you think Canada definitely has to move away from being simple hewers of wood and drawers of water, and move to the forefront of the next few waves of technological advances? Want some solid, take-it-to-the-bank, realistic ideas about where the most advanced economies are heading over the (Read more…)

CuriosityCat: Quebec: The separatist Premier who is committed and not committed

The Impartial Premier – Trust Me

Premier Pauline Marois believes she can have her cake and eat it, too. So she is sucking and blowing at the same time about whether a vote for her Parti Quebecois is really also a vote to start the journey to yet another referendum on independence for Quebec. It seems that she believes that if she is careful with her choice of words, she can achieve two things – square the circle, blow hot and cold, turn black into white – at the same time, without anyone noticing. Premier Marois’ Open Agenda: In today’s (Read more…) . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Quebec: The separatist Premier who is committed and not committed

CuriosityCat: Election 2015: The Crossing of the Curves

Andre Turcotte – the Curves Tracker

Sometimes a picture is really worth a thousand words, much to the consternation of the conservatives huddled in Ottawa for the annual Manning Centre rightwing navel-gazing gathering.  Pollster Turcotte presented a series of graphs showing what a poll of a thousand Canadians today think about the (Read more…) . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Election 2015: The Crossing of the Curves

Bryan Crockett: Reflections on a Year of Politics: 2013

For me as a Liberal, 2013 has been a fantastic year. The Liberal Party of Canada has truly been rebuilt, as evident by the fact that over 100 000 Canadians were engaged in the most open leadership race of any political party in Canadian history.

Our accomplishments in 2013 are vast: we elected a fantastic leader, we grew the party, and all of this rebuilding was done by the grassroots members of the party. Without them, the LPC wouldn’t have won several byelections this year, putting us in a good position for 2014, and the next general election.

But 2013 has (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: The Liberals’ Renaissance in Quebec.

Quebec’s federal and provincial Liberals appear to be enjoying something of a renaissance.  The Toronto Star’s Chantal Hebert figures the Trudeau Libs now give Mulcair’s New Dems’ Quebec-centric power base a serious challenge.

In an ever-expanding forest of positive polls for the Liberals, the latest CROP snapshot of Quebec public opinion stands out but not necessarily for the usual Justin Trudeau-related reasons.

…the poll suggests that Quebec is undergoing a Liberal revival, with both the federal and provincial parties in first place in voting intentions at 38 per cent.

Trudeau and Couillard are associated with a better-established brand than (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: Trudeau Wastes No Time in Showing His Hand

If the polls are right and Justin Trudeau’s Liberals manage to reclaim power from the Harper Cons in 2015 all signs are that Canada will continue to be governed on the principle of cynical opportunism.

The spinelessness of the Liberals in joining Harper on the undemocratic terrorism amendments and the FIPPA trade sellout to China suggests the Liberals will continue on the disastrous (for Canada) path charted by Ignatieff.

My suspicions that Justin is more Margaret than Pierre are confirmed.

Random Ranting Raving and Ratings: Torries want ability to Jail Canadians without Cause

The Senate Bill S-7 being debated at third reading today will give authorities the ability to detain people for up to 12 months even if they are not suspected of any crimes or potential crimes.  Mr. Sullivan MP for York-South Weston describes this best.

He said:

“ [The] individual is… ..

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Meet the new Libs. Same as the old Libs as far as I can tell.

With Justin Trudeau, its freshly minted leader, at the helm the renewed Liberal Party of Canada has already told me pretty much what I need to know.

Given the option of speaking out against a trade deal with China which would seriously hamper our ability to manage our own environment and economy and lock us in for 31 years, the Liberals have sided with Conservatives in support of FIPA. Apparently they think the deal can be made acceptable with some modifications. Remember Colombia?

And in other news, given the opportunity to stand up for civil liberties the Liberals were (Read more…) to remind us that it was Jean Chretien’s government that originally caved in to the panic following 9/11 and bravely implemented preventive arrest and so-called investigative hearings. So even though these measures were never used when in force and allowed to sunset five years ago, let’s, by all means, . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Meet the new Libs. Same as the old Libs as far as I can tell.

The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

Was in Ottawa for the leadership reveal, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog reflecting on the race. First off, let me thank all the volunteers and party staff who worked during the weekend and throughout the race.

While the obvious winner was Justin Trudeau, and congratulations to his team are due, I thought I’d write about who I think are the more subtle winners and losers from both the weekend and the race as a whole. Presented in no particular order.

WINNERS

-George Takach

Takach wasn’t taken the most seriously at the start of the race, but

. . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

Was in Ottawa for the leadership reveal, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog reflecting on the race. First off, let me thank all the volunteers and party staff who worked during the weekend and throughout the race.

While the obvious winner was Justin Trudeau, and congratulations to his team are due, I thought I’d write about who I think are the more subtle winners and losers from both the weekend and the race as a whole. Presented in no particular order.

WINNERS

-George Takach

Takach wasn’t taken the most seriously at the start of the race, but

. . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

somecanuckchick dot com: Coronations are not held after 104,552 votes are counted…

Coronations are not held after 104,552 votes are counted, nor are coronations held in hotel conference rooms. *COUGH*

Congratulations/Félicitations Justin Trudeau!

SCC

The Equivocator: Hard Work + Hope = Why I voted for Justin Trudeau

The leadership results are coming in the next hour. I am so proud of my party. Over 104, 000 people voted for Liberal leader which is more than voted in the last Conservative Party and NDP leadership races! So here is a quick post on why I voted for Justin Trudeau for Liberal Leader:

1. Justin can grow into the job:

Justin Trudeau has grown as a politician throughout this leadership race. In 1996 the Ontario Liberals seemed to have hit the bottom. They picked a young guy who hadn’t been in politics for too long (who also had a father

. . . → Read More: The Equivocator: Hard Work + Hope = Why I voted for Justin Trudeau

The Liberal Scarf: Follow me on Twitter for coverage of the Liberal leadership showcase tomorrow

I’ll be livetweeting the showcase (I nearly typed convention out of a force of habit left over from OLP leadership) so follow me on Twitter at @WilliamNorman.

Bryan Crockett: Liberals. We’re big on policy.

This past weekend, at the Liberal Party of Canada in British Columbia policy conference, we passed many important progressive policy resolutions. Instead of doing the typical partisan thing and talking about just how great we are, I’ll highlight a few of the policies that I’m excited about.

PROTECTING THE RIGHTS OF SEX TRADE WORKERS The courts have regularly ruled that prostitution is legal. Making laws to deter prostitution does nothing to actually stop it, puts people’s lives in danger, and costs a tremendous amount to taxpayers. I’m proud that this resolution passed because it means that, upon a new Liberal

. . . → Read More: Bryan Crockett: Liberals. We’re big on policy.

The Disaffected Lib: Vancouver Islanders Have Spoken

Vancouver Island’s round of  faux public hearings into the proposed Northern Gateway bitumen pipeline have wrapped up.   The panel heard 253 presentations.

When they were done, the tally was 253 opposed edging out 0 in support of the supertanker initiative.   That’s 253 to nil.   Sort of gives you an idea of what awaits the island’s Conservative MPs in the next federal election.   Liberals need take no comfort in the Tories’ plight.  It’s a safe bet that ridings on the island and coastal mainland will be divvied up between the Greens and the NDP.

Then again,

The Disaffected Lib: Is Canadian Progressivism a Farce?

The topic came up recently in a discussion I had with a prolific and thoroughly progressive blogger who will go unnamed.   He lamented that he had become fed up with Canadian prog bloggers who seemed not terribly interested in progressivism at all and, by contrast, far less interesting than their truly progressive American counterparts.

I think his criticism is fair and accurate.   Many of us, I suspect, consider ourselves progressive by virtue of an affiliation with a particular party that once, in times now past, had been more or less actually progressive.   For them, progressivism was a

. . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Is Canadian Progressivism a Farce?

Politics and Entertainment: The Agonizing Challenge of Voting in 2015

“If voting changed anything, they’d make it illegal.” – Emma Goldman

There’s been much talk of late about uniting the main opposition parties in some sort of delusional effort to defeat the Harper Regime come the next faux election either as a one-time strategic plan or by way of a more long term relationship.  Here’s a reality check for those fantasizing about such a possibility.

1) First of all, not one of the parties is really progressively left, though all three like to spin that they are when it suits them, especially if they espouse support for social programs. (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: Just a Few Questions for the Liberal Party of Canada

How long can the Liberal Party duck the fundamental issue of climate change and what it means to our country, to our people and to our world?   Here are a few questions I’d like the party and those vying for its leadership to consider and ans… . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Just a Few Questions for the Liberal Party of Canada

The Equivocator: Vote Harvey Locke: The Progressive Choice for Calgary-Centre

Today (November 26th) is by-election day in the great riding of Calgary-Centre! The Liberal campaign has been as exciting as it has been improbably and for the first time since 1968, Calgary-Centre might such send a Liberal to Ottawa. Though … Continue reading . . . → Read More: The Equivocator: Vote Harvey Locke: The Progressive Choice for Calgary-Centre

The Disaffected Lib: If Canadians Want a Liberal, It Won’t be Mulcair

Sorry Dippers, your guy is a liberal and Canadians’ Liberal of choice is the guy whose hair is on his head, not his face.NatPo’s latest poll finds if Canadians had a chance to vote today, they would elect a strong Liberal minority government led by Tru… . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: If Canadians Want a Liberal, It Won’t be Mulcair

Bryan Crockett: How I Became Involved in Politics

For as long as I can remember, I’ve always been taking a stand for what I feel is right. While, in my younger years, this was often protesting my brother being allowed to do things that I wasn’t, it eventually shifted to more political issues. This was definitely not instilled or inspired by my parents, however, as my Mom was (and remains, despite my best efforts) rather apolitical, and my Dad was a hypocritical and ideological unionist who didn’t understand the implications of his actions, and especially didn’t understand the consequences of his vote.

As I’ve grown up, and become more and

. . . → Read More: Bryan Crockett: How I Became Involved in Politics

Trashy's World: To all of those Con and Dipper detractors…

… who screeched that the Premier of Ontario was but a power-crazed coward for resigning his post, I say: HA! Turns out he only wants to spend more time with his family. And whether you’re a pol, fireman, clerk, lawyer, doctor, teacher or public servant, more time with one’s family is something we all want, [...]

Trashy's World: What does the most successful Premier in Ontario’s history…

… do for an encore? I, like everyone, was shocked by the premier’s resignation yesterday. So, what’s next for my MPP? Is he going to throw his hat into the federal ring in an effort to lead the LPC? I for one, and as a Liberal, hope so. I think he would make a great [...]

The Disaffected Lib: The Youngest Old Man in the Liberal Party

The Ottawa Citizen’s Sue Riley looks at Justin Trudeau and sees the youngest old man in a Liberal Party full of old men.

…The Liberal leadership hopeful’s much-anticipated launch speech last week was disappointingly banal. He ran through the familiar Liberal checklist: a nod to strength in diversity, the Charter of Rights, Quebec’s central role, First Nations poverty and so on.

Overall, the speech contained not one fresh idea or memorable quote, although the former high school drama teacher strove mightily to impart depth, quoting his father, who was quoting Paul to the Corinthians, about putting away “childish things.”

. . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: The Youngest Old Man in the Liberal Party

CuriosityCat: Globalization’s Discontents: Maude Barlow, the Hollow Men, and the Conversation that’s just beginning

Brian ‘Hollow Man’ Mulroney

Brain Mulroney was boasting about his magnificent act in getting the US-Canada free trade agreement signed. What he did not talk about – and probably does not realize – is that he is one the Hollow Men: those who, consciously or unconsciously, set about hollowing out the industrial heartland of Canada and America. The Hollow Men favoured globalization and its means, free trade agreements (as opposed to fair trade agreements), as a way to enrich corporations and  shareholders, while helping workers in poorer countries to find jobs in the many factories that were relocated there . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Globalization’s Discontents: Maude Barlow, the Hollow Men, and the Conversation that’s just beginning