Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Evening Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Linda McQuaig discusses the hollow promise of “populist” billionaires who ultimately serve only to enrich themselves and their class. And Lana Payne writes about the growing protest movement which culminated in massive rallies around the world this weekend – as well as the causes of its emergence: Over ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Jared Bernstein argues that the limited stimulus provided by tax cuts for the rich is far from worth the overall costs of exacerbating inequality and damaging public revenues: I’m encountering progressives who are compelled to be at least somewhat supportive of wasteful, regressive tax cuts, like those proposed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne points out the significance of even central bankers like Mark Carney recognizing the desperate need to combat inequality. And Iglika Ivanova discusses how British Columbia’s election-year surplus represents a wasted opportunity to start addressing the social problems which the Libs have been exacerbating for a decade ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne comments on the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that economic growth translates into benefits for workers: The findings of a study released this month by the Canadian Centre for Study of Living Standards, an Ottawa-based think-tank, reinforces why there is a “pervasive sense among ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Arancha González Laya distinguishes between international trade and corporatism – arguing that we should be looking to ensure people benefit from the former by reining in the latter: Making trade more inclusive requires action on three broad policy fronts: trade rules, domestic social protection, and international cooperation to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – The Star’s editorial board writes that while we can do more to provide supports to make workers less dependent on a single job, we shouldn’t pretend there’s nothing we can do to improve working conditions. And Lana Payne reminds Morneau and the Libs that there’s nothing inevitable about ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Ellen Gould comments on how the CETA and other trade deals constrain democratic governance – and the fact that corporate bigwigs are threatening any government which considers giving effect to popular opposition doesn’t exactly provide any comfort. Meanwhile, Scott Sinclair points out the dangerous effects of the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Larry Elliott writes that the public is rightly frustrated with an economic model designed to shift money to those who already have the most – and that progressive parties in particular need to offer a meaningful alternative: The belief on the left was that 2008 sounded the death ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Rachel West charts how higher wages and improved social supports can reduce crime rates and their resulting costs. – Lana Payne comments on the glass ceiling still limiting the wages and opportunities available to women in the workplace. And Stephanie Langton highlights how a combination of student loan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Lana Payne comments on the combination of low wages and nonexistent security attached to jobs for younger workers. And Catherine Baab-Muguira examines the spread of the side hustle economy as a means of bare survival. – Roderick Benns discusses how the isolation of remote communities represents a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne discusses how inequality and insecurity inevitably serve as the key explanation for the rise of right-wing populism. And Adam Johnson rightly challenges the theory being presented by some that the answer to expressions of frustration by people left out of policy decision-making is to restrict democracy ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jeremy Smith argues that the Brexit vote result should serve as a compelling reminder of the dangers of neoliberalism. John Hood focuses on inequality in particular as a driving force behind the willingness of voters to leave the European Union, while Mike Carter points out the connection between ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Ed Finn comments on the history of neoliberalism – but notes that while the public is rightly skeptical of corporate spin, that awareness hasn’t yet translated into a strong alternative: (S)cores of well-known thinkers, writers, economists, and activists have vociferously denounced the many abuses of large business empires ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Martin Lukacs highlights the Canadian public’s broad support for the Leap Manifesto – and the opportunity available to any party willing to put its contents into practice. And Shawn Katz is hopeful that the NDP will seize the opening. But Bill Tieleman points out that the best intentions ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne writes about the need for a Bernie Sanders in Canada to highlight and oppose the privilege of the wealthy few: It is in this context of blatant unfairness — rules for the rich and rules for the rest — that politicians like Bernie Sanders have become ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning LInks

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Peter Moskowitz highlights why we shouldn’t be counting on crowdfunding or other private sources to address social needs. And Lana Payne calls out the attitude of entitlement on the part of the wealthy which has bled our public sector dry. – Meanwhile, Rob Gillezeau points out the Libs’ ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Sarah Anderson, Marc Bayard, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Josh Hoxie and Sam Pizzigati offer an outline as to how to fight back against growing inequality: § We need to see inequality as a deep systemic problem. Piecemeal interventions have not helped slow or reverse the pace of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Richard Eskow summarizes the basic facts about inequality in the U.S. Ta-Nehisi Coates argues that it’s impossible to fully explain or address that problem without factoring in ongoing racial disparities. And Sean Trembath writes about James Daschuk’s work in tracing health disparities among indigenous peoples back to Canada’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne highlights how Kevin O’Leary’s obliviousness to inequality makes him a relic. But Linda McQuaig notes that however distant O’Leary may be from the public, he’s not that far removed from all too many Conservatives. – Gerald Caplan points out that even a campaign where the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne reminds us that wealth will never be fairly distributed without public action to ensure it doesn’t get concentrated with the lucky few: More and more of the income pie is going to the top one per cent — who are soaking up a bigger and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne discusses Jordan Brennan’s research showing that corporate tax cuts have done nothing to help economic growth (but all too much to exacerbate inequality). And Andrew Jackson sets out the main fiscal choice the Libs will have to make in determining whether to keep going down the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Kaylie Tiessen offers some important lessons from Ontario’s child poverty strategy – with the most important one being the importance of following through. And Christian Ledwell encourages Prince Edward Island’s MPs to lead a push toward a basic income, while PressProgress calls out the Fraser Institute for trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne points out that even some of the world’s wealthiest individuals are highlighting the need for governments to step up in addressing major collective action problems such as climate change and inequality. And Angella MacEwen offers one important example of that principle being put into practice, writing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Lana Payne surveys some of the glaring warning signs about the Trans-Pacific Partnership for anybody who thinks a government’s job is to further the interests of citizens rather than corporations: These deals are no longer about free trade. Rather, as I pointed out in my last column, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Steven Chase notes that the Cons’ promise to let Canadian know the details of the Trans-Pacific Partnership before they vote was broken with unusual speed and publicity. Michael Geist points out that we do know enough about the TPP to be sure it puts our privacy at risk, ...