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Canadian Dimension: Organising to Win: Direct Action Wins at Frite Alors!

A lot of the labour movement knows that there are serious problems with the way unions have developed in Canada. If you say “we rely too much on the grievance procedure,” people will nod sagely. If you say “we need to find a way to get back to our roots and use organization . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Organising to Win: Direct Action Wins at Frite Alors!

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Hassan Yussuff and other labour leaders offer their take on how we can develop a more equitable global trade system: The next challenge before us is to build on and improve all post-CETA trade and investment deals to ensure they meet a progressive trade model. We suggest several . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Eshe Nelson interviews Richard Baldwin about the future of globalization and the possibility that the worst disruptions to workers are just beginning: What happens to the chart on global income distribution during this phase of globalization? It keeps going down. It will be disruptive in the G7, but . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– David MacDonald examines how Canada’s tax expenditures systematically favour higher-income individuals over the people who actually have a reasonable claim to public support: This study finds that Canada’s personal income tax expenditures disproportionately benefit the rich and cost the federal treasury nearly as much as it collects in . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Thomas Frank writes that a progressive party can only expect to succeed if it places principles of equality and workers’ interests at the core of everything it does – rather than serving mostly as the voice of a wealthy professional class: Somewhere in a sunny corner of the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Miles Corak asks how we should see the growing concentration of income at the top of the spectrum, and concludes that we should be concerned mostly with the breakdown between personal merit and success among the extremely privileged: Connections matter. And for the top earners this might even . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Janice Fine discusses how the decline of organized labour as a political force has opened the door for the likes of Donald Trump: Just when we need them most, the main institutions that have fought for decent jobs are a shadow of their former selves. Unions that . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Lana Payne comments on the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that economic growth translates into benefits for workers: The findings of a study released this month by the Canadian Centre for Study of Living Standards, an Ottawa-based think-tank, reinforces why there is a “pervasive sense among . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– The Star argues that Canada can’t afford to leave tax loopholes wide open for the rich – as the Libs are doing in violation of their campaign promises. And Martin Lukacs notes that obscene giveaways to the rich seem to be the top priority for Justin Trudeau . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Evening Links

Canadian Dimension: Young workers: An “entitled” generation without entitlements

Photo by Fred Chartrand/CP

Every generation seems to think that those who come after are broken in some way: that they are disrespectful, lazy or aimless. But such comments on young Canadians todays are taking place in the context of a notable societal shift, where many expect lower standards of living than their . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Young workers: An “entitled” generation without entitlements

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Thomas Piketty discusses our choice between developing models of global trade which actually produce positive results for people, or fueling the fire of Trump-style demogoguery: The main lesson for Europe and the world is clear: as a matter of urgency, globalization must be fundamentally re-oriented. The main challenges . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Canadian Dimension: Ford Unifor Agreement Ratified: Voted Down at Oakville Unit, Local 707

Photo from Windsorite.ca

As bargaining between Unifor and the Canadian branches of the Detroit Three automakers came down to the last company, Ford, the signs were pointing to an emerging resistance to decades of concessions. Amid general opposition on the shop floor, leaders at the biggest Ford local were openly opposing the pattern . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Ford Unifor Agreement Ratified: Voted Down at Oakville Unit, Local 707

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Karl Nerenberg examines new research from the Canadian Centre for the Study of Living Standards showing how workers have seen hardly any benefit from four decades of productivity gains which have filled corporate coffers: (I)n Canada, the productivity of labour — the amount workers produce per unit of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Arancha González Laya distinguishes between international trade and corporatism – arguing that we should be looking to ensure people benefit from the former by reining in the latter: Making trade more inclusive requires action on three broad policy fronts: trade rules, domestic social protection, and international cooperation to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

The Disaffected Lib: Robert Reich Calls For a What? A "New Democratic Party" Whatever That Is.

During the campaign, Robert Reich urged American progressives to hold their noses and vote for Hillary. He also said that, the day after the election, they should mobilize, perhaps around Bernie Sanders, to create a new progressive movement, one that could challenge both the Republicans and the Democrats in 2020. Well that day has . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Robert Reich Calls For a What? A "New Democratic Party" Whatever That Is.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Anthony Hilton writes that stronger protections for workers tend to increase productivity. And Fiona McQuarrie makes clear that we don’t have to settle for an economy where workers face constant fear and insecurity as a result of precarious work: (J)ob churn and precarious employment incur other costs. High . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Canadian Dimension: Orgreave: Winning the battle means winning the war

Photo by Rex Shutterstock

Last week, British Home Secretary Amber Rudd dismissed a thirty-year campaign for an official inquiry into the events of the 1984 Battle of Orgreave, where police violently clashed with picketing miners at a coking plant in the north of England.

Despite evidence that the violence was instigated by the . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Orgreave: Winning the battle means winning the war

Canadian Dimension: Basic income: libertarian wedge or a plank towards a socialist future?

Photo from BasicIncome.org

In recent years, the popularity of a basic Income (BI), has grown. Fittingly, the topic has garnered thoughtful debate and analysis from across the Canadian left, including in the Summer 2016 issue of Canadian Dimension, where the concept was explored both as potential policy, but also as part of a . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Basic income: libertarian wedge or a plank towards a socialist future?

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Neil Irwin examines one of the key ideas underlying the U.S. Democrats’ economic plans, being that workers need to have meaningful choices rather than being trapped by a limited and slanted set of available employers and work structures: Labor market monopsony is the idea that when there isn’t . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– John McDonnell outlines a progressive alternative to neoliberal economic policy: The increasing automation of jobs, reduced dependence on carbon fuels, artificial intelligence and the so-called gig economy have provoked understandable anger among many workers whose jobs are under threat. More generally, concerns about the effect on the labour market are . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– George Monbiot rightly makes the point that a general attitude of kindness is a must for a functioning society – while lamenting that anything of the sort is all too often lacking from public policy choices.

– James Di Fiore discusses Justin Trudeau’s failed attempt at a triangulation . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Canadian Dimension: Unifor and Big Three Bargaining

Photo by CCPA Monitor • Unifor President Jerry Dias at Social Forum rally outside Canadian War Museum.

In his essay of October 17, 2016, “Big Three Bargaining: Different Ways of Making History,” Sam Gindin provides an intriguing analysis of current negotiations between Unifor and the Detroit Three automakers. Beyond agreeing with his points . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Unifor and Big Three Bargaining

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– The Star’s editorial board writes that while we can do more to provide supports to make workers less dependent on a single job, we shouldn’t pretend there’s nothing we can do to improve working conditions. And Lana Payne reminds Morneau and the Libs that there’s nothing inevitable about . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Thomas Walkom writes that the federal Libs’ idea of “real change” for the economy reflects nothing more than the same old stale neoliberal playbook: At its core, the federal government’s “bold” new plan for economic growth is strikingly familiar.

The scheme, worked out by Finance Minister Bill . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links