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Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Jim Tankersley interviews Joshua Bivens about the relative effects of economic growth and income inequality – and particularly his evidence showing that more people are far better off with more modest growth fairly d… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: Remembrances Of Things Past (And Present)

I suspect it is only the very young and the profoundly naive who believe that justice is blind, that all are treated equaly under the law. While a pleasing fiction that governments like to perpetuate, nothing could be further from the truth.Consider th… . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Remembrances Of Things Past (And Present)

Alberta Diary: Alberta Health Services to be run from Vancouver Island? Top 99 execs to get bonuses after all?

Alberta Health Services CEO Chris Eagle, Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne and AHS Administrative Officer Janet Davidson at yesterday’s press conference in Edmonton.

Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne began the day yesterday explaining why he may not be able to prevent Alberta Health Services’ 99 top managers from getting their controversial bonuses – . . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Alberta Health Services to be run from Vancouver Island? Top 99 execs to get bonuses after all?

The Canadian Progressive: F-35 Jet Fiasco: Harper Conservatives Heavily Monitored Public Perception

Under Prime Minister Stephen Harper and the Conservatives, Canada is fast becoming a real “surveillance state”. One that obsessively monitors critics of public policy and government action… and the “tone” of what these critics say. The Ottawa Citizen gives us a glimpse into the Harper government’s emerging heart of darkness. Yesterday, it reported: “Opposition parties . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: F-35 Jet Fiasco: Harper Conservatives Heavily Monitored Public Perception

The Disaffected Lib: Prepping Business for a Turbulent Environmental Future

‘Business as usual’ is on the way out.   And that warning is coming from global consulting giant KPMG.

Business is finally recognising what Buddhists have taught for thousands of years and development NGOs have struggled with for decades – that everything is connected and no problem can be effectively dealt with in isolation.

Systems . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Prepping Business for a Turbulent Environmental Future

How The Globe channels the 1 per cent | #Occupy #classwarfare

Managing Occupy protest cost city $1-million, city says – The Globe and Mail:

‘via Blog this’

It’s masquerading as “objective” “news,” but in fact it’s anything but.

Note how Canada’s National Fishwrap steers the discourse: the whole story is about how much money the city of Vancouver had to spend “managing” the protest. The . . . → Read More: How The Globe channels the 1 per cent | #Occupy #classwarfare

Carbon49 - a blog on sustainability for Canadian businesses: Integrated Reporting: Experiences from KPMG, PwC, Experts, Practitioners

What is integrated reporting? What are the benefits and what’s involved in its adoption? We survey views from PricewaterhouseCoopers, KPMG, and talked to Michael Krzus, the author of One Report: Better Strategy through Integrated Reporting. Joanne Westwood of Vancity shared with us their practical experiences. . . . → Read More: Carbon49 – a blog on sustainability for Canadian businesses: Integrated Reporting: Experiences from KPMG, PwC, Experts, Practitioners

RedBedHead: Tories $20 Million Auditors Are Serial Fraudsters

If you’re the government and you want to find “gravy” – to pick a random metaphor – that you can eliminate in the provision of services in order to reduce the deficit, what do you do? Why, you hire an auditor of course. An auditor has specially traine… . . . → Read More: RedBedHead: Tories $20 Million Auditors Are Serial Fraudsters

the reeves report: Toronto mulls deep service cuts to begin meeting $774M budget shortfall

In the effort to reduce a budget shortfall of $774M in the City of Toronto, we may find that the city our forebears worked so hard to create will be drained of its essence. After promising in the 2010 mayoral election that taxes would be cut and services would be left alone – that tired … Continue reading » . . . → Read More: the reeves report: Toronto mulls deep service cuts to begin meeting $774M budget shortfall

Railroaded by Metrolinx: Playing with Team Ford

“It is clear that there is a program to eliminate the public from our great city.”

– Kim Fry, the 11th deputant during the Core Service Review at Toronto’s City Hall on Thursday July 28

For a penny-pinching populist, Mayor Rob Ford’s policies are very expensive. Since his October 25th election, he has spent over $533 million in a strange sibling rivalry against his arch nemesis, ex-Mayor David Miller. During Miller’s time in office, Rob Ford was the least respected councillor, and was relegated to the benches during Miller’s confabs with his handpicked, executive council. In retaliation, cribbing from his tactics as high school football coach, Ford has crafted his defensive lineup – an executive council of six strong ‘yes’ men to systematically take apart Toronto’s public infrastructure – which Miller intended to be his legacy – through cutting core services. Ford is like a younger kid brother knocking down the carefully placed building blocks of his brother’s toy castle because he does not know how to build a city of his own design or imagination.

Select items from a spreadsheet itemizing Mayor Ford’s expenses to the City of Toronto? Canceling Transit City, initial penalties of $179 million, removing bike lanes, $469,000, bailing out an under-used arena, $43.4 million, subsidizing an underused ski lift in the ward of his ally, Councillor James Pasternak, $2 million, and the loss of revenue from the Land Transfer Tax and Vehicle Registration Tax, $204 million and $50 million respectively. Another $100,000 was spent to hire a TTC consultant, and $3 million to hire KPMG, an external consulting firm- both of these expenses are part of city councillor’s jobs, and so are redundant.

While ex-Mayor Miller left a $375 million surplus, Mayor Ford is dangerously close to spending money equivalent to the $774 million budget deficit he wanted to balance by 2012. Left unchecked, these expenditures will almost double the projected 2011 deficit within his first year of office, showing the true cost of privatization. With over three years left in his term, he huddles with his brother, Doug, as his closest advisor, quietly strategizing during City Council meetings, cautioned by his rightwing consultants to remain tightlipped with the media.

Ford’s first agenda item was to hire consultancy firm, KPMG, to perform a core service review. When KPMG’s results were made public, the results backfired for Team Ford. 96% of services are mandated by the federal government, there was no gravy, and the report unintentionally highlighted that the previous surplus left by ex-Mayor Miller was an act of financial wizardry. Apparently, the left can be bean counters, too.

On July 28th, there were over 300 deputations at City Hall on the agenda, with irate citizens decrying these cuts, and police at the council chamber’s door; the new executive council will make the final decision regarding these core service cuts in September. Bowing under thousands of emails of public pressure to attend the deputations- Mayor Ford did not sit in for the first round – he decreed that they take place over a marathon 20 hours. The deputations have become a kangaroo court, a sham procedure, to get them out of the way of his city fire sale, as ‘efficiencies’ are found, cutting core services from the elderly, children, those with HIV, caretakers, bicyclists, and at risk youth, including a program that funds 685 student nutrition programs, 42 AIDS prevention projects and 38 community drug prevention programs. Although police refused access to City Hall’s green roof for his picnic, activist Dave Meslin is part of hundreds attending a City Hall slumber party tonight; internationally, other cities are taking over squares to protest similar austerity measures.

By pitting the KPMG report against community deputations, Team Ford has deliberately polarized the downtown core against suburbanites. Call it ‘wedge politics’, ‘culture wars’ or ‘divide and conquer’, it is a tactic used to distract GTA citizens as hard won public assets are sold off to invisible bidders. Think of the Canadian version of Koch Brothers as high school football coaches, rather than democratic mayors, with transit at the center of the debate.

Ex-Mayor Miller’s legacy was to be Transit City, a light rail network designed to add street level connectivity and make workplaces accessible for outer neighbourhoods; Team Ford proposes to bring another football team and football stadium to downtown Toronto, and extend a Sheppard subway line to nowhere. ‘Austerity will not be pretty’, read a sign at the KPMG protest, but for Team Ford, stadiums, subways and athletes are certainly more important than transit, bicycle lanes, and ‘bike people’, as we are called by Councillor Doug Holyday. For the right, bike lanes are easily sacrificed on the altar of the Almighty Car, and traffic lanes and parking lots are held to be places of worship.

On July 12th, over three hundred bicyclists converged on City Hall, to ask that the newly installed Jarvis bicycle paths remain in place. Used by 890 riders daily, the bike paths connected the east end of the city with the west. Wearing bicycle helmets, and raising silently waving ‘jazz hands’ to show support for councilors arguing for their right to share lanes of traffic, a heated discussion in City Council raged over two days. Central to the debate were these questions- are bicyclists considered worthy of protection? Is Jarvis Street a cultural corridor or highway? And can a lane on Sherbourne Street, 400 m away, be considered sufficient, or do bicyclists have the right to be integrated as part of a citywide network with multiple options of bike routes?

Councillor Shelley Carroll argued that bicyclists will use Jarvis Street anyway, and modes of transport cannot be forbidden under the Highway Transport Act. Councillor Glenn De Baeremaeker said, “I think cyclists should start suing the city when struck by cars given this council’s recorded indifference to our safety.” Every seven hours a bicyclist is hit in the City of Toronto.

Finally, in procedural chaos, City Council voted that the Jarvis lanes were slated to be removed in two years upon the completion of the segregated Sherbourne lanes. A calculated, last minute motion by Councillor Giorgio Mammoliti re-added the reverse fifth lane, to render the prior Environmental Assessment and consultations null and void. Feisty Councillor Kristyn Wong-Tam objected to the last minute amendment by Mammoliti about the lanes in her Ward; rightwing partisan Speaker Nunziata allowed the motion, and eight left leaning councillors walked out upon learning that they will be unable to vote upon the bike plan item by item in the future. The final blow – City staff told Wong-Tam, who is lesbian, that returning the reversible centre lane to Jarvis would cost $570,000, more than 4 times the city grant to Pride, an event which also takes place in her Ward, and is next on the chopping block. (For a detailed discussion of the vote, link here.)

Upon hearing this verdict, ever-ingenious Dave Meslin, the founder of the Toronto Bicyclist’s Union, posted a Facebook call out for riders to take back Jarvis. Two days later, 1100 respectful bicyclists, ringing their bells, circled Jarvis Street to Church Street and rode to City Hall chanting “We just want to share.” As I rode my bike down Queen Street West, an onlooker called out “Pay some taxes”, a byproduct of the new nastiness now made publicly permissible by Torontonians modeling the behaviour of our Mayor, and his allies, toward bicyclists.

In his nine months in office, Mayor Ford has shown preferential treatment for his constituents. He prefers car-drivers over bicyclists, the suburban elite over the downtown intelligentsia, the very wealthy over the marginalized, and corporations over unions. He cannot walk several minutes from his office to a podium to read a brief speech for the flag raising ceremony of Pride; he attends Caribana instead to show that while he may be homophobic, he is not racist. He makes his preferences known by picking and choosing which events to attend, and which deputations to listen to, and when frustrated by community consultation, changes access to democratic process by changing the date of motions, or by running an all-night deputation session, so that the public cannot attend, or hand signaling a councillor to add a last minute motion to stymie progressive motions.

Inappropriately, Mayor Ford has used his office to discriminate against those who are most defenseless, and in need of defense- whether bicyclists or marginalized groups. Ford as a football coach, if not as a democratic mayor, should rise to the challenge of inclusive policymaking, if he wishes to remain in his position. So should his brother, Doug. Going forward, we need to be Team Toronto, not Team Ford.

With special thanks to the blog ‘Driving the Porcelain Bus’ for the expense breakdown of Mayor Ford.

References:
‘Driving the Porcelain Bus’ at http://drivingtheporcelainbus.blogspot.com
Robyn Doolittle, Toronto Star, Urban Affairs Reporter, ‘Critics see KPMG report as ‘smoke and mirrors’ at http://www.thestar.com/news/torontocouncil/article/1028588–critics-see-kpmg-report-as-smoke-and-mirrors
Matt Elliott, ‘Ford for Toronto’, ‘The Jarvis vote: What the hell happened?’ at
http://fordfortoronto.mattelliott.ca/2011/07/13/the-jarvis-vote-what-the-hell-happened/ . . . → Read More: Railroaded by Metrolinx: Playing with Team Ford

Railroaded by Metrolinx: Playing with Team Ford

“It is clear that there is a program to eliminate the public from our great city.” – Kim Fry, the 11th deputant during the Core Service Review at Toronto’s City Hall on Thursday July 28

For a penny-pinching populist, Mayor Rob Ford’s policies are very expensive. Since his October 25th election, he has spent over . . . → Read More: Railroaded by Metrolinx: Playing with Team Ford

Ford Puppet Shows His Contempt For Constituents

As many Torontonians would know, today is the day City Council is having a meeting with constituents to discuss cutting ‘gravy’. Poor long suffering Giorgio Mammoliti, he apparently is longing for his pillow and blanky. He’s not a happy camper, to say the least.

When Fern Hill published the details over at Dammit . . . → Read More: Ford Puppet Shows His Contempt For Constituents . . . → Read More: Ford Puppet Shows His Contempt For Constituents

RedBedHead: KPMG – Helping Tax Dodgers & Corporate Fraudsters Everywhere

The Ford Bros Circus of Stupid decided that the best way to figure out which services we ought to toss on the bonfire was to hire auditing firm KPMG. Well, that’s not quite true. Doug Ford has said that they want to “outsource (privatize) everything t… . . . → Read More: RedBedHead: KPMG – Helping Tax Dodgers & Corporate Fraudsters Everywhere

RedBedHead: Mayor Ford Says: Come To City Hall Thursday, July 28, 9:30AM

Well, well, well, normally an invite from Rob Ford would end up in my garbage quicker than a brochure to take out a subscription to the National Post. But sometimes when opportunity knocks, you just have to listen. And this, I think, is one of those mo… . . . → Read More: RedBedHead: Mayor Ford Says: Come To City Hall Thursday, July 28, 9:30AM

Thanks for Nothing: KPMG and the Review that Wasn’t

When asked by Councillor Mary Fragedakis if they had considered  the long-term costs of cutting support to BIAs or the economic benefits of arts funding or social services, KPMG’s answer was a short and not so sweet,no, we weren’t asked to consi… . . . → Read More: Thanks for Nothing: KPMG and the Review that Wasn’t

Carbon49 - a blog on sustainability for Canadian businesses: Smart KPIs for Sustainability

In any corporate sustainability project, whether it is reducing greenhouse gas emissions, paper use, or supply chain waste, choosing the right key performance indicators is a critical ingredient to success. At the conference on Environmental, Social and Governance Issues hosted by the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants, Cathy Cobey from Ernst & Young talked about how to choose smarter KPIs. . . . → Read More: Carbon49 – a blog on sustainability for Canadian businesses: Smart KPIs for Sustainability