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Alex's Blog: The Year Taxes Made a Comeback

A slightly shorter version of this piece written with Jordan Himelfarb appeared here in The Toronto Star.

It’s just possible that 2014 will be seen as the year that taxes made a comeback in Canada.

Not so long ago Stéphane Dion tried to put a green “tax shift” on the table but apparently we weren’t . . . → Read More: Alex’s Blog: The Year Taxes Made a Comeback

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– The New York Times editorial board points out that a higher minimum wage can produce clear economic benefits for businesses as well as for workers: One 2013 study by three economists — Arindrajit Dube, T. William Lester and Michael Reich — compared the experiences of businesses in neighboring . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Paul Krugman highlights why inequality is indeed an issue which demands action – both for its own sake, and for its impact on other goals such as economic sustainability. And Bill Moyers discusses the difference between a government responsive to its people and one completely controlled by elites: . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Leading the evidence

Paul MacLeod’s post-mortem of Nova Scotia’s election campaign is well worth a read. But following up on Kevin Milligan’s astute point, I’ll point out how one of the main factors in the outcome looks to hint at partisan politics taking yet another turn for the worse – even as it signals what activists may need . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Leading the evidence

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Tim Harper writes about Tom Mulcair’s success in building the NDP up as the leading alternative to the Cons for Canadian voters: Two-thirds of his questions since becoming leader have dealt with the economy as he attempts to build the case that his party can be trusted, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Alice offers her own take on Ian Capstick’s leadership musings by questioning why a current candidate would see more prospect of influencing the race by dropping out now rather than staying in the field: * It is worthwhile being able to win the second choice support of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: On selective concerns

The past decade-plus in Canadian politics has seen a non-stop series of changes to tax rates and structures – with a particular focus on handing yet more money to those who already have the most. And I’ll challenge readers to find a single commentator suggesting that we hold off on the next proposed giveaway because . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On selective concerns

Accidental Deliberations: Room for progressivity

Yes, I know some commentators are treating the latest from Kevin Milligan et al. as somehow proving a point that raising high-income tax levels won’t accomplish anything. But I’d think one has to strain rather hard to draw such an interpretation from a column that includes the following: What might an increase in taxes for . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Room for progressivity

Accidental Deliberations: On optimal choices

It’s a plus that we’re seeing some discussion in Canada as to the optimal income tax rate to maximize revenue. But Paul Krugman goes a step further in pointing out why that revenue-maximizing rate (however calculated) is the optimal rate period: In the first part of the paper, (Peter Diamond and Emmanuel Saenz) analyze the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On optimal choices

Accidental Deliberations: Credit where due

I suspect there’s still going to be plenty of room for argument as to how much attention we ought to pay to inequality in the development of economic policy. But let’s give Kevin Milligan and other UBC economists full credit for their observations when… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Credit where due