Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Miles Corak reviews Branko Milanovic’s new book on the complicated relationship between globalization and income inequality. Dougald Lamont examines the current state of inequality in Canada. And Matthew Yglesias takes a look at research showing that inequality and social friction can be traced back centuries based on the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Don Pittis examines the Cons’ record on jobs and the economy, and reaches the inevitable conclusion that free trade bluster and corporate giveaways have done nothing to help Canadians – which makes it no wonder the Cons are hiding the terms of the deals they sign. And John ...

Accidental Deliberations: On practical changes

One of the main attacks on the NDP’s election platform has been the question of what support there is for the constitutional change required to abolish the Senate. But it’s worth distinguishing between the relatively limited constitutional role actually mandated for the Senate which requires following the constitutional amendment formula, and other past practices and ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jim Stanford, Iglika Ivanova and David MacDonald each highlight how there’s far more to be concerned about in Canada’s economy beyond the GDP dip alone. Both Thomas Walkom and the Star’s editorial board write that it’s clear the Cons have nothing to offer when it comes to trying ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Lee-Anne Goodman reports on studies from both the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PDF) and the Broadbent Institute (PDF) showing that enlarged tax-free savings accounts stand to blow a massive hole in the federal budget while exacerbating inequality. And PressProgress documents and refutes the pitiful response from the right. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Paul Verhaege discusses how unchecked capitalism is changing our personality traits for the worse: There are certain ideal characteristics needed to make a career today. The first is articulateness, the aim being to win over as many people as possible. Contact can be superficial, but since this ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Bill Moyers interviews Richard Wolff about inequality – featuring Wolff’s observation that anybody trying to justify inequality as an inevitable byproduct of unregulated markets manages only to make those markets indefensible: Bill Moyers: When you say that there’s no economic argument that people should be kept at the– ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Robert Reich (via GlenInCA) points out the connection between a strong middle class and curbs on corporate excesses – with may go a long way toward explaining why the business lobby is working so hard to eliminate the concept of a secure livelihood for most workers: Last week’s ...

Politics and its Discontents: For What It’s Worth

There’s something happening here What it is ain’t exactly clear There’s a man with a gun over there Telling me I got to beware Paranoia strikes deep Into your life it will creep It starts when you’re always afraid You step out of line, the man come and take you away For What It’s Worth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Paul Krugman writes about the right-wing belief that “freedom’s just another word for not enough to eat”: (Y)ou might think that ensuring adequate nutrition for children, which is a large part of what SNAP does, actually makes it less, not more likely that those children will be poor ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Bill Curry reports on what looks like a thoroughly warped view of the role of the Minister of Justice and Parliament in assessing the constitutionality of legislation (h/t to bigcitylib): Ottawa is crafting legislation that risks running afoul of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms without informing Parliament, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jim Coyle wonders whether or democracy is in decline, and cites as evidence the utter disconnect between the primary functions of elected representatives and the way politics are covered in the media: (R)eal influence and authority has left the precincts — drifting inexorably over recent decades into ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Kady points out that despite the Cons’ best efforts to stonewall, the Robocon investigation in Guelph looks to have locked in on the source of their fraudulent robocalls. And while it’s indeed somewhat concerning that Elections Canada hasn’t reached anywhere near the same depth of investigation when it ...

Accidental Deliberations: On open channels

Fern Hill is frustrated at how political reporters have tried to make a non-story out of the #denounceharper hashtag which trended globally yesterday as Twitter users took the opportunity to discuss what Canadians actually want for Canada Day. And I can certainly understand the concern at normally well-connected reporters choosing to dismiss widespread public activism, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Our budget, our voice

Aaron and Kady are both chronicling the omnibus budget bill votes as they happen. But lest there be any doubt, there are still plenty of ways to speak out even while the House of Commons is voting – and indeed, now is a great time to highlight the Cons’ cultish devotion to protecting every comma ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – I’ll very much hope Chantal Hebert is wrong in her conclusion that Canadians are getting ever more doubtful as to whether change is possible through the ballot box. But one can’t much argue with her take on why that perception might be developing: In the national capital, ...

CuriosityCat: Robocon: Lest we forget – The Elections Canada CEO report to Parliament

KadyO’Malley did the country a service by refusing to be sidetracked by Harper’sscheduling of the interim reportto the House by ChiefElectoral Officer Marc Mayrand for the same day as thebudget. It turns out that there were lots of journalists inattendance – so it is clear that at least some

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your afternoon reading. – Linda McQuaig writes that Robocon is placing Canada at the forefront of dubious electoral results in the developed world. Which of course means it’s time to evaluate the Cons’ fraud merely as a matter of political damage control, rather than focusing on who’s responsible for what abuses of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – David Climenhaga marvels at the fact that the Fraser Institute manages to claim charitable status while serving as an entirely political organization: The Fraser Institute is serious all right, although its research is not serious in the normal sense of transparency and lack of bias, no matter what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kady points out that the Cons are back to their old tricks in trying to push as much committee work as possible behind closed doors. – Susan Delacourt theorizes that the Cons are likely to use anger rather than fear as their basis for imposing cuts. I ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Jim Stanford highlights a trend of employers forcing work stoppages in order to force massive concessions out of their employees – and notes that the Harper Cons seem to be entirely in favour of that kind of economic disruption as long as it’s workers who stand to lose ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Kady highlights the Cons’ combination of complete incompetence in rejecting positive amendments to their dumb-on-crime bill, and dishonesty in pretending not to introduce exactly the same changes later. And if the Cons were the least bit concerned with *good* government rather than all-controlling government, there would indeed ...

Accidental Deliberations: On logical choices

One might read Kady’s report on the Cons’ efforts to move all committee business in camera – making many of the key actions of our elected representatives completely inaccessible to the public – and ask whether it wouldn’t be easier to simply duct-tape the mouths of all MPs other than those approved to speak by ...

If the shoe fits. Andrew Coyne back at National Post.

When I read a tweet from @AZerbisias just now with this bit of journalistic news, I thought ahah, Coyne didn’t go to a progressive news outlet – that proves he’s a Conservative hack. Then I was reminded of other few journos whom I have respect – Kady O’Malley for one – who sing Coyne’s praises as ...

Accidental Deliberations: On priorities

In the absence of any evidence that the NDP’s new caucus will be anything but a strong opposition to the Harper Cons, Kady goes hunting for a story based on the fact that an NDP anti-floor-crossing bill – having been introduced for the sixth time – is finding its way into the order of precedence ...