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Montreal Simon: Why the Cons Won’t Be Charged For Their Terrorist Attack Ad

If you've seen this latest Con attack ad aimed at Justin Trudeau, you know how monstrous it is.How it starts with the sinister ISIS anthem, and crudely and cruelly exploits the faces of men about to be savagely killed. You know why it's been called a snuff film.And why Stephen Harper should be charged under the provisions of his own ghastly Bill C-51, for spreading terrorist propaganda.But sadly it seems Harper and his ghastly gang will NOT be charged.For at least one very good reason.Read more »

Pushed to the Left and Loving It: Excuse Me Mr. Mulcair, But What in the Hell are Middle Class Values?

I grew up in a family of the working poor, spending a good portion of my childhood in public housing.

My dad did his best to provide for his seven children, but money was tight, and we lived from payday to payday.

He supplemented his income by doing a bit of gardening for a couple of wealthy clients.  We never owned a car, so he would carry his little push mower on the bus.

One summer he decided to try something different. He made arrangements with a man who owned a bit of property close by, to lease a plot (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: Stephen Harper, the Merchant of Fear, and the Con’s Ghastly New Attack Ad

He's tried everything but nothing is working. And the situation couldn't be more desperate.So Stephen Harper is going back to the basics. Back to what he does best.Trying to scare Canadians into voting for him. And attacking Justin Trudeau.Or as he does in the latest, and most grotesque Con attack ad ever, trying to do both at the same time.Read more »

Accidental Deliberations: The abyss calling the kettle black

I’ve previously written that the Libs tend to be entirely incoherent when they can’t make any claim to votes by default – and that the lead in the polls earned by Tom Mulcair and the NDP raised a real possibility that would happen again.

But I’ll readily acknowledge that this goes far beyond my expectations.

Yes, for those scoring along at home: the federal leader of the Liberal Party is trying to score political points by noting another federal leader’s past association with a Liberal Party.

I suppose that’s one way to take “they’re all the same” messaging to a (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On failures of strategy, calculation, politics, principle and general humanity

Shorter Justin Trudeau: Nobody could have foreseen that Canadian voters would judge me based on my actions rather than my self-proclaimed brand.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Daniel Tencer discusses the latest evidence that trickle-down economics are a fraud, while David Roberts and Javier Zarracina write about how the elite seems to get its own way even when the results are worse for everybody. And Heather Stewart reports on the IMF’s findings as to the connection between financialization, inequality and stagnation as the extraction of wealth comes to be valued more than the production of anything useful.

- Meanwhile, Simon Enoch and Cheryl Stadnichuk observe that Saskatchewan is headed down a well-worn path to ruin based on the Wall (Read more…)

Scott's DiaTribes: Real Change – democratic reform package released by Liberals gets attention.

Yesterday in Ottawa, Pierre Trudeau and over 160 candidates (inc. my friend Danielle Takacs) released a set of 32 democratic reform proposals called “Real Change”, which would significantly overhaul how democratic institutions and process work in the country. Everyone knows I’m a Liberal supporter, so hearing I’m excited about these would not be surprising to anyone (particularly the part that says our current electoral model of First Past The Post will be our last in 2015). So let’s look at the reaction of some more non-partisan, even cynical folks out there.

-Paul Wells on Twitter and a more fleshed out (Read more…)

CuriosityCat: Justin Trudeau’s legacy will equal that of his father

Just when Tom Mulcair was starting to measure the curtains in Harper’s home so that he could replace them when he became Prime Minister; when the polls showed a surge of votes for the NDP after the dramatic events in the recent Alberta election; and when pundits have started writing about Justin Trudeau being a washed up politician, Trudeau has taken to the airwaves to unveil a set of promises that will radically change the way that Canadians vote for and interact with their federal government.

The scope of the changes included in the plans to restore democracy in Canada (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Flailbait

Susan Delacourt’s point that Canadian politics have seen a shift toward a permanent campaign is generally well taken. But it’s worth keeping in mind what it means when parties have the opportunity to plan for years in advance of a fixed election date: Political advertising, once only a feature of the official campaigns, now runs in between elections so that parties don’t have to waste precious time “introducing” their leader, including character and values, to the voting public. The between-election ads also give parties a chance to build a storyline around rivals, which will only be hinted at during the (Read more…)

OpenMedia.ca: Liberal candidate David MacLeod resigns after Trudeau’s support for Bill C-51

Looks like Bill C-51 was a major factor in some Liberal candidates quiting. Speak out now to put a stop to this reckless, dangerous and ineffective legislation at KillC51.ca

Article by Jane Taber for The Globe and Mail

The Canadian Forces veteran who was poised to run for the federal Liberals in the northern Nova Scotia riding of Central Nova has resigned as the candidate over his opposition to Justin Trudeau’s support for Bill C-51.

read more

Accidental Deliberations: On damaging positions

I haven’t commented yet on the latest wave of federal polls primarily because I don’t see them radically changing my existing take on Canada’s impending election. But I’ll briefly address what looks like an overreaction to the latest numbers by Michael Harris.

By way of context, here’s my previous analysis as to how the Cons have done in attacking Trudeau: Justin Trudeau’s honeymoon as Liberal leader has come to an end, due to both the usual Conservative barrage of attack ads and his own missteps (most notably his ill-advised support for the Conservatives’ draconian terror bill).

But unlike his predecessors, (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: The New Con Attack Ad and the Disgustingness of Stephen Harper

As we all know Stephen Harper was the man, or the monster, who introduced the most disgusting attack ads this country had ever seen.Extracting them from the bowels of Republican America, with his teeth or his tongue. And using them to destroy his political opponentsWe also know how well they worked for him, until his ads aimed at Justin Trudeau backfired, and started making Harper look like a grubby pervert…

So now as I'm sure you also know, the Cons are filling the airwaves with a new ad aimed at Trudeau, and trying to portray it as a kinder, gentler (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On cooperative priorities

As part of their new “Hope and Wild Flailing” campaign theme, plenty of Libs are looking for any pretext – however lacking in reality – to attack Tom Mulcair. And Mulcair’s latest comments on a coalition offer the latest flimsy excuse. So let’s look at how there’s still a huge difference between the NDP and the Libs when it comes to a willingness to talk about coalitions – but how Mulcair could do far better by working with the NDP’s longstanding willingness to cooperate.

To start with, let’s look at the obvious distinction between the parties’ respective stances.

Trudeau’s position (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s new anti-Trudeau ad is hilarious and mediocre

The Harper Conservatives’ latest 2015 federal election attack ad targeting Liberal leader Justin Trudeau ignores Canadians’ appetite for regime change.

The post Harper’s new anti-Trudeau ad is hilarious and mediocre appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Alberta Politics: Does advertising plagiarism suggest Harper Government’s running on intellectual fumes?

PHOTOS: A screen shot from the new Harper Government anti-Tom-Mulcair advertisement. Actual Harper government plagiarism may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Scenes from the nearly identical 2011 Manitoba NDP 30-second spot and 2015 Harper Con spot. If political ads were popular songs, the Manitoba NDP would probably be getting ready to sue the Harper […]

The post Does advertising plagiarism suggest Harper Government’s running on intellectual fumes? appeared first on Alberta Politics.

Accidental Deliberations: Staying the flawed course

John Ivison is right to note that the Cons’ latest ad reflects the Harper braintrust sticking to what seems to have been a long-established plan. But it’s worth highlighting how that plan has been overtaken by events – and how even the Libs may be able to use the message to their advantage if they’re smart in the approach to this fall’s federal election.

In principle, a “just not ready” message is tailor-made for a two-party race where a party’s ability to attach a single personality flaw to the opposing leader can make all the difference between victory and defeat.

(Read more…)

Susan on the Soapbox: An Open Letter to Stephen Harper about the Debates

Dear Mr Harper: I understand that you’ve decided not to participate in the traditional election debates hosted by the three major TV networks, Global, CTV and CBC. Incidentally, isn’t it convenient they’re known as The Consortium? Conjures up all sorts of sinister images of The Firm and The Company and lends a smattering of credence to your objection.

You’ve rejected The Consortium because you want “more opportunities for freewheeling interaction” and greater “diversity and innovation”. Apparently you expect to get these opportunities with other media organizations like Macleans.

Have you lost your mind?

May I remind you that the last (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On complexities

Bruce Anderson writes that as some of us have long suspected, a true three-party federal race is developing which will create some new complications for the Cons and Libs alike. But it’s worth pointing out one area where the Cons are in much worse shape than they’ve ever been.

Before the 2008 and 2011 elections, the Cons managed to render Stephane Dion and Michael Ignatieff radioactive with voters – with those leaders’ approval ratings running far below the Libs’ party polling results. And over the course of the campaign, an expected convergence between those numbers led to a natural (Read more…)

OpenMedia.ca: iPolitics: Will Liberal Senators vote against Bill C-51 despite Trudeau’s stand?

According to iPolitics, Senate opposition leader James Cowan said he’ll break with the policy of his Liberal party and vote against the Harper government’s controversial anti-terrorism legislation, Bill C-51.

“My sense would be that most Liberal senators will oppose the bill. We’ll propose amendments — not the same amendments they did in the House but similar. For my part, if the amendments aren’t carried, and I don’t expect they will be, then I’ll vote against the bill,” Senator Cowan told iPolitics.ca’s Janice Dickson.

Bill C-51 passed in the House of Commons last week thanks to the support of (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Will McMartin highlights the fact that constant corporate tax slashing has done nothing other than hand ever-larger piles of money to businesses who have no idea what to do with it. But Josh Wingrove reports that Justin Trudeau is looking for excuses to keep up the handouts to the corporate sector.

- Joseph Stiglitz offers (PDF) a thorough review of our options in lessening corporate hegemony, while Elizabeth Warren and Rosa Delauro ask why citizens should accept trade agreements being written in secret by and for the corporate sector. And David Dayen (Read more…)

OpenMedia.ca: Liberals are cutting their membership cards after Bill C-51 vote

Did the Liberals really think their voters wouldn’t care about that Bill C-51 vote? Well, they were wrong. 

Article by ThinkPol

Social media is abuzz with images of Liberal supporters symbolically cutting up their party membership cards after their leader Justin Trudeau voted in favour of Bill C-51 at the anti-terrorism legislation’s third reading in the House of Commons.

Disillusioned supporters also plastered Trudeau’s Facebook page with angry comments about the party’s support for the controversial bill which has been denounced as dangerous and draconian by legal experts, academics, former Prime Ministers, First Nations groups, civil society organizations and (Read more…)

Left Over: The Thought Police: Alive and Well and Ruling in Canada

Ottawa considering hate charges against those who boycott Israel Blaney’s office cites ‘comprehensive’ hate laws for new zero tolerance plans

By Neil Macdonald, CBC News Posted: May 11, 2015 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: May 11, 2015 5:00 AM ET

”ll bet Junior Trudeau is so happy he signed off on C-51…right now, my instinct is to declare that I have in fact been boycotting any Israeli products for years, as have many others. If the Cons want to come after me in any way, shape or form I’m happy to oblige them. I’mm betting that lawyers will be lining up (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Working across the aisle

Among the other lessons learned from Alberta’s recent election, let’s point out one more with implications for the federal scene.

While the main opposition parties recognized that they were too far apart in their general policy orientation to justify a formal coalition, both the NDP and the Wildrose Party were happy to point out some of the areas which were ripe for cooperation as part of their criticism of the governing PCs.

In other words, neither tried to pretend that there was no room to discuss post-election cooperation, nor to claim that some areas of disagreement or personal differences rendered (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- PressProgress weighs in on corporate Canada’s twelve-figure tax avoidance, while noting that the Cons’ decision to slash enforcement against tax cheats (while attacking charities instead) goes a long way toward explaining the amount of money flowing offshore. And Oxfam is working on its own Canadian fair tax campaign.

- Robert Frank highlights the complete disconnect from reality which results in most American millionaires claiming that they’re in the middle class, rather than representing a privileged few. And Stephen Gordon writes that there’s a similar sleight of hand at work in the Libs’ “middle (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Sean McElwee offers a new set of evidence that the right-wing Republicans who run on the economy in fact do it nothing but harm. And David Dayen discusses how Bernie Sanders may be able to push the U.S.’ policy discussion into a far more positive area by forcing both parties to confront the failure of corporatist economics.

- But David MacDonald warns that Justin Trudeau and the Libs are trying to force Canada into a limited choice between tax baubles for the upper class. And Chantal Hebert too sees Trudeau as (Read more…)