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Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Sunday reading.- David Korten writes that despite the trend of the past few decades, there’s nothing inevitable about international agreements inevitably favouring capital over citizens rather than the other way around.-… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Montreal Simon: The Grim Story of Postmedia and the Millionaire’s Club

Oh dear. I can only imagine what the mood at Postmedia headquarters must be like after the latest bit of bad news.With writers like John Ivison and Andrew Coyne fighting over the last place in the lifeboat.Or begging their boss Paul Godfrey to give the… . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: The Grim Story of Postmedia and the Millionaire’s Club

Accidental Deliberations: On consensus-building

John Ivison is a bit melodramatic on behalf of the Cons in assessing the impact of possible electoral reform. But to the extent the Cons actually accept his argument, it might well lead them toward the best possible outcome in the form of a proportiona… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On consensus-building

Accidental Deliberations: On acceptable surprises

When Alice Funke first identified the effect of an extended writ period under the Cons’ well-hidden revisions to the Canada Elections Act, I mused the effect was less problematic than it appeared at first glance. But now that the possibility of an extra-long campaign looks fairly real and the issue is drawing more discussion, let’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On acceptable surprises

Accidental Deliberations: Staying the flawed course

John Ivison is right to note that the Cons’ latest ad reflects the Harper braintrust sticking to what seems to have been a long-established plan. But it’s worth highlighting how that plan has been overtaken by events – and how even the Libs may be able to use the message to their advantage if they’re . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Staying the flawed course

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Louis-Philippe Rochon reviews the Cons’ track record as irresponsible economic and financial managers. Statistics Canada looks at the debt picture facing Canadians and finds young workers and families in particular fighting against increasing debt loads. And Forum finds that no matter how many hangers-on trumpet the theme of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Arthur Neslen reports on the Health and Environmental Alliance’s study of greenhouse gas emission reductions showing that we’d enjoy both improved health and economic benefits by pursuing ambitious targets to fight climate change. And David Roberts examines the massive cost and minimal benefit of carbon capture and storage . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On exclusivity

Shorter Harper Cons: We’ll consider allowing democratic oversight of CSIS just as soon as that know-nothing public stops electing MPs who aren’t us.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Cons’ attempt to spin an election narrative out of a fictional bogeyman rather than protecting or helping Canadians.

For further reading…– The National Academy of Sciences offers a comparison of death rates from multiple causes in Canada and elsewhere, while Statistics Canada has more detailed data. And it’s also worth a reminder . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how leaders who stand up to hysterical calls to abandon peace and human rights in the name of fleeting threats tend to be vindicated by history – and how Thomas Mulcair is carrying on the NDP’s legacy on that front even in the face of criticism from Very Serious People.

For further . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Politics and its Discontents: A Bit Of Anti-Union Hysteria From John Ivison

It’s funny, isn’t it, that the Harper regime can use our tax dollars to monitor us, manipulate us, and promulgate all kinds of propaganda, but somehow it’s not right, indeed downright unholy, according to the National Post’s John Ivison, when unions fight back.

Said journalist suggests Mr. Harper should consider calling an early election, . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: A Bit Of Anti-Union Hysteria From John Ivison

Alberta Diary: Waitin’ for the end of the world … Hear, O Ontario! Mr. Manning will be with you momentarily

Preston Manning readies himself before the mirror of his Seventh Floor office at the Prophetic Market Institute in Calgary, the Calgary skyline in the background obscured by a June rainstorm, one of those June rainstorms, as he ponders the frightening meaning of last Thursday’s Ontario election. Actual Alberta market fundamentalists and the names . . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Waitin’ for the end of the world … Hear, O Ontario! Mr. Manning will be with you momentarily

Accidental Deliberations: Also, James Moore is firmly devoted to swatting flies which threaten the very fabric of space-time

No, the Cons still can’t be bothered to try to actually identify mythical “trade barriers” as they push to give the corporate powers that be a practical veto over provincial governments. But they’re certainly trying to make the myth sound more terrifying – and they won’t meet anything more than mindless repetition from John Ivison.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Also, James Moore is firmly devoted to swatting flies which threaten the very fabric of space-time

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Michael Katz looks back at how the U.S. abandoned its poor – and how that choice continues to affect people across the income spectrum today. And Michael Valpy discusses how Canada can and should avoid travelling any further down the same path – with his “Big Four” ideas . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how this week’s federal by-elections seem to confirm that another minority Parliament is a real possibility in 2015 – even as the main parties all rule out any discussion of what would happen under that scenario.

For further reading…– I make reference in the column to John Ivison’s rough calculations as to how . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– John Ivison makes the case for more discussion of government spending rather than corruption and scandal. But it’s PressProgress leading the way in actually reporting on that front – featuring revelations that multiple resource-related ministers’ office have received massive spending boosts, while program spending for First Nations, the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Tim Harper discusses Stephen Harper’s current list of distractions – with Rob Ford and his Senate appointees naturally topping the list. But sadly, while John Ivison may be right in noting that actual citizens are having trouble getting the Cons to bother administering federal programs, the combination of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Thomas Walkom writes that the Harper Cons’ much-hyped economic record in fact offers ample reason to demand a change in government: The Conservatives insist that the economy is their strong suit. And for a while it was. In 2011, voters bought Harper’s pitch.

But voter patience can last . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

CuriosityCat: 2015: The ballot question in Canada’s next election?

Methinks John Ivison has hit the nail right on its head with this:

If the Auditor-General’s report does suggest a systemic problem of corruption and abuse, who would bet against the Conservatives using the Senate as a classic wedge issue, pointing out that the Liberals are in favour of preserving the country’s most expensive . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: 2015: The ballot question in Canada’s next election?

Alberta Diary: Got trouble with ‘overbearing urban planners’? The Manning Centre wants to help!

A civic election all-candidates’ meeting in Calgary. “Why don’t we pass the time with a game of solitaire?” Actual Manning Centre supported candidates may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Manning Centre namesake Preston Manning; Calgary Mayor Naheed Nenshi; Calgary developer Cal Wenzel (CTV photo).

If on Oct. 21 the market-fundamentalist slate trained . . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Got trouble with ‘overbearing urban planners’? The Manning Centre wants to help!

daveberta.ca - Alberta politics: Breaking: Premiers declare victory after national meeting

Tweet“Over the past few days at the annual Council of the Federation meeting, we made a great deal of progress on a number of critically important issues to Albertans,” said Premier Alison Redford in a July 26, 2013 media release. It would be surprising if Canada’s premiers did not claim victory after gathering in cozy . . . → Read More: daveberta.ca – Alberta politics: Breaking: Premiers declare victory after national meeting

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– George Monbiot proposes a basic income as one of the great ideas needed to challenge corporatist orthodoxy: A basic income (also known as a citizen’s income) gives everyone, rich and poor, without means-testing or conditions, a guaranteed sum every week. It replaces some but not all benefits . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: It takes a Village

Shorter John Ivison:

I consider it a sign of profound unseriousness that Romeo Saganash and the NDP want to give effect to an international treaty which might result in indigenous people having some influence over policy. Veto power for multinational corporate conglomerates, that’s fine. But *people*? Outrageous, says I.

BigCityLib Strikes Back: On Simplistic Arguments

From John Ivison’s column today:

Another area where the government is attempting to make structural changes that could end the cycle of poverty and despair is by creating a First Nations Education Act, aimed at dragging native education into the 21st century. Currently, reserve schools have no regular reporting system, there is no dispensation for . . . → Read More: BigCityLib Strikes Back: On Simplistic Arguments

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Frances Russell discusses how the Cons have corporatized Canadian politics: In fact, elevating corporate rights over the rights of citizens and their democractic institutions seems to be the Harper government’s core agenda. Its aggressive “free trade” stance has led to agreements with Panama, Jordan, Columbia, Iceland, Liechtenstein, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links