Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Danyaal Raza discusses how climate change is manifesting itself in immediate health problems. And John Vidal highlights the latest research on the rapid melting of Arctic ice – making it particularly appalling that Canada has abandoned its main Arctic port to rot. – Elizabeth McSheffrey notes that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Glen Pearson makes the case for transcending cynicism in our politics, including the choice to stay involved once an election is done. And Ian Welsh reminds us that our definition of property is socially established – meaning that many of the assumptions as to what we can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – PressProgress highlights the disturbingly large number of Canadians spending more than half their income on a restrictively-defined set of basic necessities. And Elaine Power points out what a basic income could do to end food insecurity and improve public health: We know from the social determinants of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – David Ball talks to Joseph Stiglitz about inequality and its causes – including the spread of corporate control through trade agreements: What would you say is the dominant cause [of growing inequality]? The weak economy, partly associated with austerity, has led to a weak labour market. The official ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Julie Delahanty discusses the need for Canada’s federal government to rein in rising inequality. And Tim Stacey duly challenges the excuse that today’s poor people just aren’t poor enough to deserve any consideration. – Amy Goodman interviews Joseph Stiglitz about the serious problems with the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Andrea ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Roderick Benns interviews Michael Clague about his work on a basic income dating back nearly fifty years. And Glen Pearson’s series of posts about a basic income is well worth a read. – Meanwhile, Julia Belluz interviews Sir Michael Marmot about the connection between inequality and poor social ...

OpenMedia.ca: National Post: How one guy tried to copyright a chicken sandwich. (With tomato, lettuce, garlic, and mayo)

On copyright crazy… Article by Roberto Fedrman, Washington Post In 1987, Norberto Colón Lorenzana had what we can all agree is a pretty unremarkable idea. Colón, who had just started working at a fast food joint called Church’s Chicken in Puerto Rico, suggested to his employer that they try adding a basic fried chicken sandwich ...

centre of the universe: Money for Nothing

Copyright is, at its simplest form, the method by which creators are paid for their work. It is a registration of an intellectual property (IP). It says “the creator has the right to charge, or not to charge, money for you to use this”. It’s not a form of censorship (and no court would rightfully ...

OpenMedia.ca: CBC: ‘Shrewd’ Canada playing long game as TPP trade talks begin in Maui

Aloha! Welcome to the weekend, where things get real for TPP negotiations in Hawaii. Speak out now at StoptheSecrecy.net Article by Janyce McGregor for CBC News As Canada’s lead negotiator Kirsten Hillman and the rest of her Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiating team sit down with their counterparts in Maui, Hawaii this weekend, they may sense pounding from more than ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week. – Murray Dobbin writes about the damage caused after decades of allowing the corporate elite to dictate economic policy – and notes that the Cons are determined to make matters all the worse: However you see it — as separate from society or integral to it — Canada’s “economy” is ...

The Canadian Progressive: Secret TPP talks in Ottawa: Harper has “something to hide”

“Most Canadians would be surprised to learn that Canada is hosting the latest round of TPP negotiations this week in Ottawa,” says University of Ottawa Prof Michael Geist The post Secret TPP talks in Ottawa: Harper has “something to hide” appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Art Threat: Michelangelo’s David takes up arms in American gun ad

An American weapons manufacturer is the subject of outrage in Italy — but this international offensive lies strictly within the cultural realm. ArmaLite, an Illinois-based small arms engineering firm, has bestowed indignity upon Michelangelo’s David by using the classical sculpture as a prop in a rifle advertisement. The tacky advert has incensed Italian culture minister ...

The Disaffected Lib: Krugman Gives TPP a Thumbs Down.

New York Times economist and Nobel laureate economist, Paul Krugman, tends to support free trade but even he wants the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact, or TPP, dead and buried. Krugman’s big objection is that the deal allows corporations to monopolize intellectual property and will result in monopolized trade, not free trade. Is this a good ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Murray Dobbin writes about the crisis of extreme capitalism: (T)he “free economy” romanticized by Friedman and his ilk is anything but. Completely dominated by giant corporations whose wealth outstrips all but the richest nations, economic freedom does not exist for anyone else, including the vast majority of businesses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading… – Joseph Stiglitz discusses the abuse of intellectual property law to turn publicly-funded research into privately-held profit centres (no matter how many people die as a result): (A) Utah-based company, Myriad Genetics, claims more than that. It claims to own the rights to any test for the presence ...

Accidental Deliberations: #mtlqc13 Priority Resolution – Human Rights

The final panel on policy resolutions at the NDP’s Montreal convention will deal with human rights issues. And the Young New Democrats of Quebec have proposed a resolution which covers a number of issues worth including in that discussion: 6-26-13Resolution on Rights in the Digital AgeSubmitted by the Young New Democrats of QuebecWHEREAS protecting digital ...

The Canadian Progressive: Jeremy Hammond: Aaron Swartz & the Criminalization of Digital Dissent

 It is not the “crimes” Aaron (Swartz) may have committed that made him a target of federal prosecution, but his ideas – elaborated in his “Guerrilla Open Access Manifesto” – that the government has found so dangerous. By Jeremy Hammond – #18729-424 | Metropolitan Correctional Center, Feb. 20, 2013: The tragic death of internet freedom fighter ...

Canadian Progressive: What’s Wrong With TPP?: Prominent Academics Respond

Prominent Academics Respond to the TPP (via EFF)   We asked several academics to let us know their thoughts about the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP). The TPP is a secretive, multi-national trade agreement that threatens to extend restrictive intellectual property (IP) laws across the globe and rewrite international rules on its enforcement… RELATED: The Canadian Progressive ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Carol Goar comments on the CEP/CAW plan to merge and work toward a far more active type of unionism: Both the CAW and the CEP — of which I am a member — gobbled up smaller unions to reach their current size. But neither achieved the critical ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Since the Cons don’t seem to have much else in their quiver at the moment, I’m sure they’ll keep trying to pretend that it’s monstrous of Thomas Mulcair to suggest that all industries (including those in Alberta) pay the cost of their real environmental impact. But the sales ...

On controlling the internet.

On intellectual property rights.

On the ethics of piracy.

Law is Cool: What, What, In the Butt?

Yes, this video is actually being litigated on copyright infringement grounds. Summary from Electronic Frontier Foundation, South Park aired the “What What” parody in a 2008 episode critiquing the popularity of absurd online videos. Two years later, copyright owner Brownmark Films sued Viacom and Comedy Central, accusing South Park of infringement. A federal judge dismissed ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Access Copyright

I have an opinion piece out on Access Copyright, English Canada’s longtime copyright middleman. I argue that Access Copyright is a bit like the Blockbuster Video of Canadian university libraries—once indispensable, and now almost obsolete (largely due the Internet). Within a year from now, it’s possible that no Canadian university will still have day-to-day dealings with ...