Accidental Deliberations: On alternative explanations

In 2011, one of the turning points in Canada’s federal election campaign (at least in determining which party would form the Official Opposition) came when voters learned about Michael Ignatieff’s refusal to show up for work in the House of Commons. One might have expected the Libs’ next leader to avoid leaving himself open to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Compare and contrast

One party’s response to a limited amount of Parliamentary resources: “New Democrat MPs were responsible for 56 per cent of all private members’ motions, and 59 per cent of all private members’ bills. Compared to other parties, that’s four times as many motions and five times as many bills per MP. We work hard in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Kept on track

Impolitical rightly points out that the Harper Cons are well on their way to implementing every single odious policy that was rightly labeled as unacceptable overreach when included in Deficit Jim Flaherty’s 2008 fiscal update. Now if only somebody hadn’t proudly missed the opportunity to stop Harper in his tracks…

Accidental Deliberations: Stonewalled

Not that it should come as much surprise that the release of the first report (PDF) from the Afghan detainee document panel fits the pattern of delay and distraction from the Cons. But this declaration (italics added) looks to take the stonewalling to a new low: Status of the Panel’s Review of Cabinet Confidentiality Claims ...

Accidental Deliberations: On destructive suggestions

Lest there be any doubt, one of the most important ways an opposition party can have influence in a majority Parliament is by choosing issues to highlight, thereby creating a perceived safe space for the governing party to act if it so chooses. Which is to say that now might be a great time for ...

Accidental Deliberations: On losing strategies

Sure, Greg is right to criticize the Libs for being willing to provoke a national unity crisis for political gain. But I’m not sure when that became reason for surprise: have we already forgotten that the party’s main Quebec strategy during its stay in government from 1993 to 2006 involved picking fights with the Bloc ...