Categories

A sample text widget

Etiam pulvinar consectetur dolor sed malesuada. Ut convallis euismod dolor nec pretium. Nunc ut tristique massa.

Nam sodales mi vitae dolor ullamcorper et vulputate enim accumsan. Morbi orci magna, tincidunt vitae molestie nec, molestie at mi. Nulla nulla lorem, suscipit in posuere in, interdum non magna.

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). And over at the Behind the Numbers web site, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Ten things to know about the CPP debate.” The blog post’s other co-authors are Allan Moscovitch and Richard Lochead.

Points raised in the blog . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

The Progressive Economics Forum: Guaranteed Annual Income

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Ten things to know about Canada’s guaranteed annual income debate.”

Points raised in the blog post include the following:

-There are people and groups on both the left and right of the political spectrum who favour a Guaranteed Annual . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Guaranteed Annual Income

Things Are Good: Men Shouldn’t Worry About Being Breadwinners

Gender stereotypes and expectations aren’t good for anybody, and there’s more and more evidence that men who worry about having to be the primary income earners hurts their health. The old way of thinking that a man had to earn more than his partner in a heterosexual relationship no longer makes sense. Thanks to the […]

The post Men Shouldn’t Worry About Being Breadwinners appeared first on Things Are Good.

. . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Men Shouldn’t Worry About Being Breadwinners

Things Are Good: Ontario to Test Basic Income

Basic income is the idea that people will have enough money to live (food and shelter) regardless of their employment status. Manitoba tried this decades ago and it worked, but was cancelled for political reasons. A basic income is needed now more than ever since robots are going to take all the jobs. Plus, inequality […]

The post Ontario to Test Basic Income appeared first on Things Are Good.

. . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Ontario to Test Basic Income

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada

This afternoon I gave a presentation at Raising the Roof’s Child & Family Homelessness Stakeholder Summit in Toronto. My slide deck can be downloaded here. To accompany the presentation, I’ve prepared the following list of “Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada.”

1.Efforts to enumerate persons experiencing homeless have generally been spotty, but it . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada

The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix Choses à Savoir sur l’Itinérance au Canada

Cet après-midi, j’ai fait une présentation au Child & Family Homelessness Stakeholder Summit, organisé par Chez Toit, à Toronto. Ma presentation, illustrée de diapositives, peut être téléchargée ici. Pour accompagner la présentation, je vous ai préparé la liste suivante des « Dix choses à savoir sur l’itinérance au Canada. »

1. Les tentatives de dénombrer . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix Choses à Savoir sur l’Itinérance au Canada

The Progressive Economics Forum: Wages: Up, Down, or Sideways?

We’re coming up to a Federal Election, and one where “The Economy” will likely be a central battlefield. As such, we’re going to hear many claims and counter-claims that support the view that Stephen Harper is either the Greatest or Worst Prime Minister ever.

One point of contention is wages. Part of the problem are . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Wages: Up, Down, or Sideways?

The Progressive Economics Forum: Climate Justice and the Good Life, for Everyone

In our Climate Justice Project, our research has stressed structural changes and collective action to lower carbon footprints rather than individual behavioural change. The ability of many actors to respond to incentives like a carbon tax is constrained by their circumstances. Suburban households often have no realistic option but to keep driving. Renters have little . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Climate Justice and the Good Life, for Everyone

The Progressive Economics Forum: 3 worrisome facts about BC’s job market on the eve of Budget 2015

2015 marks the sixth year of BC’s recovery from the recession. But it’s been a slow and largely jobless recovery in BC.

1. BC needs 93,000 more jobs to return to our pre-recession employment rate (the proportion of working age British Columbians who have jobs).

Only 71.2% of working age British Columbians have jobs . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: 3 worrisome facts about BC’s job market on the eve of Budget 2015

The Progressive Economics Forum: ‘Tis the Season to Rethink Our Charitable Giving

This op-ed by yours truly was published in The Province. The examples are BC-specific, but the message is much broader: donating to charity is not enough, we also have to change the status quo that forces so many people to turn to charity in a rich country like Canada.

It’s December, the season for . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: ‘Tis the Season to Rethink Our Charitable Giving

The Progressive Economics Forum: Should Welfare Recipients Try Harder to Find Work?

This morning the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation released a new report about “motivational interviewing” for welfare recipients. The link to the full report is here, and the link to the executive summary is here.

Authored by Reuben Ford, Jenn Dixon, Shek-wai Hui, Isaac Kwakye and Danielle Patry, the study reports on a recent randomized . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Should Welfare Recipients Try Harder to Find Work?

The Progressive Economics Forum: The labour share and income inequality

All the recent talk about the Canada’s shrinking middle class and rising income inequality got me thinking that it might be a good time to take a fresh look at a somewhat neglected economic concept: the labour share of income. The labour share of income hopes to measure the portion of the economic pie going . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: The labour share and income inequality

Wise Law Blog: Intentional Under-Employment – Judges Tell Payors "Get a Real Job!"

When will Ontario’s courts impute income to a parent for the purpose of calculating his or her child support obligations?Section 19(1)(a) of the Child Support Guidelines grants the court the right to impute income to a parent if deemed appropriate to do so under the circumstances.  For example, the court may impute income to a payor . . . → Read More: Wise Law Blog: Intentional Under-Employment – Judges Tell Payors "Get a Real Job!"

The Progressive Economics Forum: When Good Data Goes Bad: The NHS2011

This piece was published today in the Globe and Mail’s Economy Lab.

Two findings stand out in the National Household Survey (NHS) data released Wednesday, both critical in this post-recession era of uncertainty:

1) A quarter of Canadian households spent 30 per cent or more of their pre-tax income on shelter, the official measure . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: When Good Data Goes Bad: The NHS2011

The Progressive Economics Forum: Funding Cuts to Alberta’s PSE Sector: There Are Alternatives

It has recently been reported that the University of Alberta wants to “reopen two-year collective agreements” with faculty and staff “to help the university balance its budget…”

This appears to be in direct response to Alberta’s provincial government announcing in its March budget that there would be a “7% cut to operating grants to universities, . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Funding Cuts to Alberta’s PSE Sector: There Are Alternatives

The Canadian Progressive: Poverty the biggest barrier to good health for Canadians: Report

Poverty is making Canadians sick, according to a new report released Tuesday by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA), “the national voice of Canadian physicians.”

The post Poverty the biggest barrier to good health for Canadians: Report appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Progressive Economics Forum: Who Is Earning Too Much?

 

Last week’s publication of the so-called “sunshine” list of 88,412 Ontario public sector workers earning more than $100,000 per year elicited lots of howls of outrage in terms of on line commentary.

It should not be forgotten that the whole point of the annual list – which dates back to the Harris days – . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Who Is Earning Too Much?

The Progressive Economics Forum: Women On Top, By the Numbers

On the occasion of International Women’s Day, we ask: Are more women making it to the top in Canada? And what does that mean for the 100 per cent? The 2013 edition, by the numbers. (All data are most recently available statistics.)

1 out of 5: 21 per cent of the people in the top . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Women On Top, By the Numbers

The Canadian Progressive: What Paulo Coelho and other global leaders tweeted about at World Economic Forum in Davos

by Obert Madondo | The Canadian Progressive, Jan. 31, 2013: Let’s agree in one point: we can have anything, but we CAN’T have everything #wef — Paulo Coelho (@paulocoelho) January 25, 2013 The tweet by Paulo Coelho, the world-renowned Brazilian author of The Alchemist, was one of the most popular of world leaders’ reflections during . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: What Paulo Coelho and other global leaders tweeted about at World Economic Forum in Davos

The Progressive Economics Forum: Welcome to the Wageless Recovery

The Harper government likes to remind Canadians that we’ve done better than most developed nations in bouncing back from the global economic crisis. But digging into the data shows why many people might be having trouble cheering this news: wages have not kept pace with inflation, and new hires are making 40 per cent less . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Welcome to the Wageless Recovery

Canadian ProgressiveCanadian Progressive: Elizabeth May calls for a “Guaranteed Livable Income” in Canada

by Obert Madondo (@Obiemad) Green Party leader Elizabeth May is calling for a “Guaranteed Livable Income” as a strategy to eradicate poverty in Canada. In a press release commemorating October 17, the United Nations Day for the Eradication of Poverty, the MP for Saanich-Gulf Islands said the Green Party of Canada was the only federal . . . → Read More: Canadian ProgressiveCanadian Progressive: Elizabeth May calls for a “Guaranteed Livable Income” in Canada

Canadian ProgressiveCanadian Progressive: Elizabeth May calls for a “Guaranteed Livable Income” in Canada

Today, October 17, is the United Nations International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. Elizabeth May, the leader of the Green Party of Canada and MP for Saanich-Gulf Islands, is calling for a “Guaranteed Livable Income” in Canada. “The theme of the 2012 observance is ‘Ending the Violence of Extreme Poverty’. It serves as a . . . → Read More: Canadian ProgressiveCanadian Progressive: Elizabeth May calls for a “Guaranteed Livable Income” in Canada

Canadian ProgressiveCanadian Progressive: How the Gov’t Is Saddling Parents with College Loans They Can’t Afford

by Marian Wang | ProPublica More than a decade after Aurora Almendral first set foot on her dream college campus, she and her mother still shoulder the cost of that choice. Almendral had been accepted to New York University in 1998, but even after adding up scholarships, grants, and the max she could take out . . . → Read More: Canadian ProgressiveCanadian Progressive: How the Gov’t Is Saddling Parents with College Loans They Can’t Afford

The Scott Ross: Canada’s Poverty of Poverty Measurement

It isn’t just astounding to the average Canadian that their country doesn’t have an official poverty line, it’s astounding that no one, including the major political parties, is doing anything about it.

Below are excerpts from governments, organizations, and charities that highlight the need for Canada to finally create an official poverty line:

. . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Canada’s Poverty of Poverty Measurement

The Scott Ross: Canada Is Missing The Poverty Line

Canada is holding out its hands asking for change, our country is in poverty and it needs our help.

Where other countries are working to reduce their poverty like responsible world citizens, Canada is doing nothing. And worse yet it can’t even hope to lift itself out of poverty because Canada doesn’t even know what . . . → Read More: The Scott Ross: Canada Is Missing The Poverty Line