Scripturient: Kellie Leitch’s politics of division

They’re not like us. They’re not our religion. They’re not our colour. They don’t speak our language. They don’t dress like us. They don’t eat like us. They don’t drive like us, shop like us, read like us, walk like us. We need to control them. Deport them. Jail them. Make them convert. Make them ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a progressive message of shared wealth creation: A progressive economic agenda must have at its heart an understanding of wealth creation as a collective process. Yes, businesses are wealth creators, but they do not create wealth alone. Workers, public institutions and civil ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michael Harris argues that it’s long past time for the Trudeau Libs to start living up to their oft-repeated promise of real change – rather than merely slapping a friendlier face on the same old regressive Con policies. – Tom Parkin notes that Canada’s working class has been ...

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: In diversity, there is strength

World-renowned Canadian scientist, broadcaster, activist and author David Suzuki explains how life has “fluctuated and flourished because of the resilience conferred by diversity” over millennia. The post David Suzuki: In diversity, there is strength appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: WHAT BREXIT MEANS TO UK CAREGIVERS AND WHY POLICY MATTERS EVERYWHERE

News feeds are awash in stories of the BREXIT referendum debacle in the UK.  Weak and deceitful campaigns on both sides of the argument about whether to leave the European Union or not resulted in a surprise victory by the ‘Leavers’, prompting the Prime Minister to resign.  The nation is wringing its hands, lamenting ‘what ...

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: WHAT BREXIT MEANS TO UK CAREGIVERS AND WHY POLICY MATTERS EVERYWHERE

News feeds are awash in stories of the BREXIT referendum debacle in the UK.  Weak and deceitful campaigns on both sides of the argument about whether to leave the European Union or not resulted in a surprise victory by the ‘Leavers’, prompting the Prime Minister to resign.  The nation is wringing its hands, lamenting ‘what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Andre Picard writes about the devastating effects of widespread social isolation, particularly given its connection to poverty: All told, it is estimated that about six million Canadians live an isolated existence. We have an epidemic of loneliness, and the principal underlying cause is poverty. If you’re poor, you’re ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Brent Patterson points out the continued dangers of extrajudicial challenges to laws under the CETA. And John Jacobs examines (PDF) the likelihood that reduced tariffs under the Trans-Pacific Partnership would mostly push Canada toward further dependence on resource extraction. – Ken Jacobs, Zohar Perla, Ian Perry and Dave ...

Song of the Watermelon: Vancouver Sun Letter

I have a letter on The Vancouver Sun’s website (online only, it would appear) replying to a ridiculous op-ed piece that blames the high cost of housing on “mass immigration.” My response is restrained in both tone and word count, but suffice it to say I disagree with the op-ed writer’s argument. To read my ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Andrea Germanos follows up on the IMF’s realization that handing free money and power to corporations does nothing for the economy as it affects people’s lives. And Susie Cagle examines the role of tech money – like other massive accumulations of wealth – in exacerbating inequalities in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Peter Mazereeuw reports on the growing opposition to the Trans-Pacific Partnership which may result in it never coming into force. And Jerry Dias reminds us why we should be glad if that movement wins out over the corporate forces who assembled it behind closed doors: (T)he far ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Tim Harford discusses John Maynard Keynes’ failed prediction that workers would continue to win increased leisure time over the past few decades: (I)t is worth teasing out the nature and extent of Keynes’s error. He was right to predict that we would be working less. We enter ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – CBC exposes the galling amnesty deal offered by the Canada Revenue Agency to wealthy individuals who evaded paying tax through a sham offshoring scheme. – Caelainn Barr and Shiv Malik examine the generational divide which is seeing the income of young adults wither away across most of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – The Star-Phoenix duly calls out the Wall government’s short-sighted slashing of funding for homeless shelters: Regardless of how the government frames the changes, access to services is being denied to some of the most vulnerable people in the communities of Saskatoon and North Battleford. And the government ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson offers his prescription for Canada’s economy in the face of plunging oil prices and a sinking dollar. And Murray Dobbin argues that the Libs’ handling of trade agreements reflects a fundamental economic choice between a socially-oriented economic outlook which has worked in the past, and a ...

Politics and its Discontents: Let’s Not Feel Smug

After almost 10 years’ dalliance with darkness, Canadians certainly have no reason to feel smug. That we survived with our core values intact, something I was far from certain would be the case should, however, be a source of pride. A story in today’s Star makes the case quite nicely, I think. Contrasting Canada and ...

A. Picazo: #RefugeesWelcome

This op-ed appeared in The Ottawa Citizen on November 27, 2015.  “This is not a federal project, this is not even a government project, it’s a national project for all Canadians,” declared John McCallum, minister of immigration, refugees and citizenship, in announcing the long-awaited details of the Liberal government’s strategy to welcome refugees fleeing the chaos in Syria. It’s an ambitious ...

Dented Blue Mercedes: The Problem is Fundamentalism, Not Islam (or Christianity).

When I started my transition, the first troubles I had were with the tenants in my building, though the conflicts weren’t overt.  Instead, it seemed as though I’d had the plague: neighbours shunned me.  Someone talked loudly in the hall on more than one occasion (probably deliberately) about how they didn’t think I “should be ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Rosemary Barton reports on the Libs’ announcement of increased funding to help developing countries fight climate change – which does represent a noteworthy improvement on the Cons’ comparative stinginess. But as I’ve noted, it doesn’t much help to deal with only one aspect of the issue – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Martin Whittaker reminds us that the American public is eager for a far more fair distribution of income than the one provided for by the U.S.’ current political and economic ground rules. But Christo Aivalis writes that there’s a difference between a preference and a cause – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Mike Barber highlights how Canada’s federal election campaign was dominated by messages pushed from the top down rather than citizens’ concerns. Erna Paris recognizes that we can’t afford to be complacent about the place of outright bigotry in shaping voters’ decisions. And Christopher Flavelle writes that the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Jennifer Wells writes about the drastic difference in pay between CEOs and everybody else. And Henry Farrell interviews Lauren Rivera about the advantage privileged children have in being able to rely on parents’ social networks and funding rather than needing to learn or work for themselves: One ...

A. Picazo: Need To Know: On Syria And The Migrant/Refugee Crisis

This was initially meant to be a lengthy Facebook post for those who look to me for information on complex matters (which I do happily, by request). However, it received such appreciation and requests to make it open to all (which I eventually did) that I thought I’d post it here, too, but with additional links/further info for ...

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s “old stock Canadians” line is downright racist and xenophobic

Did Lynton Crosby, the Australian “master of dog whistle politics”, have anything to do with Stephen Harper’s racist, divisive and xenophobic “old stock Canadians” line? It’s possible. The post Harper’s “old stock Canadians” line is downright racist and xenophobic appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Aylan Kurdi’s drowning death exposes Canada’s inaction on the Syrian refugee crisis

A leading Canadian refugee right group says last week’s tragic drowning death of Aylan Kurdi highlights the human costs of the Harper government’s inaction on the Syria’s growing refugee crisis. The post Aylan Kurdi’s drowning death exposes Canada’s inaction on the Syrian refugee crisis appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.