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Canadian Dimension: An appeal to Green Party of Canada members

Illustration by Carlos Latuff

As Israel’s illegal military occupation approaches a half-century, it’s long past time for concrete international action to pressure its government to reverse course. The Green Party of Canada’s recent vote to support “the use of divestment, boycott and sanctions (BDS) that are targeted at those sectors of Israel’s economy . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: An appeal to Green Party of Canada members

Dented Blue Mercedes: Pitting “identity politics” against class struggle is backwards, and the path to self-defeat

I guess I shouldn’t be surprised that one of the first things America’s political left would do during the 2016 election post-mortem is to attack minority groups like trans* people, and “identity politics.” That narrative says Americans decided a potential fascist (when you consider his policy proposals, unilateral rhetoric, media manipulation . . . → Read More: Dented Blue Mercedes: Pitting “identity politics” against class struggle is backwards, and the path to self-defeat

Canadian Dimension: Bursting at the Seams

Photo by Matthew Gray

A short video on the crisis of brutal overcrowding in Toronto’s homeless shelters and a call to action.

This video had it’s premiere outside the building where Toronto’s Mayor John Tory lives in somewhat better circumstances. News coverage by NOW, and pictures. See “Ontario’s Austerity Government Sets Basic Income . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Bursting at the Seams

The Canadian Progressive: 119 indigenous Papua New Guinea women seek UN intervention against Barrick Gold abuses

In a move that underscores the need for the Canadian government to act on complaints of human rights abuses committed by Canadian corporations operating overseas, 119 indigenous women who were sexually assaulted by security guards employed by Barrick Gold’s Porgera Joint Venture mine in Porgera, Papua New Guinea, are appealing for the United Nations’ intervention.

. . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: 119 indigenous Papua New Guinea women seek UN intervention against Barrick Gold abuses

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Karen Foster and Tamara Krawchenko discuss how policy can – and should – be designed to improve intergenerational equity: Canada trails far behind other industrialized nations in its attention to intergenerational equity. The country could do far more to report on a carefully defined intergenerational equity, track . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists

You’re a digital rights activists and are struggling to pick the right Halloween costume? Dave Maass, an investigative researcher with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, suggests facial recognition paint, stingrays, privacy badger, patent troll, and certbot. A Guy Fawkes mask would do too.

The post Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists appeared first on . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Halloween costume ideas for Canadian digital rights activists

wmtc: what i’m reading: the underground railroad by colson whitehead

Colson Whitehead is a literary genius. In The Underground Railroad, he has found a way to tell the story of 400-plus years of African-American oppression without delivering an awkward march through history, and without using characters as billboards for ideas.

Instead of linear time, Whitehead employs a geography of time: different eras, different historical . . . → Read More: wmtc: what i’m reading: the underground railroad by colson whitehead

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Scott Sinclair and Stuart Trew applaud Wallonia’s principled stance against the CETA. And Joseph Stiglitz discusses the need to set up social and economic systems which actually serve the public good, rather than favouring corporate interests: Where the trade agreements failed, it was not because the US was . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Dented Blue Mercedes: Free speech, and the cruel shackles of empathy and mutual respect

In Canada, we tend to value freedom of speech very highly, and it’s often said that the best way to counter objectionable speech is with more speech.

That’s the first thought that crosses my mind in the case of U of T professor Jordan Peterson, who declares in a series of . . . → Read More: Dented Blue Mercedes: Free speech, and the cruel shackles of empathy and mutual respect

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Owen Jones highlights the toxic stress and other health problems borne disproportionately by members of the LGBT community who face systematic discrimination. And Tayla Smith and Jaitra Sathyandran discuss how temporary foreign workers (and others facing precarious work situations) tend to suffer preventable harm to their health . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Canada, a welcoming country? The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking

The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking tarnishes Canada’s image as a compassionate and welcoming country. Temporary foreign worker programmes allow employers to violate migrant workers’ rights.

The post Canada, a welcoming country? The unaddressed issue of labour trafficking appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada

David Suzuki on the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and the “hard work and leadership of Indigenous women and communities who have spent decades calling for an inquiry.”

The post David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

. . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada

Canadian Dimension: Water isn’t a human right in Canada, but it should be

Photo by Daniel Zimmermann

In recent months, there has been a brewing controversy over the use, ownership, and commodification of important natural resources like fresh and clean drinking water. And rightfully so, because while Canada has high amounts of fresh water in global terms, the reality of water insecurity is apparent even here, . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: Water isn’t a human right in Canada, but it should be

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Christopher Ingraham points out that while many luxuries are getting cheaper with time, the necessities of life are becoming much more difficult to afford:

Many manufactured goods — like TVs and appliances — come from overseas, where labor costs are cheaper. “International, global competition lowers prices directly from lower-cost imported goods, and indirectly by forcing U.S. manufacturers to behave more competitively, with lower prices, higher quality, better service, et cetera,” Perry said.

On the flip side, things like education and medical care can’t be produced in a factory, so those pressures do not apply. Compounding it, many Americans are insulated from the full costs of these services. Private and public insurance companies pay most medical costs, so there tends to be little incentive for individuals to shop around for cheaper medical care.

In the case of higher education, the nation’s massive student loan industry bears much of the upfront burden of rising prices. To the typical 18-year-old, a $120,000 tuition bill may seem like an abstraction when you don’t have to start paying it off until your mid-20s or later. As a result, the nation’s college students and graduates now collectively owe upward of $1.3 trillion in student loan debt.
“Prices rise when [health care and college] markets are not competitive and not exposed to global competition,” Perry said, “and prices rise when easy credit is available.”

Hence, our current predicament. We can afford the things we don’t need, but we need the things we can’t afford.

– Alex Usher notes how one of the same cost pressures applies in Canada, as universities losing public funding are squeezing students for massive tuition increases. And Lindsay Kines reports that the Clark government’s decision to make life less affordable for people with disabilities in British Columbia has led to 3,500 people giving up their transit passes.

– Natalia Khosla and Sean McElwee discuss the difficulty in addressing racism when many people live in denial of their continued privilege.

– Paul Wells comments on SNC Lavalin’s long track record of illegal corporate donations to the Libs and the Cons.

– Finally, Gerry Caplan points out how Justin Trudeau is dodging key human rights questions. And Mike Blanchfield reports that the Libs’ willingness to undermine a treaty prohibiting the use of cluster bombs represents just another area where they’re leaving the Cons’ most harmful policies untouched. . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- James Stewart examines how Donald Trump could be paying zero taxes using shelters designed specifically to enrich real estate developers while serving no social purpose. And Alexandra Thornton and Brendan Duke po… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Thomas Walkom writes that with both major U.S. presidential candidates taking an understandably skeptical view of free-trade agreements in their current form, Canada shouldn’t be planning on the past trade mo… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.- Stephen Hawking discusses the crucial distinction between seeing money as a means of pursuing worthy ends versus treating it a goal in and of itself – and notes that we should be wary of political choices bas… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Bjarke Skærlund Risager interviews David Harvey about the history and effect of neoliberalism: I’ve always treated neoliberalism as a political project carried out by the corporate capitalist class as they felt i… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- David Dayen highlights the treatment of workers as the most fundamental difference between Scandinavian countries which have achieved both prosperity and social justice, and the U.S. and others which have sacrif… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Canadian Dimension: PEN Canada Surveillance Survey is Now Live

Photo by steve p2008 Contribute to PEN Canada’s study on the impact of surveillance on writers here. How does surveillance impact your work? PEN Canada has joined Canadian Association of Journalists (CAJ… . . . → Read More: Canadian Dimension: PEN Canada Surveillance Survey is Now Live

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Jim Tankersley interviews Joshua Bivens about the relative effects of economic growth and income inequality – and particularly his evidence showing that more people are far better off with more modest growth fairly d… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

wmtc: the greatest, forever. rest in power muhammad ali.

Revolutionary thought of the day, from a revolutionary American.Why should they ask me to put on a uniform and go ten thousand miles from home and drop bombs and bullets on brown people in Vietnam while so-called Negro people in Louisville are treated … . . . → Read More: wmtc: the greatest, forever. rest in power muhammad ali.

Montreal Simon: Now We Know Why the Liberals Don’t Want to Scrap the Saudi Deal

Well it's taken a while, but now we know why the Liberal government is so reluctant to scrap the deal to sell armoured vehicles to Saudi Arabia.Not just because it would cost thousands of jobs, in an area of Canada which has been ravaged by the co… . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: Now We Know Why the Liberals Don’t Want to Scrap the Saudi Deal

The Canadian Progressive: Green Party of Canada asks CRA to revoke Jewish National Fund’s charity status

The Green Party of Canada is calling on the Canada Revenue Agency to revoke the charity status of the Jewish National Fund on the grounds that the organization discriminates against Palestinians and non-Jews in Israel. Also, Israel’s “failure to comp… . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Green Party of Canada asks CRA to revoke Jewish National Fund’s charity status