Accidental Deliberations: Credit where due

I suspect there’s still going to be plenty of room for argument as to how much attention we ought to pay to inequality in the development of economic policy. But let’s give Kevin Milligan and other UBC economists full credit for their observations when prompted by Pete McMartin on issues of inequality and economic structure, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Good riddance

At long last, B.C.’s HST has met its end. Vaughn Palmer reminds us why, while Iglika Ivanova looks at what comes next.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how B.C.’s HST referendum and Wisconsin’s state Senate recalls should rekindle our interest in setting up direct democratic mechanisms to hold governments accountable between elections. No followup links for now since both have been amply covered in the corporate media and the blogosphere alike – but feel free to post any particular favourites ...

Accidental Deliberations: On hollow victories

Sean Holman raises the possibility that Christy Clark and the B.C. Libs may be no better off if they manage to hang onto the HST in the province’s ongoing referendum than if they lose the vote. But I wonder whether it’s worth going a step further. If the vote to axe the HST succeeds despite ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – I’ll join the seemingly long list of commentators who wouldn’t ever have expected to cite David Brooks, but can’t avoid it based on his latest column: Eldar Shafir of Princeton and Sendhil Mullainathan of Harvard have recently, with federal help, been exploring a third theory, that scarcity produces ...