The Progressive Economics Forum: Guaranteed Annual Income

Over at the web site of the Calgary Homeless Foundation, I’ve written a blog post titled “Ten things to know about Canada’s guaranteed annual income debate.” Points raised in the blog post include the following: -There are people and groups on both the left and right of the political spectrum who favour a Guaranteed Annual ...

Northern Reflections: World Of Wonders!

Over the weekend, the Swiss held a referendum in which they rejected a proposal for a guaranteed annual income. Andrew Coyne writes: The model on which the Swiss voted was at the outer limits of what anyone has imagined a basic income could or should entail. At 2,500 Swiss francs a month (about $40,000 a ...

Politics and its Discontents: A Bold Experiment Or A Necessary Support?

The concept of a guaranteed annual income just won’t go away. It is regarded by some as an effective way of addressing the increasingly wide disparities afflicting our society, and reviled by others as an affront to individualism and a disincentive to work. I fall into the former camp, and empirical evidence appears to be ...

Politics and its Discontents: Star Readers On The Guaranteed Annual Income

I write periodically in this blog on the concept of the guaranteed annual income; it seems it would be an effective way of helping to address many of the socio-economic problems we face. As you will see in the first of four letters on the subject from Star readers, not everyone sees it as a ...

Politics and its Discontents: More On The Guaranteed Annual Income

Responding to a recent opinion piece advocating for a guaranteed annual income, Star reader David Gladstone of Toronto has this to offer the crucial role it can play in a world of tremendous change and increasingly precarious employment: It seems the world is never proactive when it comes to preparing for a disaster, whether it ...

Politics and its Discontents: An Idea Gaining Traction

The concept of a guaranteed annual income, a subject I have written about previously on this blog, seems to be gaining traction. A relatively simple way of uplifting countless people from poverty and in the process ultimately saving money through a streamlining of our fragmented systems of social programs, it is now finding interest within ...

Politics and its Discontents: Thinking Beyond The Conventional

We are regularly told, both by governments and their corporate confederates, that these are tough times, and that only patience and a freer hand for business will bring about eventual relief. To the seasoned observer, such a prescription is utter nonsense, of course. Neither an expansion in good-paying jobs nor a contraction of the income ...

Politics and its Discontents: Where Is Help To Be Found?

Over the past several weeks I have been reading a number of letters to the editor from ‘concerned’ citizens about the arrival of Syrian refugees in Canada. Some offer a racist perspective thinly disguised as concern for our fellow Canadians (Instead of helping those people, shouldn’t we be dealing with our own homeless?) while others ...

Cowichan Conversations: Canadian Government To Look Into Guaranteed Annual Income

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger It has been years since the notion of a guaranteed annual income has been seriously discussed in Canada, but that may well change as the costs of administering the social assistance Read more…

Political Eh-conomy: Nope, Alberta still needs to raise the minimum wage

Last night, Andrew Coyne published a column in which he champions introducing a minimum income over raising the minimum wage as a radical policy suggestion for Alberta’s new NDP government. Coyne couches the column in his typical pseudo-contrarianism. Here he is supposedly advocating socialism…gasp! In reality, however, Coyne gets it backwards: a minimum income in Alberta today would almost certainly ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Mason discusses the effect a guaranteed annual income could have on individuals’ choices about labour and employment: A true, subsistence level basic income would close to double [existing social spending in the UK]. But it is imaginable, in the short to medium term, if you factor in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Hugh Segal discusses the need for an open and honest conversation about poverty and how to end it. And to better reflect Canadians’ continued desire for a more fair society, Roderick Benns makes the case for a basic income as Canada’s next major social program. – Matt ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Joan Walsh discusses Elizabeth Warren’s work on improving wages and enhancing the strength of workers in the U.S., while Jeremy Nuttall interviews Hassan Yussuff about the labour movement’s work to elect a better government in Canada. – Bob Hepburn argues that getting rid of the Harper Cons is ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Nathan Schneider discusses the wide range of support for a guaranteed income, while noting that the design of any basic income system needs to reflect the needs of the people who receive it rather than the businesses who see it as an opportunity for themselves. And Art Eggleton ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that to start your year. – Ian Welsh comments on the challenges we face in trying to turn wealth increasingly concentrated in the hands of a few into a better world for everybody: The irony is that we have, again, produced a cornucopia.  We have the potential to create an abundance society, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Daniel Tencer nicely surveys how a guaranteed annual income could work in Canada, as well as the obstacles to putting one in place: Imagine the government started handing out $10,000 annually to every adult in the country, or implemented a negative income tax rate so that low earners ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Mark Bittman discusses the connection between economic and social ills in the U.S., and offers a message which applies equally to Canada: I have spent a great deal of time talking about the food movement and its potential, because to truly change the food system you really have ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Carter Price offers another look at how inequality damages economic development. And the Broadbent Institute examines the wealth gap in Canada – which is already recognized as a serious problem, but also far larger than most people realize: – Paul Buchheit discusses how the U.S. is turning ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, arguing that while Stephen Poloz is indeed thoroughly out of touch in suggesting that people entering the workforce should take on unpaid internships as matters stand now, we should in fact make sure that unpaid work (or study, or other activity) is a viable option for young workers. For further reading…– The CP reports ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Following up on yesterday’s column, Michael Harris offers his take on how Stephen Harper refuses to accept anything short of war as an option: Stephen Harper talks as if this is yet another of those good-versus-evil fables he is always passing off to the public as deep analysis ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Don Pittis makes the case for a guaranteed annual income on economic and social grounds: The young would be some of the biggest beneficiaries. Students could use the money to pay for their education, thus eliminating student loan programs. Students from poor families could afford to take courses ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Andrew Jackson examines the effect of a federal minimum wage – and how it would benefit both workers and employers. – Dylan Matthews offers a primer on a basic income, featuring this on how a secure income has little impact on individuals’ willingness to work: As noted ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Ethan Corey and Jessica Corbett offer five lessons for progressives from Naomi Klein’s forthcoming This Changes Everything. – Following up on this post, Andrew Jackson fact-checks the Fraser Institute on its hostility toward the CPP. And the Winnipeg Free Press goes further in challenging the motives behind ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Why We Need a Guaranteed Annual Income.

It’s been a little while since we last sat down and talked, so I’d like to take the opportunity now to correct that and try to move the conversation forward a little bit. As I mentioned when I posted that we would be re-engaging the blog, there’s a lot of issues going on in our ...

Canadian Political Viewpoints: Why We Need a Guaranteed Annual Income.

It’s been a little while since we last sat down and talked, so I’d like to take the opportunity now to correct that and try to move the conversation forward a little bit. As I mentioned when I posted that we would be re-engaging the blog, there’s a lot of issues going on in our ...