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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Will McMartin highlights the fact that constant corporate tax slashing has done nothing other than hand ever-larger piles of money to businesses who have no idea what to do with it. But Josh Wingrove reports that Justin Trudeau is looking for excuses to keep up the handouts . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Michael Kraus, Shai Davidai and A. David Nussbaum discuss the myth of social mobility in the U.S. And Nicholas Kristof writes that inequality is a choice rather than an inevitability: Yet while we broadly lament inequality, we treat it as some natural disaster imposed upon us. That’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Barrie McKenna takes a look at how the Cons are pushing serious liabilities onto future generations in order to hand out short-term tax baubles within a supposedly-balanced budget, while Jennifer Robson highlights the complete lack of policy merit behind those giveaways. And Ian McGugan writes that even as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Jeffrey Simpson lambastes the Cons’ determination to slash taxes and hand out baubles to the rich for the sole purpose of undermining the fiscal capacity of government to help Canadians. And Jeremy Nuttall highlights how a cuts to the CRA are allowing tax cheats to escape paying their . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Daniel Tencer reports on a couple of important recent warnings that Canada is in danger of following the U.S. down the path of extreme corporatism and inequality: Speaking at a fundraiser for the left-leaning Broadbent Institute, Reich said Canada is facing the same inequality-growing “structural problems” that . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Zoe Williams interviews George Lakoff about the need for progressive activists and parties to work on changing minds rather than merely pursuing an elusive (and illusory) middle ground: (T)he left, he argues, is losing the political argument – every year, it cedes more ground to the right, under the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

CuriosityCat: Alberta Floods: Will this be Stephen Harper’s Katrina Moment?

Remember PM Harper’s  response to the 2007 Financial Meltdown? 

His seeming inability to understand that when crises hit, Canadians expect their federal government to help them? His discussion of the implosion of share prices as being a good time to buy stocks (while many Canadians watched in disbelief their dreams of a decent retirement . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Alberta Floods: Will this be Stephen Harper’s Katrina Moment?

Death By Trolley: Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought

I am currently reading Philosophy in the Flesh: The embodied mind and its challenge to Western thought. Authored by Cognitive Scientists George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, this book asks 1) What do major lines of Western philosophical thought assume about the mind? 2) What has cognitive science learned about the mind through rigorous research? 3) . . . → Read More: Death By Trolley: Philosophy in the Flesh: The Embodied Mind and its Challenge to Western Thought

CuriosityCat: Do Canada’s rightwingers swoon over Policy Wonks, Pretty Faces or Daddy Figures?

Sarah Hampson

We seem to have a conflict between three theories of what motivates conservatives to vote. 

On the one hand, we have the school of thought that says there is a beauty premium reaped by the more beautiful people in life, business and politics. The second school believes that voters in the US . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Do Canada’s rightwingers swoon over Policy Wonks, Pretty Faces or Daddy Figures?

CuriosityCat: Justin Trudeau & The Ibbitson Question: Lessons from George Lakoff

John Ibbitson questions whether Canadians will follow the values that Justin Trudeau represents, and concludes that there is much mushiness which bodes ill for the Liberal Party under the younger Trudeau: The Ibbitson Question

Both political strategist Warren Kinsella (Fight the Right) and former journalist Paul Adams (Power Trap) have new books exploring what . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Justin Trudeau & The Ibbitson Question: Lessons from George Lakoff

CuriosityCat: Carbon Tax, Cap & Trade, Framing: When will Thomas Mulcair learn?

Stephen Harper, the one party leader who probably reads a chapter from George Lakoff’s magnificent work Don’t Think of an Elephant each night before he switches off the light, dragged an elephant into the House this week, and smiled contentedly as the man who wants his job kept flailing away at the elephant. What was . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Carbon Tax, Cap & Trade, Framing: When will Thomas Mulcair learn?

Dead Wild Roses: Health Care in the US – Retaking Political Discourse – George Lakoff

Why does the progressive movement keep on suffering set backs when they are quantifably right on the issues. George Lakoff suggests it has much to do with framing and how human cognition works. A great lecture, well worth the 60 minutes of your time.

Filed under: Politics, Science Tagged: Cognitivie Science, George Lakoff, Healthcare, . . . → Read More: Dead Wild Roses: Health Care in the US – Retaking Political Discourse – George Lakoff

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Carol Goar comments on the CEP/CAW plan to merge and work toward a far more active type of unionism: Both the CAW and the CEP — of which I am a member — gobbled up smaller unions to reach their current size. But neither achieved the critical . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: A Healthy Society – Chapter 9 Discussion

In his conclusion to A Healthy Society, Ryan Meili sums up his overall message about how health can serve as the central theme for political organization, and notes that the message holds plenty of public appeal already (with further room to grow as people learn about the impact of policy on the broad definition of . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: A Healthy Society – Chapter 9 Discussion

CuriosityCat: Bob Rae asks Liberals to do something stupid: Fight fire with fire

Stephen Harper, his coffers brimming with cash donated through skillful use of the expensive and effective CIMS voter contact database, tossed a few dollars into the hopper and came out with some nice black and white ads which talked about how big a failure Bob Rae had been as premier of Ontario during a deep . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Bob Rae asks Liberals to do something stupid: Fight fire with fire