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Peace, order and good government, eh?: Leave Vic Toews alooooooone!

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews wants an investigation.

Public Safety Minister Vic Toews is calling for an investigation into how his divorce records ended up on Twitter.

Toews has been targeted in an online campaign related to the introduction of a surveillance bill which gives authorities easier access to people’s Internet lives.

An investigation by . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Leave Vic Toews alooooooone!

the woodshed: We spent a billion dollars for this?

Note that most of these people were arrested in pre-dawn raids BEFORE the G20 demonstrations began, thanks to the use of infiltrators and police spies and agents provocateurs. And it cost taxpayers about a billion dollars, not including the fake lake and Tony Clement’s gazebo.obviously these 17 people posed an serious existential threat to country . . . → Read More: the woodshed: We spent a billion dollars for this?

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Just say no to "extraordinary anti-terror powers"

It was reported yesterday that the Harper Government™ (apparently they really do want to be called that) intends to bring back a couple of "extraordinary anti-terror powers for police": preventative detention and compulsory (and secret) testimony. These are measures which were part of the original Canadian response to 9/11 but were allowed to sunset in 2007 because the Conservatives couldn’t get enough opposition support to keep them in force. The Ottawa Citizen has published an unsigned editorial opposing the measures and makes the obvious observation: The actions of police at the G20 summit in Toronto last year, when more than 900 people were arrested during a single weekend, showed that even in a well-governed and free country such as Canada, we can never simply trust that authorities will use extraordinary powers appropriately. In the last few years, police forces have not demonstrated that Canadians should entrust them with more power; if anything, they have eroded confidence in their judgment. If anything, that’s understated. In the last few years the media have been full of stories involving law enforcement and intelligence agents who have abused the authority they already have and sometimes demonstrated gross incompetence in the process. Mostly, they investigate… . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Just say no to "extraordinary anti-terror powers"

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Has anyone spoken to John Baird lately?

In the immediate aftermath of the Auditor General’s report on G8 spending, we were assured that while the attention to administrative detail was lacking, there was certainly no intention to mislead parliament. We were also assured that while Tony Clement was heavily involved in considering all the projects in his riding, it was John Baird who made the final decisions. The auditor general’s other major concern is that there is no paper trail to show how or why the 32 projects were chosen out of 242 that were proposed by the municipalities. Wiersema said they were selected by the infrastructure minister at the time, Baird, based on the advice of Clement, who was then industry minister and is now president of the Treasury Board. No public servants were involved in the decision-making process, the audit found. Of course we’ve since learned that public servants were involved — the documents obtained and released by the NDP make it clear that bureaucrats from Industry Canada, Infrastructure Canada and DFAIT were all involved at one point or another. What’s now unclear is just how much John Baird was actually involved, despite the fact that Clement himself assured us his colleague made the final… . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Has anyone spoken to John Baird lately?

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mostly competent government

Since the Harper Government™ spent as much money on security for 2010’s G8/G20 summits as any other ten countries would have, you’d think they’d at least have earned high marks for, you know, security. You’d be wrong. An internal RCMP review says the Conservative government’s choice of Ontario cottage country as the 2010 G8 Summit venue offered would-be snipers "ideal conditions" to assassinate a world leader. It says the hilly, wooded terrain around Huntsville, Ont., featured not only excellent vantage points for gunmen, but covered approaches for intruders, and problematic land and water routes leading in and out of the area. … It also says the decision to host the G20 Summit in Toronto immediately afterwards "added a significant planning challenge" that prompted a "complete re-examination of the G8 Summit security." And here I thought security was one of those areas that ranked right up there with the economy as a core competency of Conservatives. The editorial board at the Globe and Mail must be so proud…. . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mostly competent government

Peace, order and good government, eh?: QOTD: The Worst Outcome of G20 Policing

This is just one paragraph plucked out of the middle of a long post at A Canadian Lefty in Occupied Land. The post makes the case for this conclusion and then goes on to a thoughtful discussion about where activists go from there. This sums up something important and it comes at a time when the actions of the police last June are once again in the headlines. The worst thing about the policing at the G20 summit was that it delivered both a symbolic and a material message to keep us passive and inert precisely in anticipation of this moment when a majority Harper government could begin amping up its attacks on ordinary people. The messages were "protesters are dangerous" and "protest is risky." The brutality then was to encourage as many people as possible now to stay home. Elites want us to mistrust the people who are saying, "We can do something about this if we do it together." They want us to look at the billy clubs and the tear gas and the sexual harassment and the rape threats and all the rest of the nastiness from the cops and say, "Yeah, this Harper stuff sucks, but… . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: QOTD: The Worst Outcome of G20 Policing

Liberal Video Depot: It’s time to stop the Stephen Harper Gravy Train

Where’s Rob Ford when you need him.{Video by liberalvideo}Please send LVD your political and news videos and clips. . . . → Read More: Liberal Video Depot: It’s time to stop the Stephen Harper Gravy Train

Liberal Video Depot: It’s time to stop the Stephen Harper Gravy Train

Where’s Rob Ford when you need him.{Video by liberalvideo}

Please send LVD your political and news videos and clips.

A. Picazo: At The G8, Refusing To Be Silenced On Women’s Rights

A Monday gathering of Canadian and international women’s rights experts on Parliament Hill was intended to discuss Canada’s role in the maternal and child health initiative at the upcoming G8 summit; To voice their concerns over the erosion of gender equality and women’s rights in foreign policy under Stephen Harper, and address the omission of . . . → Read More: A. Picazo: At The G8, Refusing To Be Silenced On Women’s Rights

A. Picazo: Stephen Harper’s Maternal Health Disaster

In what is arguably an effort to win over fundamentalist Christian voters, Stephen Harper’s G8 maternal and child health initiative, as it currently stands, will result in far more preventable deaths than the overall number of lives saved. In what Huffington Post contributor Jodi Jacobson called an “absurd move,” Harper initially excluded family planning from . . . → Read More: A. Picazo: Stephen Harper’s Maternal Health Disaster