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wmtc: in which i test a bit of conventional wisdom and find out is in false: the mystery of roman tuna salad

I’ve noticed that ideas that I used to blog about, I am now posting on Facebook instead — a combination of laziness and time pressure. I’m going to try to get the ideas here, first.Conventional wisdom has it that preparing food at home is less expensi… . . . → Read More: wmtc: in which i test a bit of conventional wisdom and find out is in false: the mystery of roman tuna salad

wmtc: in which i test a bit of conventional wisdom and find out it is false: the mystery of roman tuna salad

I’ve noticed that ideas that I used to blog about, I am now posting on Facebook instead — a combination of laziness and time pressure. I’m going to try to get the ideas here, first.Conventional wisdom has it that preparing food at home is less expensi… . . . → Read More: wmtc: in which i test a bit of conventional wisdom and find out it is false: the mystery of roman tuna salad

wmtc: what i’m reading: salt sugar fat by michael moss

Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us by Michael Moss is an excellent addition to a bookshelf that includes works by Michael Pollan, Eric Schlosser, Marian Nestle and others who write about the health of our food and the un-health of the industrial food system. Moss lifts the curtain on the giant . . . → Read More: wmtc: what i’m reading: salt sugar fat by michael moss

wmtc: rtod

Revolutionary thought of the day: Hunger isn’t about the amount of food around. It’s about being able to afford and control that food. After all, the U.S. has more food than it knows what to do with, and still 50 million people are food insecure.

Raj Patel, author of Stuffed and Starved and The Value . . . → Read More: wmtc: rtod

wmtc: mini-garden update: the eggplant arrives

I grew this! It’s eight inches long, and three more are on the way.

What’s ordinary to you veteran gardeners is still miraculous to me. Gardening on a small scale is easy, fun, and very rewarding.

Next stop, eggplant recipes.

. . . → Read More: wmtc: mini-garden update: the eggplant arrives

wmtc: zucchini abundance recipe of the day: zucchini-corn-tomato bake

I found a bunch of recipes similar to this, and adapted them to my tastes. This one is easy (especially if you use a food processor to shred the zucchini and cheese), healthy, and tasty.

I feel like the ability to tweak and change recipes marks a turning point in my cooking evolution, in . . . → Read More: wmtc: zucchini abundance recipe of the day: zucchini-corn-tomato bake

wmtc: zucchini abundance recipe of the day: penne with zucchini and fresh herbs

This is probably the easiest way to use zucchini from your garden, and if you’re growing herbs, it’s an excuse to use those, too. It’s also one of those dishes that takes just about anything you like in pasta. I’m keeping it very simple, so as not to drown out the zucchini. I use . . . → Read More: wmtc: zucchini abundance recipe of the day: penne with zucchini and fresh herbs

wmtc: zucchini abundance recipe of the day: zucchini fritters

Apparently if you grow zucchini, you have too much of it.

Being new gardeners, we didn’t know how prolific our one zucchini plant would be, or the insane quantities – and size! – of the vegetables it would produce. And those leaves! They’re gigantic and there’s so many of them! It’s been a source of . . . → Read More: wmtc: zucchini abundance recipe of the day: zucchini fritters

wmtc: for those who believe meat-eating can be ethical: in praise of beretta farms

I’ve mentioned Beretta Farms in many different posts over the years, but I’ve never specifically blogged about them. With grilling season underway, it’s time to give Beretta a shout-out.

When I learned about the horrors of factory farming, first from reading Michael Pollan, and later through other sources, I knew I needed to change my . . . → Read More: wmtc: for those who believe meat-eating can be ethical: in praise of beretta farms

wmtc: this year’s garden and diego’s new favourite food

Three years ago, we planted our first-ever garden, really a tiny garden-ette, growing two tomato plants and some daisies. (I had forgotten about the flowers til I saw that older post.)

I really enjoyed growing the vegetables, and was surprised and pleased to learn that it wasn’t very time-consuming, at least not on this level. . . . → Read More: wmtc: this year’s garden and diego’s new favourite food

wmtc: the gluten-free hoax: nutritionism run amok

Today I saw a bag of high-end cheese puffs, made with organic corn and real cheese. WHEAT FREE and GLUTEN FREE, the package boasted, which made me chuckle. Yup, just like all cheese puffs for all time. Like most snack food, cheese puffs are made of corn, and corn does not contain gluten.

Marketing old . . . → Read More: wmtc: the gluten-free hoax: nutritionism run amok

wmtc: is the food movement elitist? michael pollan connects the dots between labour and our tables

In an excellent interview in Truthout, Michael Pollan responds to critics who accuse the food movement of being elitist. He very rightly credits Eric Schlosser’s Fast Food Nation with explicitly drawing the connection between labour issues, animal issues, and our own food issues. And Pollan calls out the industrialized food industry that has been able . . . → Read More: wmtc: is the food movement elitist? michael pollan connects the dots between labour and our tables

wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: i finally make delicious lentil soup, thanks to you

Last summer, I asked for help in turning my drab lentil soup into something more yummy and enticing. Thanks to wmtc readers, I’ve done it. Yesterday for the first time, I made lentil soup that I will actually look forward to eating (as opposed to tolerating because I made it and don’t want to throw . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: i finally make delicious lentil soup, thanks to you

wmtc: a small green victory: more plastics now recyclable in peel

Yes! A few years back, I blogged about discovering that many of the plastics I had been putting in my recycling bin were not, in fact, recyclable. A few months after that, I unpacked a typical environmental dilemma: organic lettuce.

Organic lettuce is the perfect example of a green paradox. It’s unquestionably better for the local . . . → Read More: wmtc: a small green victory: more plastics now recyclable in peel

wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: help me make delicious lentil soup

The healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week – now running about every-other week – has hit a snag: lentil soup. I love lentil soup, but my own is turning out just OK, not really delicious.

After the first try was too bland, Stephanie suggested using allspice and more bay leaves. Excellent idea! I upped . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: help me make delicious lentil soup

wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: chicken in wine with sun-dried tomatoes

When it comes to soups and stews, there is a seemingly endless number of variables that can be changed to create new variations of any given dish. If you like chicken stew, for example, you could experiment with different combinations of vegetables, different seasonings, better (or quicker) stocks, fresh herbs – and then with . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: chicken in wine with sun-dried tomatoes

wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: sausage and three-bean stew

Whether this recipe qualifies as healthy depends on whether you think sausage can be part of a healthy diet. I buy sausage that is made from local, organically raised turkey and free of preservatives. The sausage is slightly higher in saturated fat than skinless chicken breast, but way lower in fat than pork sausage. Plus . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: sausage and three-bean stew

wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: beef, barley, and mushroom stew

This week’s healthy slow-cooker recipe features barley, a yummy and healthy grain. I especially love the chewy texture.

Barley is one of the four oldest grains to be cultivated by humans.* Unfortunately, whole-grain barley is difficult to find. The more common pearl barley is not a whole grain. I haven’t found a convenient place . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: beef, barley, and mushroom stew

wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: vegetarian chili

This has turned out to be one of our favourite slow-cooker meals. It’s delicious, incredibly easy to make, super healthy, and inexpensive. Adapted from nowhere: it’s my own.

Canned beans, properly rinsed and drained, have the same nutritional value as dried beans. They’re much easier to use and work well with the slow cooker. . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow-cooker recipe of the week: vegetarian chili

wmtc: healthy slow cooker recipe of the week: thai peanut chicken

In defiance of current internet rules, I am posting this on my own blog instead of on Pinterest – but please feel free to share this on Pinterest if you like.

I’m going to post one slow-cooker recipe each week until I run out of ideas.

Thai Peanut Chicken, adapted from The 150 . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy slow cooker recipe of the week: thai peanut chicken

wmtc: updates: acupuncture, slow cooker, star trek

I decided to try acupuncture again. In October, I saw my nephew and niece-in-law who practice Traditional Chinese Medicine and other holistic healing methods. They encouraged me to use our small insurance benefit on more treatment, even though I can’t afford to continue it past that.

I purposely started in December, so I . . . → Read More: wmtc: updates: acupuncture, slow cooker, star trek

wmtc: post your slow-cooker recipes and tips here

I just bought a slow-cooker, the first one I’ve owned. Do you use one? If so, what are your favourite things to make with it? Any tips or suggestions? I know there a zillion slow-cooker recipes online, but I’d like to hear what friends and readers like. Thanks! . . . → Read More: wmtc: post your slow-cooker recipes and tips here

wmtc: healthy eating costs more. fact or fiction?

Conventional wisdom has it that healthy foods cost more than junk food, that buying and preparing nutritious food is more expensive than eating processed food. How many people bemoan the supposed fact that low-income people cannot afford to eat healthfully: “When carrots are less expensive than chips, then everyone will have access to a healthy . . . → Read More: wmtc: healthy eating costs more. fact or fiction?

wmtc: mcdonalds is not healthy for pit bulls and other living things

In case you missed it, the marketing geniuses at McDonald’s thought it was cute to promote their latest concoction of fat, salt, sugar, and unpronounceable ingredients as being healthier than petting a dog. But not just any dog. Trying a brand new menu item at McDonald’s isn’t risky. You know what’s risky? Petting a stray . . . → Read More: wmtc: mcdonalds is not healthy for pit bulls and other living things

wmtc: five items in search of a post (a list of sorts)

This has been a strange winter break. I’ve been working at the library, collaborating with Allan on some paid writing work, taking care of the massive number of appointments and personal chores that pile up while I’m in school, seeing a few friends… but also making sure I spend a fair amount of time on . . . → Read More: wmtc: five items in search of a post (a list of sorts)