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The Common Sense Canadian: Heiltsuk Nation occupies DFO office in face of expected herring fishery

Heiltsuk Nation members confront DFO officers at Denny Island coast guard station (Pacific Wild)

Tensions continue to escalate on the waters of the Great Bear Rainforest over a highly controversial herring fishery, as members of the Heiltsuk Nation are now occupying the local DFO office in opposition to a planned gillnet opening.

A group of Heiltsuk youth, elders and chiefs paddled and boated this afternoon from Bella Bella to the coast guard station on nearby Denny Island – headquarters of DFO’s central coast operations – to deliver an eviction notice reminding local representatives that Area 7 is a no-go zone for a commercial herring fishery (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On common ground

The Progress Summit’s panel on First Nations has included plenty of discussion of the need to identify commonalities between First Nation issues and other groups within Canada. And I’d add that there are plenty more opportunities to draw further connections.

The recognition that the federal government tried to eradicate aboriginal culture (and celebration of that fact that it failed) can surely be linked to the latest attempts to intrude on individual beliefs and practices. And the development gap between First Nations and Canada at large is largely paralleled by a similar divide between other rural or isolated communities which are (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: ‘By any means necessary’: Heiltsuk vow to stop herring gillnet fishery

The Heiltsuk Nation is vowing to stop DFO’s opening of a gillnet fishery amid threatened herring stocks in Area 7 by “any means necessary”, after DFO refused to listen to leaders’ concerns in emergency talks yesterday afternoon.

The gillnet fishery comes in the wake of a highly controversial seine fishery in the same central coast region this past weekend. Said Chief Counsellor Marilyn Slett:

We are saddened that it has come to this, but we cannot stand by while DFO uses flawed science to destroy a resource we have depended on for thousands of years…If we don’t protect the herring, (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: First Nation taking herring concerns to Jimmy Pattison’s Canfisco

Commercial seine boat in Spiller Channel (Pacific Wild)

Bella Bella, BC

A delegation of Heiltsuk First Nations and their supporters will be taking the central coast community’s concerns over a recent herring fishery in their territory to to the Jimmy Pattison-owned Canfisco processing plant in Vancouver this afternoon.

Pattison is the largest owner of commercial herring licences and boats in BC, many of which took part in a highly controversial herring seine opening on Sunday and Monday in Spiller Channel, near Bella Bella. Heiltsuk members were caught by off guard when DFO opened the commercial seine fishery Sunday night without advising them first. The (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: DFO uses stealth to open herring fishery despite First Nations ban

Heiltsuk Hereditary Chief Harvey Humchitt in 2012 (Damien Gillis)

The Department of Fisheries and Oceans angered members of the Heiltsuk First Nation on BC’s central coast by opening a commercial herring fishery last night – despite the community’s insistence that there should be no fishery this year, based on unhealthy stocks.

“This action shows blatant disrespect of aboriginal rights by DFO and industry,” said Chief Councillor Marilyn Slett.

DFO provided inconsistent and misleading communications throughout the day and did not attempt meaningful consultation.

The nation is also suggesting that DFO employed deceptive tactics to launch the fishery, waiting until commercial (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: First Nation tells DFO it’s closing commercial herring fishery

Central Coast herring (Photo: Pacific Wild)

Read this March 20 story from the Canadian Press on the Heiltsuk First Nation’s move to close DFO’s planned commercial herring fishery on the central coat this year.

BELLA BELLA – The latest British Columbia First Nation to condemn herring roe harvesting in its territory says it is closing a commercial fishery as it undertakes its own analysis of fish stocks.

The Heiltsuk Nation on B.C.’s Central Coast says it has given the federal government notice that it will not allow the fishery to open this year because stocks are too weak (Read more…)

Scott's DiaTribes: Carolyn Bennett, Danielle Takacs & Liberal candidates visit Six Nations for tour, roundtable

Yesterday, Liberal MP and Aboriginal Affairs Critic Carolyn Bennett visited Brantford-Brant riding for the whole day to participate in discussions on Native Housing issues as well as to tour Six Nations and New Credit territory (though she’s been here so many times, Chief Ava Hill of Six Nations said Ms Bennett could have probably lead the tour herself) and then to participate in a “listening” roundtable, where Six Nations leaders and people could express their issues and concerns.

Ms Bennett was accompanied by Brantford-Brant Liberal candidate Danielle Takacs for the whole day, and later on for the tour and roundtable, (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Tens of thousands expected to protest Harper’s Bill C-51 today

As many as 83,000 people are expected to take to the streets of Canada today to protest Bill C-51, Stephen Harper’s proposed “secret police” legislation.

The post Tens of thousands expected to protest Harper’s Bill C-51 today appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

CuriosityCat: First Nations & Pipelines: Diplomat kickstarts meaningful discussion of terms

Robert Hage

Today’s Globe & Mail has this article about pipelines in Canada. Former Canadian diplomat Robert Hage is urging the federal, Alberta and B.C. governments to work together to get public and First Nations support for the controversial Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline project. Robert Hage is to  be recommended for his thoughtful analysis of the problem with the Gateway project, and pipelines in general, and for his reasoned recommendation that an independent group, funded by the oil industry, opine on the environmental safeguards needed once pipelines are in fact built. In backing a fresh look at upgraders (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Bill C-51 will allow police to “persecute First Nations protesters”: Chief

Chief Lloyd Oronhiakhète Phillips of the Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke last week informed Harper that Bill C-51 would be used “to brand legitimate protests by First Nations as acts of terrorism.”

The post Bill C-51 will allow police to “persecute First Nations protesters”: Chief appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Common Sense Canadian: Landmark Treaty 8 lawsuit challenges Site C Dam, LNG

A sweeping lawsuit filed this week by the Blueberry River First Nations from northeast BC threatens the province’s resource agenda – including the proposed Site C Dam and shale gas and LNG development.

As a party to Treaty 8, the First Nation was guaranteed the right to continue practicing its traditional way of life on the land, but that promise has been repeatedly broken over the last century, the suit alleges. An time lapse map presented by the nation at a press conference in Vancouver yesterday graphically demonstrates how over 90% of critical watersheds have been heavily industrialized since 1950.

Chief Marvin Yahey calls (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: Podcast: First Nations and the political economy of land

https://politicalehconomy.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/podcast-150306-first-nations.mp3

 

This episode looks at the political economy of land in Canada and the Canadian state’s relationship with First Nations as mediated by land. I’m happy to bring together two guests who deal extensively with these issues and pose challenges to rethink the way land is governed.

My first guest is Hayden King, Anishinaabe from Beausoleil First Nation in Ontario and director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Toronto’s Ryerson University. He joined me to discuss his recent piece in the Globe and Mail on land and the institutions that govern it.

My second guest (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Premier Wall Takes Potshot at First Nations Leaders’ Pay #skpoli

.@TDellerCBC I'd have to agree with the FSIN leader that @PremierBradWall took a pot shot at leaders' pay, rather than offering to help.

— John Klein (@JohnKleinRegina) March 4, 2015

The Premier said:

“It underscores the need for leadership at the local level, including — and let’s be clear — including on the part of chiefs and council,” he said.

“We also saw a report on the fact that chiefs and council in this province and right across the country get paid, as they should, for their services and some of them get paid a lot. You know, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Armine Yalnizyan counters the Cons’ spin on tax-free savings accounts. And Rob Carrick points out that raising the limit on TFSAs would forfeit billions of desperately-needed dollars to benefit only the wealthiest few in Canada: TFSAs are Swiss army knives – a financial knife, corkscrew, screwdriver and more. But doubling the annual contribution limit of $5,500 is a bad idea.

Message to the federal government: Please don’t, because we can’t afford it.…A report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer this week says the federal government would lose $14.7-billion a year in (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, condensing this post on the risks of allowing CSIS to self-assess the scope of Canadians’ Charter rights under C-51.

For further reading…- Again, the go-to source for analysis of C-51 is Craig Forcese and Kent Roach’s site here. – Clayton Ruby and Nader Hasan’s analysis is here.- John Mueller and Mark Stewart duly reject the attempt to invent some existential terrorist threat. – Dale Smith muses about the Cons’ rush to ram C-51 through without analysis here. PressProgress challenges the conventional wisdom as to the supposed popularity of the bill here. And the Star appeals for (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Regina demands missing, murdered aboriginal women inquiry

Regina city council has added its voice to the growing call for a national inquiry into the crisis of 1,200 murdered and missing aboriginal women in Canada.

The post Regina demands missing, murdered aboriginal women inquiry appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Group Letter Urged Obama To Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Hundreds of First Nation leaders, environmentalists, land owners, musicians, authors, actors and artists signed letter urging Obama to veto Keystone XL pipeline.

The post Group Letter Urged Obama To Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Danyaal Raza highlights how Canadians can treat an election year as an opportunity to discuss the a focus on social health with candidates and peers alike: Health providers are increasingly recognizing that while a robust health care system is an important part of promoting Canadians’ health, so is the availability of affordable housing, decent work, and a tightly knit social safety net. Upstream-focused clinical interventions, like the income security program available where I practice, are increasingly meeting that need – but no such program works in a vacuum.…Thinking differently requires speaking differently. (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: Looking for Heroes?

I’ve been watching The Book of Negroes this week. I have no words. I only recognize justice, integrity, brutality, acknowledgement, witnessing, story telling and a myriad of other foggy responses.

It’s easy to also ponder qualities of heroes.

Then I read this from earlier this week, and nodded. Do you get it?

Anishinabe Women Protest Energy East Pipeline on Family Day

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 16, 2015

‘Protect the Water, For Future Generations’: Message being shared today with local families, starting at Market Square at noon.

Kenora—Dozens of Anishinabe Women, their families, and supporters converge today on Market Square at (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Jacques Peretti discusses how corporate elites rewrote our social contract in a concerted effort to the inequality we’re fighting today – and suggests it’s well past time to push back in the name of moral economics: Politicians have now, as then, conspired in their own diminishment — outsourcing foreign policy to Washington, saying there’s nothing we can do about global capitalism.

But it’s not up to them, it’s up to us to be uncompromisingly moral at a moment when the criminal immorality of 30 years of misguided economic policy has been revealed.

The (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Doug Saunders observes that Syriza’s strong election victory may signal a sea change as to whether austerity is inevitable, while Adnan Al-Daini notes that the financial sector can no longer take for granted that its profits will be placed above the interests of actual people. Which means that Joe Oliver may get even more lonely lecturing Canada’s provinces that the economic beatings will continue until morale improves.

- Speaking of whom, Canadians for Tax Fairness highlights how Oliver has long known that the Cons’ income splitting plans represent nothing more than a (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: You Deserve Better Wages and Benefits

Right wingers want to pay no tax. It’s hard to bleat about that in public without sounding like the greedy, selfish people they are.

Instead, they say that public sector workers are paid too much, and that we should privatize everything. THAT way, governments get to starve themselves to the point where they collect virtually no taxes.

Instead of letting rapacious corporations dictate what market wages should be, we should explore living wages, then dream up a world not so different from ours when private sector workers make the stable wages and benefits of public sector workers.

Dream with me, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Will Hutton writes about the connection between inequality and the loss of any moral or social purpose in public life: Britain is beset by a crisis of purpose. We don’t know who we are any longer, where we are going or even if there is a “we”. The country is so passionately attached to past glories because there are so few to celebrate in the present. The crisis is compounded since we have been told for 30 years that the route to universal wellbeing is to abandon the expense of justice (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Larry Elliott writes that at least some business leaders are paying lip service to the idea that inequality needs to be reined in. But Alec Hogg points out that at least some of the privileged few are using their obscene wealth to remove themselves from the rest of humanity, rather than lifting a finger to help anybody else.

- Meanwhile, Joseph Stiglitz observes that sheer stubborn stupidity on the part of austerians is doing untold damage to the global economy. But Jon Henley notes that in advance of Syriza’s election victory, a new (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Crawford Kilian writes that growing inequality has been largely the product of deliberate engineering rather than any natural process, while Paul Krugman focuses on the preferential treatment of capital income in particular. And Simon Barrow discusses the sources and beneficiaries of the increasing wealth gap: (T)he anti-change interests arrayed against any attempt to substantially reform global finance, block the privileging of huge corporate interests (TTIP being a prime example), ensure labour rights, address income and wealth gaps, stop tax evasion and tax dodging by the wealthiest on an industrial scale, legally enshrine transparency (Read more…)