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Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- The Equality Trust reminds us that economic inequality leads to harmful health consequences even for the lucky few at the top of the income scale. And Matt Bruenig observes that a basic income would provide workers with far more scope to avoid employer abuses and other stressors.

- The Council of Canadians points out how the Trans-Pacific Partnership could block any path toward a national pharmacare plan and more fair prescription drug prices. And Andy Blatchford highlights the secrecy surrounding the agreement even as it should be the subject of electoral scrutiny.

- (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Lax Kw’alaams claim on Lelu Island could sink Petronas’ LNG project

Lelu Island and Flora Bank (foreground) – site of controversial proposed LNG plant (Skeena Watershed Conservation Soc.)

Read this September 18 Vancouver Sun story on a claim by the Lax Kw’alaams First Nation to Lelu Island – the controversial site for Petronas’ planned LNG terminal in the Skeena Estuary near Prince Rupert.

The Lax Kw’alaams First Nation is seeking aboriginal title to Lelu Island and Flora Bank in order to force changes to the Pacific NorthWest LNG proposal, casting further doubt on the $36-billion LNG export project.

Lax Kw’alaams leader Gary Reece said in an interview Friday that while (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Kevin Carmichael compares the federal parties’ promises to help parents and concludes the NDP’s child care plan to hold far more social and economic benefit, while Natascia Lypny likewise finds that parents are more interested in actual affordable child-care spaces than tax baubles. CTV reports on the NDP’s promise to extend parental leave under EI as an added help to new parents. And David MacDonald offers five reasons why we need to ensure better opportunities for indigenous families and children.

- Nathan Liewicki reports on the Council of Canadians’ town hall on protecting (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Roheena Saxena points out that personal privilege tends to correlate to selfishness in distributing scarce resources. And that in turn may explain in part why extreme top-end wealth isn’t even mentioned in a new inequality target under development by the UN.

- Or, for that matter, the Calgary Board of Education’s continued provision of free lunches to executives while students lack food and supplies. Meanwhile, Laurie Monsebraaten reports on the spread of hunger in Toronto’s suburbs, while Karena Walter points out the need for more action on poverty in Canada’s federal election.

- (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Jordan Brennan details (and expands on) how corporate tax cuts have served solely to further enrich the people and businesses who already had the most: (F)ar from improving economic outcomes, there is evidence to suggest that corporate income tax reductions depressed Canadian GDP growth. I present a detailed explanation of why that’s the case in a forthcoming study to be published by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. Given the election debate around raising the CIT rate, I thought it worthwhile to summarize my findings.

In my study I contrast three Canadian (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Tsartlip First Nation blasts Steelhead LNG over proposed Saanich project

Tsartlip Chief Don Tom opposing another unwanted project – construction of a luxury home on burial grounds

The Tsartlip First Nation on southern Vancouver Island is weighing in on a proposed LNG project for the Saanich Inlet – pouring cold water on an August 20 announcement by proponent Steelhead LNG touting the support of the neighbouring Malahat Nation. Both groups are jumping the gun, warns Tsartlip Chief Don Tom:

Tsartlip has requested a meeting with Steelhead LNG and it will take place onSeptember 11th. We intend on making it clear that Tsartlip First Nation’s approval will be required for any LNG (Read more…)

centre of the universe: Transparency?

I don’t think that word means what you think it means. We just passed the deadline by which First Nations bands are required by the Federal Government to disclosed audited financial statements. The audited financial statements must be accompanied by a separate schedule which details the salaries for Chiefs and councillors. There are some good […]

A Different Point of View....: National voter support campaign could mean the end for Harper

The primary objective of Stephen Harper’s new absurdly-named Fair Elections Act  is to prevent hundreds-of-thousands of Canadians from voting for the NDP, Liberals, Greens, etc.

The Conservatives are, in effect, “cheating” the electoral process again, just as blatantly as in the past. They know that a large number of people – students, marginalized people and First Nations – will have a hard time voting because of the changes. It’s also likely they would not vote Conservative.

If this latest unprincipled scheme works, it could be a major factor in allowing the Conservatives to sneak in the back door with a minority victory. It’s possible that, come election day, the opinion polls could show both the NDP and Liberals ahead of Harper but Harper winning the election.

Volunteer for – one of dozens of NGOs working to defeat the Conservatives. 

The Council of Canadians contends that some 770,000 people may . . . → Read More: A Different Point of View….: National voter support campaign could mean the end for Harper

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Jim Stanford, Iglika Ivanova and David MacDonald each highlight how there’s far more to be concerned about in Canada’s economy beyond the GDP dip alone. Both Thomas Walkom and the Star’s editorial board write that it’s clear the Cons have nothing to offer when it comes to trying to improve on our current stagnation, while Balbulican notes that the Cons’ economic message amounts to little more than denial. And David Climenhaga calls out the laughable attempt by Alberta’s right wing to shield Stephen Harper from blame for a decade of failed federal (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Energy East: “Treaty and Aboriginal rights must be respected”

Energy East must respect treaty and Aboriginal rights, says the Ontario Energy Board in its just-released review of TransCanada’s proposed pipeline.

The post Energy East: “Treaty and Aboriginal rights must be respected” appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Dana Flavelle examines how many Canadians are facing serious economic insecurity. And Kevin Campbell discusses how the Cons are vulnerable on the economy due to their obvious failure to deliver on their promises, as well as their misplaced focus on trickle-down ideology: During this election it is essential to understand that we live in an era of persistent financial insecurity among the majority of the population. Household balance sheets are in a tenuous state throughout the industrialized world, particularly in Canada. This inevitably affects how citizens choose to vote. Healthcare, education, ethics (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: First Nations occupying Lelu Island, blocking early Petronas LNG work

The battle over Malaysian energy giant Petronas’ controversial LNG terminal in the Skeena River Estuary is intensifying, as local Lax Kw’alaams First Nation members are setting up camp on Lelu Island, near Prince Rupert – the site of the proposed project.

“Basically we’re going to be occupying our traditional land, exercising our rights, harvesting whatever natural resources we have” says Joey Wesley, a member of the Lax Kw’alaams band.

A barge carrying equipment related to geotechnical work for Petronas’ proposed Lelu Island LNG plant (facebook)

A recently-launched facebook page spearheading the campaign has garnered over a thousand likes in just a few (Read more…) Motherboard: How First Nations Kids Built Their Own Internet Infrastructure

First Nations kids in Ontario found a solution to no high-speed, ridiculously expensive Internet service: they built their own infrastructure. Learn more below, and demand world-class Internet service for 100% of Canadians at

Article by Jordan Pearson for Motherboard

read more

Cowichan Conversations: Thomas Mulcair To Hecklers-Show A Little Respect To First Nations!

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: B.C. must heed Mount Polley disaster’s lessons

“We need stronger environmental assessments,” says award-winning Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki, reflecting on last year’s Mount Polley disaster in British Columbia.

The post David Suzuki: B.C. must heed Mount Polley disaster’s lessons appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Roderick Benns interviews Chantelle Scott about the role a basic income could play in fostering business development: Scott says she would have preferred to have been able to take some business courses and learn more before jumping into opening a store – but she couldn’t afford to wait.

“There is pressure when you are on EI or Alberta Works, and there is fear. The programs inhibit job growth because you always know you will lose most of the support if you find a job, and if it is a bad job you are (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: 11 Weeks of Daily Harper Protests

The Harper Re-election Disaster Bus Totalitarianism: daily, for 11 weeks!

Get used to this.

People hate Harper and his Conservatives. We will see through his weak attempt to wedge oppositions parties by running a long election campaign because he has more money to spend.

Saturation will come fast.

We will remember how much contempt he holds for people and democracy.

We will listen to his 5 non-answers to 5 media questions each day and we will be constantly reminded of how much we can’t stand what he has done to Canada.

And we will see this. Every day:

Harper campaign (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Cowboys and Indians keep gaining powerful allies in Site C Dam battle

Battle lines are being drawn and sides taken in what is shaping up to be an epic fight over the the $9 Billion proposed Site C Dam.

On one side is the “Cowboy and Indian” alliance, which continues gathering strength against the project, said chiefs and landowners at a recent press conference in Vancouver. The Peace Valley leaders were in town for a federal court hearing on their legal challenge of the highly controversial Site C.

Heavy hitters line up against Site C

While the alliance has suffered some recent setbacks, it continues picking up big backers. Early in July, the Metro Vancouver board overwhelmingly voted to call (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Murray Dobbin writes that Canadians should indeed see the federal election as a choice between security and risk – with the Cons’ failing economic policies representing a risk we can’t afford to keep taking: (N)ot only is Harper vulnerable on his own limited anti-terror grounds, he is extremely vulnerable when it comes to the kind of security that actually affects millions of Canadians. When it comes to economic and social security, the vast majority of Canadians haven’t been this insecure since the Great Depression.

It’s not as if we don’t know the numbers (Read more…)

A Puff of Absurdity: On the Courage to Care

It’s snowing in Australia and Alaska is on fire, but what really worries me is some police overstepping the bounds of their authority. Just on my facebook feed today, they’ve punched a kid with autism, barged in on a naked woman illegally, and provoked or directly caused suicides in jail, and that’s on top of all the shootings, chokings, and other unnecessary uses of violence against citizens we’ve been hearing about over and over.

First of all, Hedges talks about the pivotally necessary moment in revolutions when the guards of the upper class refuse to protect (Read more…)

The Tory Pirate - Politics & Policy: The Case for a Province of First Nations

UPDATE: It appears I am not the first to consider this idea. A paper was published by Queens University which goes intomuch more detail than I ever could. Link

The problems facing Canada’s First Nations are many and longstanding. Some of these problems are structural. Bandleadership often has to deal with all the considerations of a province while dealing with federal red tape which renderseven capable ministers overwhelmed (and politics has shown us that our leaders can’t always be capable administrators).Having to seek permission from Ottawa for major projects further prevents effective leadership. Further, First Nations (Read more…)

A Puff of Absurdity: So I Went to the March

I went to the Jobs, Justice, Climate march on Sunday.  It’s taken me a few days to think about what I think about it.

Klein so close at the pre-pre-rally.

I got to Queen’s Park way early and sat under a big tree to read and wait, and I happened to sit where the media were setting up, so right next to Naomi Klein and Bill McKibben.  I missed seeing David Suzuki, and I somehow didn’t recognize Jane Fonda.  But the usual crowd was there.  In the pre-rally show, they faced the media with their backs to us, which felt (Read more…)

Terahertz: Humanists must engage with the Truth and Reconciliation Report

Earlier today I finally had some time to sit down and read parts of the Truth and Reconciliation report and set out why Humanist Canada’s response was woefully inadequate (at best). I Tweeted my responses and then built my first Storify. Hopefully this works.

[View the story “Humanist Canada’s “response” to the Truth and Reconciliation Report” on Storify]

Dead Wild Roses: Canada Day – Something To Be Proud Of.

“Patriotism assumes that our globe is divided into little spots, each one surrounded by an iron gate. Those who have had the fortune of being born on some particular spot, consider themselves better, nobler, grander, more intelligent than the living beings inhabiting any other spot. It is, therefore, the duty of everyone living on that chosen spot to fight, kill, and die in the attempt to impose his superiority upon all the others.”

-EMMA GOLDMAN, Anarchism and Other Essays

Celebrating Canada’s ‘nationhood’ seems a little trite and ephemeral to me. Woo, ethnic cleansing, woo cultural genocide and the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Emmanuel Saez examines the U.S.’ latest income inequality numbers and finds that the gap between the wealthy few and everybody else is still growing. The Equality Trust finds that the UK’s tax system is already conspicuously regressive even as the Cameron Cons plan to make it more so. And Tom Clark reviews Anthony Atkinson’s Inequality, featuring the observation that even returning to the distribution of the 1970s will require major (if needed) changes to the economic assumptions we’ve meekly accepted since then.

- Andrew Mitrovica comments on the Cons’ pandering (Read more…)