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Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Armine Yalnizyan counters the Cons’ spin on tax-free savings accounts. And Rob Carrick points out that raising the limit on TFSAs would forfeit billions of desperately-needed dollars to benefit only the wealthiest few in Canada: TFSAs are Swiss army knives – a financial knife, corkscrew, screwdriver and more. But doubling the annual contribution limit of $5,500 is a bad idea.

Message to the federal government: Please don’t, because we can’t afford it.…A report from the Parliamentary Budget Officer this week says the federal government would lose $14.7-billion a year in (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, condensing this post on the risks of allowing CSIS to self-assess the scope of Canadians’ Charter rights under C-51.

For further reading…- Again, the go-to source for analysis of C-51 is Craig Forcese and Kent Roach’s site here. – Clayton Ruby and Nader Hasan’s analysis is here.- John Mueller and Mark Stewart duly reject the attempt to invent some existential terrorist threat. – Dale Smith muses about the Cons’ rush to ram C-51 through without analysis here. PressProgress challenges the conventional wisdom as to the supposed popularity of the bill here. And the Star appeals for (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Regina demands missing, murdered aboriginal women inquiry

Regina city council has added its voice to the growing call for a national inquiry into the crisis of 1,200 murdered and missing aboriginal women in Canada.

The post Regina demands missing, murdered aboriginal women inquiry appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: Group Letter Urged Obama To Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Hundreds of First Nation leaders, environmentalists, land owners, musicians, authors, actors and artists signed letter urging Obama to veto Keystone XL pipeline.

The post Group Letter Urged Obama To Veto Keystone XL Pipeline Bill appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Danyaal Raza highlights how Canadians can treat an election year as an opportunity to discuss the a focus on social health with candidates and peers alike: Health providers are increasingly recognizing that while a robust health care system is an important part of promoting Canadians’ health, so is the availability of affordable housing, decent work, and a tightly knit social safety net. Upstream-focused clinical interventions, like the income security program available where I practice, are increasingly meeting that need – but no such program works in a vacuum.…Thinking differently requires speaking differently. (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: Looking for Heroes?

I’ve been watching The Book of Negroes this week. I have no words. I only recognize justice, integrity, brutality, acknowledgement, witnessing, story telling and a myriad of other foggy responses.

It’s easy to also ponder qualities of heroes.

Then I read this from earlier this week, and nodded. Do you get it?

Anishinabe Women Protest Energy East Pipeline on Family Day

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 16, 2015

‘Protect the Water, For Future Generations’: Message being shared today with local families, starting at Market Square at noon.

Kenora—Dozens of Anishinabe Women, their families, and supporters converge today on Market Square at (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Jacques Peretti discusses how corporate elites rewrote our social contract in a concerted effort to the inequality we’re fighting today – and suggests it’s well past time to push back in the name of moral economics: Politicians have now, as then, conspired in their own diminishment — outsourcing foreign policy to Washington, saying there’s nothing we can do about global capitalism.

But it’s not up to them, it’s up to us to be uncompromisingly moral at a moment when the criminal immorality of 30 years of misguided economic policy has been revealed.

The (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Doug Saunders observes that Syriza’s strong election victory may signal a sea change as to whether austerity is inevitable, while Adnan Al-Daini notes that the financial sector can no longer take for granted that its profits will be placed above the interests of actual people. Which means that Joe Oliver may get even more lonely lecturing Canada’s provinces that the economic beatings will continue until morale improves.

- Speaking of whom, Canadians for Tax Fairness highlights how Oliver has long known that the Cons’ income splitting plans represent nothing more than a (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: You Deserve Better Wages and Benefits

Right wingers want to pay no tax. It’s hard to bleat about that in public without sounding like the greedy, selfish people they are.

Instead, they say that public sector workers are paid too much, and that we should privatize everything. THAT way, governments get to starve themselves to the point where they collect virtually no taxes.

Instead of letting rapacious corporations dictate what market wages should be, we should explore living wages, then dream up a world not so different from ours when private sector workers make the stable wages and benefits of public sector workers.

Dream with me, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Will Hutton writes about the connection between inequality and the loss of any moral or social purpose in public life: Britain is beset by a crisis of purpose. We don’t know who we are any longer, where we are going or even if there is a “we”. The country is so passionately attached to past glories because there are so few to celebrate in the present. The crisis is compounded since we have been told for 30 years that the route to universal wellbeing is to abandon the expense of justice (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Larry Elliott writes that at least some business leaders are paying lip service to the idea that inequality needs to be reined in. But Alec Hogg points out that at least some of the privileged few are using their obscene wealth to remove themselves from the rest of humanity, rather than lifting a finger to help anybody else.

- Meanwhile, Joseph Stiglitz observes that sheer stubborn stupidity on the part of austerians is doing untold damage to the global economy. But Jon Henley notes that in advance of Syriza’s election victory, a new (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Crawford Kilian writes that growing inequality has been largely the product of deliberate engineering rather than any natural process, while Paul Krugman focuses on the preferential treatment of capital income in particular. And Simon Barrow discusses the sources and beneficiaries of the increasing wealth gap: (T)he anti-change interests arrayed against any attempt to substantially reform global finance, block the privileging of huge corporate interests (TTIP being a prime example), ensure labour rights, address income and wealth gaps, stop tax evasion and tax dodging by the wealthiest on an industrial scale, legally enshrine transparency (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: RCMP Pursuing A Relationship

Cop constructively abducts Native woman in Canada <~ media calls it "Pursuing a Relationship" FU pic.twitter.com/tdHy8daYKg

— lastrealindians.com (@lastrealindians) January 9, 2015

RCMP officers don’t possess good sense given to every other human being, apparently.

Politics, Re-Spun: Shhh, The Bold Revolution Has Started

We live in tumultuous times:

Ferguson and other non-indictments of white police who murdered people of colour ISIL and other extremism Stephen Harper’s continued assault on democracy and embrace of soft fascism [has he had CRA audit YOUR favourite progressive group yet?] Accusations against Jian Ghomeshi Accusations against Bill Cosby The epidemic of campus rape, and necessary reflection about why it has taken this long to take this seriously Victoria’s Times-Colonist newspaper’s racist editorial cartoons, and necessary reflection about why it has taken this long to take this seriously Pipelines, fracking, dirty energy, tankers The destructive Site-C dam (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: No to pipelines, yes to Site C?

Peace River Valley

No to pipelines, yes to Site C?

Here’s a piece I wrote for Ricochet after getting riled up by *some* of the arguments against Site C. The full piece is here.

To shift off fossil fuels we’ll need more large scale, public energy infrastructure

As the movement against pipelines rapidly grows, more and more often you can hear the question, “We know what you’re against. What are you for?” The debate over the future of power generation in British Columbia offers some lessons for how to answer this question and not fall victim to a privatized (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: The Movement For Environmental Rights Is Building

In Canada, the idea of citizens’ right to live in a healthy environment is getting traction at both the grassroots and highest political levels, says environmentalist David Suzuki.

The post David Suzuki: The Movement For Environmental Rights Is Building appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: “People are going to die”

First Nations Financial Transparency Act: Watch Pam Palmater put the Canadian Taxpayers Federation in its place. “We don’t even have enough money to have websites, how the heck are we supposed to post it online?”

“What’s non-essential on a First Nation?” Palmater asks Evan who is quoting the Conservative government. “We have suicides every day, contaminated water, we have a major housing crisis, food and security in the North that Minister A. (#LyingLeona) could[n’t] care less about. What’s non-essential in a First Nation? People are going to die, if there is not enough funding for (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Yukon First Nations score big court win in Peel Watershed case

The Peel Watershed’s Wind River (Jill Pangman)

Two Yukon First Nations have won yet another landmark indigenous legal victory – this time against the local territorial government, over the vast Peel Watershed.

Thomas Berger explains Peel case to media in January 2014

The case was brought by famed Canadian legal figure Thomas Berger on behalf of Na-Cho Nyak Dun and Tr’ondëk Hwëchin nations – both of whom share traditional territory in the largely pristine northern Yukon watershed. The plaintiffs also included several conservation groups and individuals.

The battle stems from a land use planning process for the Peel that spanned (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: First Nations: NEB review of Kinder Morgan pipeline “fatally flawed”

In an open letter, 12 BC First Nations tell the Harper government the National Energy Board’s review of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain Expansion Project is “fatally flawed and superficial.”

The post First Nations: NEB review of Kinder Morgan pipeline “fatally flawed” appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Clean drinking water should be a human right in Canada

The lack of access to clean drinking water for hundreds of First Nations, Metis and Inuit communities across Canada, is a national shame, says environmentalist David Suzuki.

The post David Suzuki: Clean drinking water should be a human right in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Mark Gongloff takes a look at social mobility research from multiple countries, and finds that there’s every reason for concern that inheritance is far outweighing individual attributes in determining social status. And Left Futures notes that the problem may only get worse as our corporate overlords become more and more sophisticated at cannibalizing our commonwealth for profit.

- Speaking of which, Jake MacDonald offers an insightful (if maddening) review of how farmers are suffering from the demolition of the single-desk Canadian Wheat Board.

- Andrew Jackson comments on the Cons’ glaring failure (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: #LyingLeona Lets Them Eat Cake From The Dump

Conservative Minister Leona A. is a disgrace. That means she’s a fine representative of the Conservative Party of Canada.

You may remember other Lying Leona blunders from such stories as Canada phasing out coal, and the Canadian government isn’t muzzling scientists.

The Common Sense Canadian: Nisga’a Nation community members protest LNG deal

Petronas’ proposed Pacific Northwest LNG project – the source of partnership talks with the Nisga’a Nation

Read this Nov. 10 Tyee story by Wawmeesh G. Hamilton on the grassroots cracks forming in a proposed deal between a Nisga’a Nation elected leaders, TransCanada Pipelines and Pacific Northwest LNG – the $11 Billion project planned for Prince Rupert, backed by Malaysia’s Petronas. Nisga’a members are concerned about environmental and cultural impacts from a proposed pipeline that would cut through the Nass Valley territory’s iconic lava beds and potentially affect burial sites, among other issues.

At a downtown Vancouver hotel on Thursday, three men in business suits were (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Conservatives Learning Lessons of History

11. Government handing over the most vulnerable to religious groups has worked out well in Canadian history: look at the residential schools

— Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet) November 10, 2014

1. Canada is now a country that will offer sex workers the "option" of being sent to religious reeducation camps: https://t.co/sxaDIW1bC5

— Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet) November 10, 2014

I’ll give old clothes to Salvation Army, and shop in their thrift shops, but I wouldn’t attend a re-education camp of theirs.

@HeerJeet Also, how will people of First Nations descent caught up in this react to being offered 'ride out of (Read more…)

Northern Insight / Perceptivity: Plus ça change…

Suzanne Methot reviewed Farley Mowat’s Walking on the Land, which was published in 2000. From that review:

“Farley Mowat detailed government treatment of the Ihalmiut, First Nations people in Canada’s northern lands. His accounts, which described famine and epidemics of disease, were vigorously denied by churches, industry, and government and earned Mowat the nickname “Hardly Knowit.” The denials continued for decades, culminating in the 1990s with Saturday Night’s infamous cover graphic of Mowat with a Pinocchio nose.

“Walking on the Land is another account of the Ihalmiut saga, and Mowat’s response to the denials. The author has rehashed (Read more…)