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The Common Sense Canadian: Nisga’a Nation community members protest LNG deal

Petronas’ proposed Pacific Northwest LNG project – the source of partnership talks with the Nisga’a Nation

Read this Nov. 10 Tyee story by Wawmeesh G. Hamilton on the grassroots cracks forming in a proposed deal between a Nisga’a Nation elected leaders, TransCanada Pipelines and Pacific Northwest LNG – the $11 Billion project planned for Prince Rupert, backed by Malaysia’s Petronas. Nisga’a members are concerned about environmental and cultural impacts from a proposed pipeline that would cut through the Nass Valley territory’s iconic lava beds and potentially affect burial sites, among other issues.

At a downtown Vancouver hotel on Thursday, three men in business suits were (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Conservatives Learning Lessons of History

11. Government handing over the most vulnerable to religious groups has worked out well in Canadian history: look at the residential schools

— Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet) November 10, 2014

1. Canada is now a country that will offer sex workers the "option" of being sent to religious reeducation camps: https://t.co/sxaDIW1bC5

— Jeet Heer (@HeerJeet) November 10, 2014

I’ll give old clothes to Salvation Army, and shop in their thrift shops, but I wouldn’t attend a re-education camp of theirs.

@HeerJeet Also, how will people of First Nations descent caught up in this react to being offered 'ride out of (Read more…)

Northern Insight / Perceptivity: Plus ça change…

Suzanne Methot reviewed Farley Mowat’s Walking on the Land, which was published in 2000. From that review:

“Farley Mowat detailed government treatment of the Ihalmiut, First Nations people in Canada’s northern lands. His accounts, which described famine and epidemics of disease, were vigorously denied by churches, industry, and government and earned Mowat the nickname “Hardly Knowit.” The denials continued for decades, culminating in the 1990s with Saturday Night’s infamous cover graphic of Mowat with a Pinocchio nose.

“Walking on the Land is another account of the Ihalmiut saga, and Mowat’s response to the denials. The author has rehashed (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Clearing The Forest

The Queen’s act against this homeless woman is unkind, and Canada’s laws shouldn’t be unkind for the sake of protecting unused land from First Nations people building a temporary home. Further, we don’t need to urbanize more people, and this law is clearly aimed at clearing Canada’s wilderness of humans, and putting them into overcrowded cities without the means to buy food, shelter, and drink.

Canada should stop at Clearing the Plains, and not push the same outdated, genocidal agenda into this century.

The Canadian Progressive: New student coalition vows to block tar sands pipelines at Quebec border

A new student coalition promises to block Transcanada’s Energy East and Enbridge’s line 9B tar sands pipeline projects “at Quebec border.”

The post New student coalition vows to block tar sands pipelines at Quebec border appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Politics, Re-Spun: Are Your White Male Entitlements Maiming Your Vote this Month?

I’m not going to argue that using an Intersectionality lens in the municipal election in 2 weeks will make your voting choices perfectly easy.

But I will say that your white male entitlements have likely contributed to worse choices in the past. Including not voting.

When you read this entire article you will see the lie of neutrality and non-partisanship.

Don’t perpetuate your perhaps inadvertent oppression.

As we approach the municipal election on November 15th, potential voters may feel unsure about which party or candidate represents the best interests of their community. One way to begin sifting through the different (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Bob Rae in Regina about Honouring The Treaties

Hundreds listening to @BobRae48 at #uofr #bigcrowd #HonourTheTreaties #IdleNoMore pic.twitter.com/QAzkPW01Lz

— Saskboy K. (@saskboy) October 31, 2014

The Calder case about the Niska people. Argued no treaty so they had Aboriginal title to the BC land. Crown: settlement extinguished title.

Millions lived in North America hundreds of years ago, but settlers viewed it as empty. By 1867, only 150000 indigenous people remained alive in Canada.

Our country must face and address tough issues at all levels of government. Largest Aboriginal population is in Toronto says Bob Rae. Dynamic in the country is changing. Assimilation and powerlessness have failed.

(Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: Dispossession by Negotiation – Harper’s Approach to Native Land Rights

In what appears to be “Shame on You, Canada” Day, the Guardian has a damning piece on how the Harper regime is intent on severing Canada’s First Nations from their rightful claims to ancestral lands.

First Nations have been emboldened by this summer’s Supreme Court of Canada William decision, which recognized the aboriginal title of the Tsilhqot’in nation to 1750 square kilometres of their land in central British Columbia – not outright ownership, but the right to use and manage the land and to reap its economic benefits.The ruling affects all “unceded” territory in Canada – those lands (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Michal Rozworski responds to idealized views of Canadian equality with the reality that we fall well short of the Scandinavian model: Canada appears on many accounts much closer to the US than Sweden, the stand-in for a more robust social democratic and redistributive state. Indeed, looking at the three top rows of the table, there is a clear link between the higher share of income going to the top (inequality) and the higher share of taxes paid for by those at the top (redistribution a la Vox authors Martin and Hertel-Fernandez). On both (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: What I Am Thankful For

This weekend, I am thankful for folks in Seattle who know how to transform the imperialist Columbus Day into Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

May we all learn this for next year!

“We are all citizens in a democracy, we are all here to work with each other, and by making this Indigenous People’s Day, we are adding something, we are not taking something away. We can both recognize our strengths.”

“We are not reveling in the pain of our past, but rejoicing in the celebration of a triumph—the voice of the indigenous people who are saying ‘we are still (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Red Chris Mine: First Nations win round 1 with Imperial Metals in court

Tahltan and Secwepemc First Nations and supporters celebrate at the BC Supreme Court (contributed)

BC First Nations added a small but potentially significant notch to their legal winning streak yesterday, with a temporary victory over Imperial Metals in BC Supreme Court.

The company was seeking an interlocutory injunction and enforcement order enabling it to have Tahltan Nation protesters immediate, forcibly removed from a blockade of Red Chris Mine, Imperial’s lastest venture, in northwest BC’s Sacred Headwaters.

Red Chris Mine under construction (Unuk River Post)

After hearing from the company’s lawyers and three First Nations women fromt he Tahltan and Secwepemc Nations, Justice Grauer refused (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Imperial Metals asks court to remove Red Chris Mine blockade

First Nations have been protesting several Imperial Metals mines since Mount Polley (Photo: Facebook)

Imperial Metals, the company behind the Mount Polley tailing pond disaster, is seeking an injunction today at the BC Supreme Court to forcibly remove Tahltan First Nations protestors from a blockade of the company’s newest project, Red Chris Mine.

In a media advisory this morning, the leaders of the Yuct Ne Senxiymetkwe Camp – established near Mount Polley mine by a group of local Secwepemc First Nations following the largest tailings pond spill in history – announced a protest of the injunction proceedings outside the Vancouver court house where they (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Charlie Smith discusses – and then follows up on – Donald Gutstein’s work in tracing the connections between the Harper Cons and the shadowy, U.S.-based network of right-wing propaganda mills: In Harperism: How Stephen Har­per and His Think Tank Colleagues Have Transformed Canada (James Lorimer & Company Ltd.), Gutstein makes the case that neoliberalism is far more sinister than simply having a desire for smaller government. A central tenet of his new book is that Harper is undermining democracy by marshalling the power of government to create and enforce (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Don Pittis makes the case for a guaranteed annual income on economic and social grounds: The young would be some of the biggest beneficiaries. Students could use the money to pay for their education, thus eliminating student loan programs. Students from poor families could afford to take courses to improve their skills.

The old age security system could disappear. So would the baby bonus itself. The demogrant would supplement government programs such as minimum wage, EI, CPP/QPP, disability allowance – all resulting in bureaucratic savings.

But going back to my original question: if (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: First Nations to Ottawa: Scrap Site C Dam or LNG is a no-go

BC Chiefs Roland Wilson, Liz Logan and Stewart Phillip taking their anti-Site C message to Ottawa (Twitter)

Read this Sept. 24 Globe and Mail story by Dene Moore on the trip taken by several BC First Nations chiefs to Ottawa, calling on the federal Cabinet to reject the proposed Site C Dam.

With a decision imminent on the Site C hydroelectric project in northeastern British Columbia, area First Nations have delivered a message to the provincial government: You can have the dam or you can have liquefied natural gas, but you will not get both.

The $8-billion dam (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Robert Reich discusses how our economic system is set up to direct risk toward the people who can least afford to bear it (while also directing the spoils to those who need them least): Bankruptcy was designed so people could start over. But these days, the only ones starting over are big corporations, wealthy moguls, and Wall Street.

Corporations are even using bankruptcy to break contracts with their employees. When American Airlines went into bankruptcy three years ago, it voided its labor agreements and froze its employee pension plan.

After it emerged (Read more…)

Montreal Simon: The Human Rights Museum and the Aboriginal Genocide

I see that the Canadian Human Rights Museum has finally opened its doors in Winnipeg.Which as someone who has fought all his life for human rights, is something I would normally celebrate.Except for the ghastly almost unbelievable fact that it doesn't recognize Canada's aboriginal genocide.Because Stephen Harper and his disgusting Con regime won't acknowledge what was done to our precious native people. Read more »

The Canadian Progressive: Alberta Activists Join Tar Sands Bloc at People’s Climate March

Activist members of Alberta First Nations to tell world leaders: “We will not stop fighting until we’ve stopped tar sands at the source.”

The post Alberta Activists Join Tar Sands Bloc at People’s Climate March appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: I went to Controllin’ Steve’s Talking Point Dispensarium the other night…

…and a democratic Parliament broke out.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Linda McQuaig discusses how a politically-oriented audit of the CCPA fits with the shock-and-awe part of the right’s war against independent (and public-minded) though: In the conservative quest to shape public debate in recent years, no tool has proved more useful than the think tank. Nobody understood this better than the director of the ultra-right wing U.S.-based ATLAS Foundation, who once stated that his mission was “to litter the world with free-market think tanks.”

Mission accomplished. Certainly the Canadian landscape is cluttered with right-wing think tanks — the Fraser Institute, (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Christy Clark: Govt ready to embrace Tsilhqot’in case, Aboriginal title – Chiefs cautiously optimistic

Video of the historic meeting between the premier of BC and First Nations leaders – featuring Christy Clark, Chief Roger William and Grand Chiefs Ed John and Stewart Phillip.

Watch the premier’s dramatic about-face on the landmark Tsilhqot’in legal case, as she vows to embrace the Supreme Court ruling and commit to fundamentally changing the government’s relationship with First Nations.

The leaders of the First Nations Summit and Union of BC Indian Chiefs, along with Tsilhqot’in lead plaintiff Roger William, each sounded a note of cautious optimism at this new “opportunity”.

In addition to this Vancouver meeting, the premier and (Read more…)

The Common Sense Canadian: Rafe: Premier’s Tsilhqot’in meeting a sign of real change for BC?

Tsilhqot’in Chief Roger William and Premier Christy Clark meeting in Vancouver today (Damien Gillis

This is the story of change.

Premier Christy Clark is to be congratulated for going to the Nemiah Valley and meeting with the Tsilhqot’in First Nation leaders about their position on land claims now that they have won a landmark Supreme Court of Canada decision.

It is easy to say “about time”, except that same criticism could be applied to several premiers, going back years. I believe this is the first time a BC premier could have made such a visit and that we all had to (Read more…)

Scott's DiaTribes: Harper / PMO: “The Inuit knew about the Franklin ships? Who knew?”

APTN demonstrates how low a priority First Nations relations are with the Harper government at the moment:

The Franklin expedition ship found by researchers on the Arctic seabed has a detailed and colourful history within Inuit oral tradition, yet the Inuit garnered only one 17-word sentence among the press releases and backgrounders released by the Prime Minister’s Office at the time after Tuesday’s announced discovery…the general public wouldn’t know about the key role Inuit oral history played in the selection of the search area by reading the information posted on the PMO’s website. There, the role of the Inuit in (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: Industrious immigrant vs idle Indigenous meets reality

Here’s a familiar trope: immigrants are industrious and hard-working. Here’s another, opposite trope: First Nations are idle and lazy. And here’s a graph that beautifully calls into question this neat pair of stereotypes.

Source: Angella McEwen, Progressive Economics Forum.

It turns out that off-reserve First Nations workers and recent immigrants face the same unemployment rate – one that is much higher than that faced by workers born in Canada. As Angella MacEwen, who posted this graph, points out it highlights that “there are systemic barriers that need to be addressed” in the labour market.

On the one hand, there is (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: Political Eh-conomy Radio: BC teachers and First Nations on the frontlines

My guests today help take a fresh look at two issues where British Columbia is on the front lines of bigger social conflicts: that over the future of public education and that over resource development on First Nations lands.

https://politicalehconomy.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/podcast-140905-bc-frontlines1.mp3

My first guest is Helesia Luke, life-long public education advocate and member of the board of the BC Society for Public Education. In the midst of BC’s continuing teachers’ strike, she recently wrote a very incisive article on how the government’s $40 per day cash payment to parents are reminiscent of vouchers and fit with broader efforts (Read more…)