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A Puff of Absurdity: Standing Rock Resistance

Chris Hedges is in Standing Rock, back to his original career as a war correspondent. The natives there are preparing for winter, and I’m struck by the contrast to the Occupy fight that dwindled away when things got cold. I’m curled up on the couch as I write that, so I mean no disrespect. . . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Standing Rock Resistance

A Puff of Absurdity: Water as a Human Right

In a recent article in my local paper, Peter Shawn Taylor says that anyone who wants to stop Nestle from draining aquifers doesn’t understand economics and is hostile to capitalism. He implies that we can’t just label water a human right above the fray of the market without doing the same with food, clothes, . . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Water as a Human Right

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Karen Foster and Tamara Krawchenko discuss how policy can – and should – be designed to improve intergenerational equity: Canada trails far behind other industrialized nations in its attention to intergenerational equity. The country could do far more to report on a carefully defined intergenerational equity, track . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Andrew Jackson writes that the Libs’ fall economic statement represents a massive (and unjustified) shift away from promised infrastructure funding even while planning to privatize both existing operations and future developments. And Joie Warnock highlights why it would represent nothing short of scandalous mismanagement for the Wall . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– George Monbiot rightly makes the point that a general attitude of kindness is a must for a functioning society – while lamenting that anything of the sort is all too often lacking from public policy choices.

– James Di Fiore discusses Justin Trudeau’s failed attempt at a triangulation . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Branko Milanovic highlights the futility of pretending that market mechanisms will produce anything other than profit-oriented outcomes – and the observation represents an obvious reason not to put public services in corporate hands. And David Sloan Wilson (in introducing an interview with Sigrun Aasland) points out how Norway’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: How a controversial dam threatens rights of Canada’s indigenous Innu people

The controversial Muskrat Falls hydroelectric project in Labrador, Canada, “relies on local Innu people giving up their own lands.” It “joins a long history of dispossession in North America.”

The post How a controversial dam threatens rights of Canada’s indigenous Innu people appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Jordan Brennan points out why Nova Scotia (and other jurisdictions) should move past austerity economics: The McNeil Liberals appear set to rack up budgetary surpluses through a strategy of public sector wage suppression. This is likely to backfire. It is an elementary insight of economic analysis that, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Thomas Walkom writes that the federal Libs’ idea of “real change” for the economy reflects nothing more than the same old stale neoliberal playbook: At its core, the federal government’s “bold” new plan for economic growth is strikingly familiar.

The scheme, worked out by Finance Minister Bill . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Politics, Re-Spun: Goodbye, Politics, Re-Spun! Hello, WePivot.net!

“Politics, Re-Spun” is now WePivot.net!

but why, you scream in horror!

next month is the 14th anniversary of Politics, Re-Spun…it’s time for a reframing/rebranding/pivot to something more…betterer, or more bigly, if you will.

14 years ago, in the twisted Orwellian months after 9/11 where words did not mean what words are, it was important to . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: Goodbye, Politics, Re-Spun! Hello, WePivot.net!

Politics, Re-Spun: Fixing the Cleveland I*****s Racist Team Name

Congratulations, Toronto Blue Jays on another exciting season!

Let’s hope that before the Atlanta B****s or Cleveland I*****s come back to Toronto they will have changed their name. And as I’ve argued in the past, the process of fixing racist team names can itself be a reconciliation moment.

A moment that you can help bring . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: Fixing the Cleveland I*****s Racist Team Name

Politics, Re-Spun: What the BC Premier’s Reconciliation Smells Like

Quite simply, if a politician dangles child welfare money to anyone, but makes it contingent on embracing a sick LNG plant, what does that smell like to you?

I think it smells the same as when she tells a school board to close schools or else they don’t get seismic upgrading money.

I think . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: What the BC Premier’s Reconciliation Smells Like

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada

David Suzuki on the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada, and the “hard work and leadership of Indigenous women and communities who have spent decades calling for an inquiry.”

The post David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

. . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Confronting the crisis of violence against Indigenous women and girls in Canada

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Baratunde Thurston makes the point that even beyond income and wealth inequality, there’s an obviously unfair distribution of second chances in the U.S. depending on one’s race and class. Denis Campbell reports on the link between poverty and childhood obesity, while Jen St. Denis highlights how poverty . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Politics, Re-Spun: Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

I so hope you had a wonderful Indigenous Peoples’ Day yesterday!

In “America” there is a movement to replace the systemically racist Columbus Day. It’s spreading briskly; soon it may reach the 100th Monkey and spread across Turtle Island.

In Canada, we had Thanksgiving Day, for all the cornucopia reasons you can think of.

But . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: Happy Indigenous Peoples’ Day!

Joe Fantauzzi: Columbus is no hero of mine

Italian-North Americans — especially those of us with roots in the Mezzogiorno (and I include the Ciociaria and Abbruzzo here) — don’t need a Genoese genocidal rapist as our hero. It’s time to eliminate Columbus Day. It’s time for #IndigenousPeoplesDay   Some good reading and watching: ‘All Indians Are Dead?’ At Least That’s What Most . . . → Read More: Joe Fantauzzi: Columbus is no hero of mine

Politics, Re-Spun: Columbus Day is Institutionalized Racism

In Canada, we celebrate Thanksgiving Day today, a slight improvement on Columbus day, which institutionalizes systemic racism.

Columbus Day celebrates white supremacy. It’s time to stop that now. If you need some elaboration, read this.

Seattle did it 2 years ago. Now Vermont has figured out a first step in a solution: turning Columbus Day . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: Columbus Day is Institutionalized Racism

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Cindy Blackstock offers a reminder of Canada’s long and shameful history of discrimination against First Nations children. And Donna Ferreiro takes a look at some of the faces of the Sixties Scoop which saw Indigenous children separated from their families due solely to racial and cultural . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Alex Himelfarb and Trish Hennessy offer their take as to what we should expect out of Ontario’s basic income experiment: Critics rightly argue that basic income is no magic bullet, that indeed there are no magic bullets. The history of the idea of basic income shows it’s no . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Politics, Re-Spun: Trudeau Spins the Royals

If you’re wondering about what kind of spin cycle Trudeau [#TheNewHarper] put the Royals through to smooth over First Nations discontent with the 21st century version of settler imperialism?

Read this:

Justin Trudeau’s relationship with indigenous people and the politics of William and Kate’s Canadian Royal tour

A cynic might question if the prime minister . . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: Trudeau Spins the Royals

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– David Boyle discusses how the principle of free trade – once intended to empower consumers against monopolies – is instead being used to lock in corporate control: (T)he original idea of free trade was not a simple licence to do whatever you wanted, if you were rich . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Mary O’Hara notes that even a relatively modest and incomplete set of progressive policies has created some important movement toward reducing poverty. And conversely, Caroline Mortimer writes that child poverty is exploding under the Conservative majority government in the UK.

– Dean Beeby reports on the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Canadian Progressive: Over 1280 archaeologists and historians denounce Dakota Access Pipeline

At least 1281 archaeologists, anthropologists, historians, students and museum directors from the US, Canada and other countries recently signed a letter condemning the destruction of Standing Rock Sioux burial grounds and sacred sites by the Dakota Access Pipeline company.

The post Over 1280 archaeologists and historians denounce Dakota Access Pipeline appeared first on The . . . → Read More: The Canadian Progressive: Over 1280 archaeologists and historians denounce Dakota Access Pipeline

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how a recent spate of announcements signals that contrary to their campaign commitments in both theme and detail, there’s been little difference between the Trudeau Liberals and the Harper Conservatives in substance.

For further reading…– The point is one being made by plenty of other observers as well in various contexts, including Ross . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day