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reeves report: Melting Glaciers to Release Billions of Kilograms of CO₂ by 2050

A new study finds sea-level rise isn’t the only thing to fear about melting glaciers.

Antarctic Ice Shelf Loss Comes From Underneath by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center \ CC BY 2.0 via Flickr

WE KNOW SEA levels are rising as climate change causes glaciers to melt. But it turns out rising seas may not be the only catastrophic by-product of glacier melt we need to worry about.

A new study from researchers at Florida State University published this week in the journal Nature Geoscience has discovered there will be a substantial carbon impact resulting from the loss of (Read more…)

The Progressive Right: Town Hall Event – "Ontario’s Greenbelt Under Threat" ( #onpoli )

In partnership with Ontario Greenbelt Alliance, Land Over Landings presents a Town Hall Meeting to expose the threats to Ontario’s Greenbelt.

January 28th – 7 – 9 pm, Brougham Town Hall, Brougham, Ontario.

Full details are available via the Facebook event.

Accidental Deliberations: I see what you did there

Let’s face it: a broken Red Book promise, an ignored Kyoto Protocol commitment and zero policy action later, nobody would have had reason to believe any Lib policy promises on greenhouse gas emissions anyway. So why wouldn’t Justin Trudeau try to spin continued neglect at the federal level as a feature rather than a bug?

Of course, anybody who actually wants to rein in climate change might recognize that an opt-in approach to a collective action problem is set up to fail. But apparently, “anybody who actually wants to rein in climate change” isn’t in the Libs’ pool of target (Read more…)

Northern Insight / Perceptivity: Motorcycle Guy roars, we should listen

This was a comment on the preceding article from a regular reader. He’s a man I’ve come to admire for his dedication as he tries to reveal that government cut deals to enrich a few people at the expense of many. Additionally, those dishonest politicians forced environmental regulators to abdicate statutory responsibilities.

Work was done on coastal lakes and waterways that destroyed nature’s irreplaceable assets, not because the public had need but because influential people bought the opportunity to make quick bucks. It is so typical of the way BC Liberals do business today, while corporate media pays no attention.

(Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Fossils To Museums

I was an 8 year old awash in fossils, so I was a tad more generous than this former 9 year old PEI lad with his much more valuable fossil. I donated a lower mandible piece from a ~12,000,000 year old Saskatchewan rhino to the Sask. Natural History (now Royal Sask.) Museum in the 1980s. I too used plastic bristle brushes (AKA tooth brushes) to dust off fossils I collected from the surface of a gravel pit near Wood Mountain, SK. Many more fossils and fossil fragments from that pit have since ended up in cement in the area.

(Read more…)

A Puff of Absurdity: This Changes Nothing

The US Senate voted that climate change is real, and many of my Facebook friends are celebrating.  But I don’t think they actually read beyond the headlines on this one.  ”Finally!”  ”This is great!” and “Today’s a great day!”  are inappropriate responses to this vote.

The vote was specifically on whether or not climate change is real WITHOUT any cause attributed to it.  So is the climate changing?  Yes – decided by a 98 to 1 margin.  But is climate change affected by human behaviour (the question the we need the Senate to affirm)?   Well, not (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Canadian Environmental Group Uses Satire To Highlight Energy East Pipeline Risks

Environmental Defence’s “Great Canadian Migrations” satirical video says grave risks posed by TransCanada’s proposed Energy East tar sands pipeline include climate change and oil spills

The post Canadian Environmental Group Uses Satire To Highlight Energy East Pipeline Risks appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Digging out of Canada’s mining dilemma

World-renowned environmentalist David Suzuki wonders whether Canadian mining and fossil fuel profiteers and their government promoters believe in the future.

The post David Suzuki: Digging out of Canada’s mining dilemma appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Canadian Dimension: This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate

Photo by Jürgen

The Lima Conference should have been a milestone that marked out how governments will take urgent action to tackle climate change and to support vulnerable people across the world to adapt to its locked in impacts. But it was a failure and ran up against a political-economic system that puts the pursuit of profit above the needs of people and the limits of nature.

This is the importance of Naomi Klein’s new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate, where she argues that the main culprit of runaway climate change is the system itself: capitalism. (Read more…)

reeves report: Invasive Ash Borer makes leap to new tree

Wright State University biologist shows the invasive Emerald Ash borer, which has killed tens of millions of ash trees across North America in the past decade, has found a new host.

Evidence of the damage caused to White Fringetree from Emerald Ash Borer. Image from Cipollini’s report.

After decimating tens of millions of ash trees in Canada and the United States, the invasive Emerald Ash Borer has developed a taste for a new, regionally threatened tree species known as the White Fringetree.

Research published in the Journal of Economic Entomology this week by Wright State University biologist Don Cipollini showed Agrilus Planipennis (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Passive House in Alaska Heated By Sun

More Canadian homes need to be built like this to survive coming fossil fuel shortages. It certainly saves a lot of money for the homeowner.

Passive House in Alaska using water insulated in a tank as a giant battery for energy.

The world would have forgotten the Saskatchewan house, too, were it not for a quirky German physicist interested in energy-saving buildings. After studying the Saskatchewan house and a handful of similar buildings, Dr. Wolfgang Feist wrote a mathematically precise — and elegantly simple — criterion for designing buildings that require less than a tenth of the energy of (Read more…)

Things Are Good: Paris to Spend €100m on Bike Lanes While Reducing Car Traffic

Paris has had a tough time with traffic and pollution in the city due to the number of cars. They have launched many environmentally friendly intitaves to curb the use of cars while making alternative transit solutions to cars more appealing. It’s working and is already inspiring other cities to follow suit. Still, traffic in France’s capital is still quite bad so the mayor as launched a new program investing €100m on new bike lanes!

“I want diesel cars out of Paris by 2020 and, if possible, beyond the peripherique,” said the mayor, referring to the city’s constantly choked ring (Read more…)

A Puff of Absurdity: The Post In Which I Get Cranky on Climate Change

When people talk about the effects of climate change, they often worry about water burying some prized beach-front real estate, but an article in Thursday’s Guardian, “Seven ways climate change could kill you,” reminds us that by about 15 years from now, we’ll be losing a quarter of a million people each year just to health implications from rising GHGs (asthma, disease, heat exhaustion…).  And very few groups, the film Interstellar being a rare exception, talk about the changing gases in our atmosphere.  The ocean trumps the rainforest as our real lungs, and as it acidifies, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Oliver Milman reports on research showing how humanity is destroying its own environmental life support systems. And our appetite for exploitation is proving a failure even from the standpoint of the pursuit of shortsighted greed, as David Dayen considers how the recent drop in oil prices – and consequent market forces limiting further production – may affect a financial sector relying on constant expansion.

- Michael Harris offers another look at the real Stephen Harper to counter the barrage of selective imaging we’ll see throughout the year. And Bob Hepburn discusses the need (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: A Gram of Prevention is Worth a Kiloliter of Benzine

If you don’t know how to fix things, stop breaking them.

Stewart, however, said it could take months for the steam to cool and the pressure to drop. He said that means any leaks from the well could continue for months.

He also expressed doubts that a cleanup is possible

“I don’t know how you get benzine out of an aquifer. There’s no process for filtering it out. It’s basically a mix of carcinogenic chemicals into this underground water system. It’s not like you can put in a scrubber and clean it all up,” Stewart said.

“The only solution (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: Science World Ignores Climate Science

Well, why would you support something called Science World when it participates in a program to brainwash students into supporting the liquid natural gas industry, despite the science indicating how harmful it is to the world.

Climate change deniers deny science.

The BC government pretends to care about climate change but is roaring ahead with oil, gas, coal, pipelines and tankers. Pure hypocrisy. They think we’re stupid.

Science World, by joining in with the BC government pimping LNG to kids, has joined the wrong team.

Why would you go to a Science World that rejects the sociopolitical implications of (Read more…)

Things Are Good: Slow Increasing Carbon Waste by Growing Cities

People living in cities have a lower carbon footprint than those in the suburbs and rural areas. Some people find this rather counter intuitive for reasons I don’t fully understand. There are researchers looking into the future of our global carbon footprint and they have concluded that if we increase the percentage of people in urban places instead of suburban/rural we can lower the rate of wasteful carbon increase.

By taking these key steps, particularly in Asia, Africa and the Middle East, the analysis concluded that the world’s cities could limit themselves to using 540 exajoules of energy in 2050 (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Hugh Segal discusses the need for an open and honest conversation about poverty and how to end it. And to better reflect Canadians’ continued desire for a more fair society, Roderick Benns makes the case for a basic income as Canada’s next major social program.

- Matt Bruenig writes about the U.S.’ income inequality as compared to other developed countries- and it’s well worth noting that Canada’s distribution is only slightly less distorted than the U.S.’.

- Margo McDiarmid reports on the Cons’ latest steps to block any (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: Energy shift requires shift in conversation

The infrastructure already developed to accommodate cheap fossil fuels creates a psychological barrier to rational discourse on energy issues, says David Suzuki.

The post David Suzuki: Energy shift requires shift in conversation appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Cowichan Conversations: Paul Manly Now Seeking Green Party Nomination in Nanaimo-Ladysmith

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

The Federal NDP has turned their backs on many NDP values and shifted to the centre under the leadership of Thomas Mulcair.

A disturbing number of NDP member activists have been blocked from even seeking nominations.

What has happened to today’s NDP federally and provincially was once unthinkable.

Is this a harbinger of what lies ahead ?

Paul Manly

 

On Facebook Paul Manly was asked “What has changed?”

 

I will tell you what changed for me. You will know from my film work and my community organizing that I am solid and unequivocal on a (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: To limit global warming, 85% of Canada’s tar sands must stay in the ground: Study

A new study published in the scientific journal Nature says 85% of Canada’s dirty tar sands must “remain in the ground” to limit global warming.

The post To limit global warming, 85% of Canada’s tar sands must stay in the ground: Study appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Cowichan Conversations: This Changes Something

This fills in the blanks on many levels. Some folks will be tad upset with the ‘Reality Check’ but it is time to defrag and tune up grass roots response to criminal corporate destruction of the environment.

RJH

Naomi Klein Takes on the Big Greens

 

Emily McGratten

In Jonathan Franzen’s bestselling novel Freedom, the main character accepts a dream job from a billionaire philanthropist. He is charged with partnering with coal companies in West Virginia to set aside 100 square miles as pristine habitat for the Cerulean Warbler, an endangered songbird that is further threatened by coal mining operations. (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the OECD’s working paper showing that stronger environmental policies are entirely consistent with a more productive economy.

For further reading…- Obviously, the area where the need for more stringent regulation is most obvious lies in our CO2 emissions. On that front, CBC reports on Christopher McGlade and Paul Elkins’ study showing how many fossil fuels will need to stay in the ground to stay below a two degree temperature increase, while George Monbiot weighs in on the UK’s reckless plan to maximize the harm it does to our climate.- And as a reminder, Paul Krugman (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: President Obama Threatens To Veto Congress’ Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

U.S. President Barack Obama has threatened to veto a Congressional bill that would force the approval of TransCanada’s Keystone XL tar sands pipeline.

The post President Obama Threatens To Veto Congress’ Keystone XL Pipeline Bill appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Sam Pizzigati interviews Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett about the fight against inequality and the next piece of the puzzle to be put in place: [Pickett:]…In The Spirit Level, we have all these correlations between inequality and social problems, and we have theories and hypotheses about what is driving these correlations. But we didn’t know then whether or not the drivers we hypothesized — things like status anxiety — were actually higher in more unequal countries. Now those kinds of data are being used increasingly in psychological research. (Read more…)