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Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: France Has Law To Put Solar or Plants on Rooftops

I was impressed to learn that France had made new commercial buildings do this. I’ve felt badly that new buildings going up all over the University of Regina campus since I started paying attention to it in 1998, haven’t put a single solar panel up on them. There’s a building on Research Dr. with a round skylight that looks like a CD player, that would have been a perfect spot for some solar panels. At least the RIC building in 2006 had a partial green roof built onto its shady side.

reeves report: Can Elizabeth May Unmuzzle Canada’s Scientists?

Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May.

The success rate of private member’s bills in the federal parliament is abysmal. In the 100-plus years since 1910, Ottawa has passed just 271 of them. For comparison, more than 1,600 PMB’s were tabled between 1997 and 2015, and the rate at which they’re being drawn up is on the rise.

It’s not unusual for entire sessions of parliament to hum along without the passage of a single PMB. And when an errant private member’s bill does become law, more often than not the content of the bill is symbolic, proclaiming National Philanthropy Day (November (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Pope Francis offers hopeful perspective on global crises, says David Suzuki

Pope Francis’ recent encyclical on climate change contains a “scientifically and morally valid call for radical change”, says environmentalist David Suzuki.

The post Pope Francis offers hopeful perspective on global crises, says David Suzuki appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Carol Goar discusses the contrasting messages being sent to Canada’s middle class in the lead up to Canada’s federal election campaign – and notes that the real decision for voters to make is whether they’re happy with marginally higher nominal incomes at the expense of greater inequality and more precarious lives. Mark Goldring makes the case for an economy oriented toward what’s best for people rather than short-term profits: Tackling inequality requires that people, not profit constitute the bottom line. We need everyone who is in a position of influence – business (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Edward Keenan weighs in on the role a basic income could play in a job market marked by increasingly precarious work: I am an enthusiastic supporter of better workplace protections and wages. I have a good, unionized, stable job. I like it. But regulation of work and workplaces isn’t likely adequate to solve the problem we face. No matter how high minimum wages are, they will not help people unable to get a job that pays them. And there are a lot of reasons to think that no matter how good workplace safeguards (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: The Greens Could Deliver The Upcoming Election To Steve!

Richard Hughes-Your Humble Blogger

The conundrum of electing our governments based on a ‘First Past the Post’ system has never been as clear as it is today with an October Federal Election just around

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Cowichan Conversations: West Coast Environmental Law Supports Community Action Regarding Proposed Gravel Mine on Balme Ayre Farm

A petition to the Supreme Court of British Columbia has been filed on behalf of concerned Cowichan Valley residents by Ms. McKenzie requesting a judicial review of the Agricultural Land Commission’s approval to extract

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Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Thomas Edsall discusses how increased atomization is making it more difficult for people to join together in seeking change, no matter how obvious it is that there’s a need to counter the concentrated power and wealth of the privileged few: The cultural pressures driving inequality are…reinforced by heightened competition that has accelerated the decline of unions, served to justify the Republican refusal to raise minimum wages and undermined the workplace stature of employees. The result has been not only surging incomes at the top and little or no growth for the (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Tar Sands Documentary: To the Ends of the Earth

A documentary warning of the consequences of the unbridled expansion of Canada’s destructive tar sands, and the rise of extreme energy, is in the works.

The post Tar Sands Documentary: To the Ends of the Earth appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

- Sean Illing writes about the utterly misplaced view of the privileged few that they can or should be treated as immune from the environmental realities facing everybody: I see the decadence of the people in Rancho Santa Fe as a microcosm of America today, particularly corporate America. What these people exhibit, apart from their smugness, is a complete absence of any sense of collective responsibility. They can’t see and aren’t interested in the consequences of their actions. And they can’t muster a modicum of moderation in the face of enormous scarcity. Every resource, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Roderick Benns reports on Ryan Meili’s argument for a basic income: Dr. Ryan Meili was in Kingston, Ontario, recently to talk to more than 100 people about the importance of the social determinants of health in an event that was hosted by Basic Income Kingston. The social determinants of health influence health outcomes for people and include many components that work together, including income and income distribution, education, unemployment and job security, among others.

Meili described a basic income guarantee as “an exciting opportunity” and a kind of “social investment to counter inequality,” (Read more…)

In-Sights: Jumbo stumble

Eight months ago, Judith Lavoie wrote at DesmogCanada about Jumbo Glacier: Stuck in the ground, halfway down the valley trail leading into the proposed Jumbo Glacier Resort, is a stick, leaning crookedly against a small tree, inscribed with the word “Lift.”

About one kilometre away, at the bottom of a recently bulldozed track into soggy underbrush, is another marker with the words “Proposed Corner of Lodge.”

The two markers, reams of flagging tape, several parked backhoes and a drill, where two employees are watching a small stream of water run into the ditch, are the only apparent (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: Protesters Blockade Contaminated Soil Site in Shawnigan Lake

Protesting Shawnigan residents show no signs of giving up or backing down over the BC Liberal government’s approval allowing South Island Aggregates (SIA) to dump 5 million tonnes of contaminated soils on their Stebbings

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Bill Longstaff: Pope Francis and the moral imperative of dealing with global warming

It’s no surprise that Pope Francis only gave PM Stephen Harper 10 minutes for his interview earlier this month. And no surprise he looked constipated in his photo op with the Prime Minister. Ten minutes with Harper would freeze the bowels of anyone concerned about global warming, and, unlike the recalcitrant Harper, the Pope is very concerned indeed.

In his encyclical released today, he called

reeves report: Climate change could boost visitation to US National Parks by 2060

In silver lining news: the latest report from the U.S. National Park Service has found that increases in global temperature could boost tourism traffic to national parks from Alaska to Guam.

The report, released this week in the open access journal PLoS ONE, compared historical monthly mean air temperature information with data on park visitation between 1979 and 2013 at 340 parks. The team, led by natural resource scientist Nicholas Fisichelli, then contrasted projected future visitations between 2041 and 2060 with two climate-warming scenarios.

The result? Warmer temperatures put people in the mood to get outside. Visitation to America’s national parks (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Elias Isquith talks to David Madland about the connection between increasing inequality and the breakdown of trust in the U.S. political system. CBC and Larry Elliott follow up on the IMF’s findings about the economic damage done by income and wealth disparities. And Philip Longman thoroughly examines the cross-generational inequality which is putting every generation after the Baby Boomers at a severe disadvantage: Start, for example, with the twentysomethings of 1979. They had a lower real income in 1979 than twentysomethings did in 1969. And as fiftysomethings now, they not only make (Read more…)

In-Sights: Serving public or corporate interests?

The audio file below is a recording of my time with Ian Jessop June 17. We talk about LNG and resource taxation, inter-provincial cooperation on resource matters and oil spill response capability.

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In-Sights: Celebrate and protect our marine ecology

SLOW FISH – KNOW YOUR FISHERMAN from Kevin Kossowan on Vimeo.

A Puff of Absurdity: On Being an Ally

I’m not sure how to say this without being blasted, but I’ll try:  I might understand a little piece affecting Rachal Dolezal decision to present as black rather than be a white ally.

I just have one story.  It was about ten years ago.  I had just finished reading The History of Mary Prince: A West Indian Slave Narrative and was floored by it.  I couldn’t believe I had never heard of her before.  The story is compelling, and it’s a good length to offer to high school students.  I was curious if anyone else had tried teaching it (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: David Suzuki: The values of hope and happiness

David Suzuki on how our tendency to seek solace in material things as a reaction to threats such as terrorism and climate change causes more insecurity.

The post David Suzuki: The values of hope and happiness appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: “I wonder if she gets paid.”

I wonder if she gets paid. “@GreenpeaceCA: Arctic drilling is obscene. @Janefonda http://t.co/MRRx4vvo6o pic.twitter.com/2vAlfXhw5e”

— Vivian Krause (@FairQuestions) June 12, 2015

I wonder if she gets paid, to ask that.

In the same time frame, Krause received significant funding from the oil, gas and mining industries and has said 90 per cent of her income in 2012, 2013 and 2014 was drawn from speaking fees and honorariums funded by industry sources.

Krause said the “90 per cent” comment was out of context, because she had “zero” income aside from her speaking arrangements. Krause said (Read more…)

Canadian Dimension: Over 100 scientists call for oil sands moratorium

Photo by Jason Woodhead

A group of more than 100 leading scientists from both Canada and the United States called for a moratorium on new oil sands development at a June 10 telephone press conference.

The scientists laid out 10 reasons why continued expansion of the oil sands is incompatible with keeping climate change at a level that does not cause widespread harm. These include: a lack of adequate protections and baseline data; contamination of the Canadian boreal zone; a lack of land reclamation; oil sands development and transport undermining First Nations land rights; developments in North America setting a (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Chris Mooney takes a look at the positive side of social influences on behaviour, as new research shows a correlation between spending time with neighbours and an interest in the environmental issues which affect us all. But Adam Stoneman documents how another form of social interaction – that of wealth flaunting – promotes conspicuous consumption which benefits nobody.

- Tim Harper slams the Cons for looking to attack aboriginal Canadians rather than work with them – a particularly serious problem in the wake of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report. Don Martin writes (Read more…)

Canadian Dimension: 350 Responds to Canada’s G7 Commitments

Photo by Pete Souza

Press Release

Following the G7 meeting in which Canada joined other major polluters in committing to phase out fossil fuels by the end of the century, 350.org spokesman Cameron Fenton issued the following response:

“Setting a deadline 85 years from now to stop burning fossil fuels may be politically safe, but it completely ignores the science that says we need to leave the vast majority of coal, oil, and gas underground in order to avert catastrophic climate change. Time is of the essence, and every day is crucial as we work to wean our society (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: Steves–BC Doesn’t Need Site C Dam

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

It is incredible that our BC Liberal government, prodded along by the foreign owned LNG corporations, are still pushing ahead with building a massive Site C Dam.

We do not need

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