Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Liam Byrne argues that it’s long past time to reevaluate an economic framework which has produced only highly concentrated wealth for a lucky few at everybody else’s expense. And Graeme Wearden reports on Oxfam’s call to rein in both firm-level tax avoidance, and government policy oriented toward eliminating ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Alex Hemingway highlights the similarities between Justin Trudeau and Donald Trump in pushing infrastructure plans designed primarily to turn the promise of public services into long-term corporate profit centres: But as I described recently in the Canadian context, these “partnerships” have proven enormously costly: “P3s are simply ...

Accidental Deliberations: The Minister of Silly Excuses

Yes, Justin Trudeau has set up his predictable excuse for breaking his promise of electoral reform by putting a new minister in charge of the file during a crucial period. But let’s see what Karina Gould has had to say about a more fair democratic system in communicating with her constituents (PDF): Participants focused on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Colin Busby and Ramya Muthukumaran offer some suggestions as to how to ensure there’s an adequate social safety net to support people stuck with precarious work: Federal and provincial governments, acting in concert or independently, should reduce the uncertainties of a volatile labour market for newcomers and incumbents. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Christo Aivalis offers some suggestions for a set of progressive and effective tax policies: My view is that the Left has to combine the general philosophy of economic redistribution with the practical needs of getting the money to preserve existing social programs and build new ones. We have ...

Michal Rozworski: #RealChange wearing thin: A look back at Trudeau’s first year

We’re one year into Justin Trudeau’s government of #RealChange, yet it’s mostly the rhetoric not the policies that have changed. Some of the shine is finally wearing off. Whether approving pipelines, settting electoral reform up to fail or privatizing airports and transit, the Liberals are showing themselves to be the good capitalist managers they’ve always been, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Danielle Martin highlights how investments in ending poverty including a basic income can improve health outcomes among other key social indicators: Far more than consumption of medical care, income is the strongest predictor of health. Canadians are more likely to die at an earlier age and suffer more ...

CuriosityCat: Conrad Who? on why Trump is a genius

Here’s that voice from the past on Trump’s perception by Canadian commentators, and on his ability to change the contours of politics in American within six months: What mad national egotism, propelled by “arm-flapping moralism” (in the words of half-Canadian U.S. secretary of State Dean Acheson 60 years ago) propels Lawrence Martin to imagine that Canada ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jonathan Sas highlights why we’re best off having public services delivered by the public sector: The three decades long bashing and diminishing of the redistributive capacities of the state has led to pronounced inequality, degraded infrastructure stock, and a blunted ability of government to respond to current societal ...

CuriosityCat: Andrew Coyne on Justin Trudeau and discussing Uganda

The political uproar in Canada over the questionable (Read more…) used by the newish Trudeau Liberal government to raise funds though what seems to many to be a Cash for Access method, has not died down. Now Andre Coyne, one of Canada’s most astute journalists, has put this mess in a context that the Liberal ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dennis Pilon highlights how the stubborn defence of disproportional electoral systems can only be explained by a fear of voters’ preferences being given effect: The issue is not whether it’s better to have a few or a lot of parties in Parliament — that’s irrelevant. The issue ...

CuriosityCat: Trudeau’s Liberals pay a 20% price in poll of their bungling

Lack of Leadership takes a toll The Pay for Access scandal coupled with the incredible bungling of the very important electoral reform initiative, has led to a 20% drop in Liberal Party support: After soaring in public approval for more than a year, Justin Trudeau’s Liberals tumbled last month in a new poll that reflects ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne points out the significance of even central bankers like Mark Carney recognizing the desperate need to combat inequality. And Iglika Ivanova discusses how British Columbia’s election-year surplus represents a wasted opportunity to start addressing the social problems which the Libs have been exacerbating for a decade ...

CuriosityCat: How Trudeau’s Liberals failed Canada on electoral reform

The miscalculation that Justin Trudeau made regarding his solemn promise to bring about electoral change, is shown in this summary: The Liberals, however, decided to go one step further in eschewing conventional political practice: Instead of stacking their side of the table with wily veteran MPs, they assigned four first-timers to the task, while the ...

CuriosityCat: Electoral Reform: How Clustered are You?

I took the MyDemocracy test of my “values” today, and was place in one of the “clusters” chosen by Vox Pop Labs as representing all those who participate in the Trudeau Liberals reaching out to all Canadian households to find out their views on a few issues about reform. I set out below some of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Citizens for Public Justice laments the Libs’ and Cons’ joint effort to vote down the NDP’s push for a national anti-poverty strategy. And Sean Speer and Rob Gillezeau make the case for an improved Working Income Tax Benefit which should be palatable across the political spectrum. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the crisis of liberal democracy around the globe – and how we face our own obvious risks in Canada. For further reading…– Yascha Mounk’s research into the precarious state of democracy is discussed here by Amanda Taub. And Andrea Kendall-Taylor and Erica Frantz trace how a seemingly secure democracy can fall apart incrementally.  ...

Scott's DiaTribes: Mydemocracy.ca is an interestingly worded survey, to say the least.

In brief.. I took this because I’m interested in electoral reform. I took this because its the tool the government is going to use to gauge user response. I encourage everyone to go and participate. That said… some of the questions are leading to a conclusion to say the least – what we call a ...

CuriosityCat: Brexit surprise ahead for Trudeau Liberals if they break electoral reform promise

The Trap of Broken Promises We’ve seen in the UK, USA and now Italy, just how out of touch ruling elites are with the discontent bubbling below the surface of their citizens. And now Canada’s newly minted Prime Minister is apparently starting to substitute his election victory for the deeply-held desire by many citizens (Read ...

the disgruntled democrat: Considering What Just happened in the US, It should Be Painfully Obvious Why Canada Should Change Its Voting System

It’s hard to believe but it’s true.  Donald Trump is the President-elect of the United States of America.  A man who has never held a public office in his life now is Commander and Chief of the most potent and lethal military force in history.  Put another way, the fate of planet rests in the ...

Democracy Under Fire: Electoral Reform Report Solves Nothing.

A special all-party committee is recommending that the Trudeau government design a new proportional voting system and hold a national referendum to gauge how much Canadians would support it. ……… The report does not recommend precisely how a referendum should be conducted or how many electoral options Canadians should be asked to choose among, other ...

Northern Reflections: Not With A Bang But A Whimper

It’s beginning to look like electoral reform is dead in the water. In the end, Chantal Hebert writes, our political parties could not rise above partisan self interest: The Conservatives came into this discussion riding the referendum horse, and they come out of it more firmly in the saddle. They have not budged an inch ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon #ERRE Links

A bit of electoral reform material for your weekend reading. – Nathan Cullen points out how the Special Committee on Electoral Reform’s report (PDF) serves as an effective road map to make every vote count in Canada. – PressProgress highlights how the Libs are attacking their own campaign promises in order to preserve an unfair ...

CuriosityCat: PM Trudeau summed up by Chantal Hebert on electoral reform

Here’s the devastating article she wrote on how the Liberals, lead by Justin Trudeau, have mismanaged the election commitment to electoral reform: As for the Liberals, they have managed to turn a secondary policy front into a field of ruins. With the logistical clock ticking on moving to a different voting system in time (Read ...

We Pivot: Buy A Liberal Party Toque!

Yes, it’s been the worst week of lies and broken promises for Justin Trudeau. Pipelines. Electoral Reform. He is in tire fire mode. So yesterday the party threw him a seltzer bottle which we can now spray in his face. … [Read more]