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Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Carol Goar discusses the contrasting messages being sent to Canada’s middle class in the lead up to Canada’s federal election campaign – and notes that the real decision for voters to make is whether they’re happy with marginally higher nominal incomes at the expense of greater inequality and more precarious lives. Mark Goldring makes the case for an economy oriented toward what’s best for people rather than short-term profits: Tackling inequality requires that people, not profit constitute the bottom line. We need everyone who is in a position of influence – business (Read more…)

Left Over: Abuse of power & the Re-Education of Police …..

Michael Wood, ex-Baltimore officer, tweets about alleged police brutality Retired Baltimore officer Michael A. Wood tweets about disturbing things he allegedly witnessed on the force

By Lauren O’Neil, CBC News Posted: Jun 26, 2015 8:22 PM ET Last Updated: Jun 27, 2015 10:52 AM ET

This article might be a bit too late in the “sky is falling’ sector regarding the abuse of persons of colour, or police corruption, which, like gun violence, just go on and on and on, the most interesting part of Wood’s tweets, to me, was the fact that he praised higher education as giving him the (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Shared Knowledge Conference – Regina

These videos are from the second day of the Shared Knowledge Conference at the Core Ritchie Centre, the second weekend of June.

Jim Elliott with many interesting (and terrifying) facts about Regina’s watershed system.

We are on the Plaza @MarketRegina today. Find us beside @TrogiFoods #honey #salsa pic.twitter.com/wGd2bYiBVB

— Zee-Bee Honey® (@_zeebeehoney_) June 24, 2015

James and Brooke of Sound Solar Systems:

Next, I presented on Bitcoin and alternate currencies being used to build alternate economies apart from the monetary systems provided by governments.

Dan B. of Tradebank Regina

Lindsay H. wraps up with what’s in store for (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Saskboy’s Abandoned Stuff: Shared Knowledge Conference – Regina

Dead Wild Roses: Morse Code for Visual Learners – A Helpful Guide.

Makes more sense to me put in this format, go go go magic of the internet.

Filed under: Education Tagged: Helpful Hints, Morse Code, Visual media

Paul S. Graham: Video: Manitoba government urged to recognize the genocide and help heal the trauma

Winnipeg, June, 5, 2015: At the Manitoba Legislative Building, Maeengan Linklater answers journalists’ questions about his proposed Manitoba Indian Residential Schools Genocide and Reconciliation Memorial Day Act. Photo: Paul S. Graham

Now that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada has completed its work, and the major federal political parties have have adopted predictable positions, what can ordinary folk do to make sure Justice Sinclair’s message isn’t lost between now and the election this fall?

I’m rather taken with a draft Act that was made public yesterday on the steps of the Manitoba Legislature that would set aside one day a (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Paul S. Graham: Video: Manitoba government urged to recognize the genocide and help heal the trauma

Trashy's World: Volunteerism – get involved, damn it!

I have written before about volunteerism and what is means to me. From volunteering at one’s school to participating in our civic processes, volunteering is a way to “give back” (I’m not particularly fond of that term) to the community and to gain a certain measure of self-satisfaction in the process. I have given up a lot of […]

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Genevieve LeBaron, Johanna Montgomerie, and Daniela Tepe-Belfrage write that inequality is getting worse in the UK based on class, gender and all kinds of other grounds, while a supposed “recovery” isn’t benefiting anybody except the people who least need it: (E)conomic policies associated with ‘recovery’ in the UK have deepened inequality and exclusion along the overlapping lines of class, gender, race, ability, age and sexuality. Sweeping welfare reforms, for instance, are disproportionately targeting women and low-income couples with children, with particularly dire consequences for single mothers. The newly imposed ‘bedroom (Read more…)

Left Over: The Fundamental(ist) Reasons for It All…..

Rise of the ‘precariat,’ the global scourge of precarious jobs Barely one in four of the global workforce has a stable job, UN reports

By Brian Stewart, CBC News Posted: Jun 01, 2015 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jun 01, 2015 8:36 AM ET

Back in the 7-‘s, when i was a young thing just learning about Zero Population Growth, I decided it was probably not a great idea to have children..I was single and determined to stay that way, had little income to spare, and I sincerely believed that things were going to get much worse due to overpopulation (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Saskatchewan Party’s devaluation of the music teacher (among other cultural and community-building parts of our schools).

For further reading…- CBC reported on the Prairie Spirit School Division’s decision to eliminate school bands here, and Janet French did likewise here.- The Star-Phoenix’ editorial board weighed in here. And now, even the Saskatchewan Party is pretending to oppose what its policy choices have wrought.- And for those looking to support the students trying to save their band program, Shawna Langer’s petition is here.

Dead Wild Roses: Raindrops Should Not Exist – So says Physics

Well that is a sticky wicket if I’ve heard of one. I’ll post the answer video as well, but see if you know before you watch the second part (No peeking!).

And the spoiler…

Filed under: Education, Science Tagged: Just say no to Raindrops, Minute Earth, Minute Physics

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Matthew Yglesias points out that a particular income level may have radically different implications depending on an individual’s place in life, and that we can only address inequality by formulating policy accordingly: The median household income in the United States is about $52,000. So go ahead and picture a median-income household. What did you picture?

Did you picture a 25-year-old with a decent job who’s maybe worried about student loans but is basically doing okay? Or did you picture a married pair of 45-year-olds who are both full-time workers stuck in kinda crappy (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: How to Subtract by Adding – Minute Physics

Damn, and you think that Math would be straightforward. I’m contemplating throwing this at students when I get to sub in for a Math teacher – I can’t wait.

Filed under: Education, Science Tagged: Adding by Subtracting, Minute Physics

Dead Wild Roses: Behold! The Power of Penguin Poo.

I’m so pumped, I can barely handle the excrement over this topic…

Filed under: Education, Humour Tagged: Humour, Penguin Poo

Northern Insight / Perceptivity: Black Press proves its news instincts once again

A spy in the Prince Rupert region provided information that would probably surprise the unscholarly urban dwellers at the Koch brothers’ favourite Canadian policy institution: Fraser institute identifies Conrad Elementary as one of the fastest improving schools in the province, based in part on improvements at the grade 7 level. What they fail to notice is that Conrad hasn’t had any grade 7′s in four years, since we went to a K-5, middle school configuration. The devil is in the details, yes?

Indeed, Conrad Street Elementary is unique, not at all one of the cookie cutter schools filled with children (Read more…)

Scripturient: Blog & Commentary: Ontario’s Sex Education

As Frank Zappa sang in his 1968 song, What’s The Ugliest Part Of Your Body?: What’s the ugliest Part of your body? What’s the ugliest Part of your body? Some say your nose Some say your toes I think it’s your mind, your mind, I think it’s YOUR MIND, woo woo I’m not a fan […]

Northern Insight / Perceptivity: BC schools and school children at risk

After the event that killed thousands, injured tens of thousands and affected millions of Nepalese, a Berkeley seismologist spoke about preparations needed in regions with high seismic activity. Dr. Peggy Hellweg said: Probably the most important factor in building collapses is the construction of the building, the structure. In general all buildings constructed in an old style, which is stone on stone; or stone, mortar and stone; are very, very susceptible to earthquakes.

Ten years ago, the BC’s provincial budget made this unequivocal commitment: “Funding is also provided to seismically upgrade all at-risk schools within 15 years.”

(Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: Budweiser Stops Pandering to Rapists?

Budweiser, the perfect beer for rapists:

Being up for whatever happens [even with its own hashtag: #UpForWhatever]

+

an evening environment that doesn’t include no in its vocabulary

+

all within our still vibrant rape culture

=

a recipe for Budweiser to demonstrate how pathetic they are at understanding how communication works.

And they end up being complicit in continuing to promote rape culture and a world where explicit consent for sex is either ignore, downplayed or rejected.

They still haven’t apologized, but they have said that they regret missing the mark. Continue to not expect integrity from corporations:

(Read more…)

Things Are Good: Rethinking Environmental Education Under Neoliberalism

Neoliberalism is the current way of thinking about the economic state of the world. It’s the thinking that has led to the financialization of nearly everything in the world – think about how we justify our thinking in economic terms and not other terms.

The critiques of the mind-numbing neoliberal approach to thinking are growing and the most recent issue Environmental Education Research examines how neoliberalism is changing how we teach. This is good because we need to move our way of thinking beyond an economics-only framework, the more we critique neoliberalism the better the world we can create.

“Environmental (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Trish Hennessy writes that the Cons’ budget is based purely on wishful thinking and deliberate denial rather than any rational plan. PressProgress identifies just a few of the problems which can’t be put off for two generations, no matter how determined Joe Oliver is to push any responsible government past his own lifetime. Adam Radwanski spots what may be a ready-made mechanism for the Cons to announce pork barrel projects without counting them in the federal budget. And Stephen Tapp writes that it shouldn’t be hard for opposition parties to find fiscal (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: Three Cheers for the Calgary Expo – Angry Man Babies Explode in Rage!

All of the following has been cribbed from David Futrelle’s We Hunted the Mammoth – Thank you David for doing the heavy lifting on this one.

“The Honey Badgers — a mostly female A Voice for Men spinoff group known for its unlistenable internet “radio” shows — was sent packing after conventioneers complained about their connections to #GamerGate — a nine-month-long orgy of harassment targeting outspoken women in gaming and their supporters — and their alleged disruption of a panel devoted to women in comics.

According to Calgary Expo officials, the group was kicked out for “actively disregarding” the Expo’s efforts (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: How Equal Do We Want the World? – Dan Ariely

More than you’d think really. Human beings seem to intrinsically value fairness and equality and yet, as of today have constructed societies based on moving as far away as possible from any sort of equitable norm.

Take note of the piece on John Rawls and how using the Veil of Ignorance idea as a cognitive filter for making decisions. I think it is a great idea adding to the list of processes one should go through in making tough decisions in the personal, moral and political sphere.

Filed under: Culture, Education, Ethics Tagged: Dan Ariely, (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Where Abstinence Sex-Ed Goes Wrong

She's being completely condescending. "You can look up anything on the internet" Then refers him to site on abstinence education!

— Alice Dreger (@AliceDreger) April 15, 2015

"You'll find a good girl. If you find one that says 'no,' that's the one you want." HE ACTUALLY JUST SAID THAT.

— Alice Dreger (@AliceDreger) April 15, 2015

This hilariously depressing account of an American sex-ed classroom is a sight to behold.

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- PressProgress documents how the Cons are driving Canada’s economy into the ditch. And Michael Babad reports that economists with a better grounding in reality than Stephen Harper are begging the provinces not to impose the austerity demanded by the Cons.

- Kara Santokie writes that if the Cons’ balanced-budget legislation has any effect at all, it will be to attack Canada’s social programs when they’re needed most. And Louis-Philippe Rochon sees the false balance bill as standing out even among the Cons’ bad ideas.

- Dylan Matthews questions whether workers present and (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: Theramin Trees – The Why Behind the Channel

I’m a fan of TT’s channel and the work that he does. Adding a patreon option to his toolkit may allow him to produce more thoughtful videos.

https://www.patreon.com/theramintrees

Filed under: Education Tagged: Signal Boost, theramin trees

Susan on the Soapbox: Jim Prentice’s Budget: The Not-So-Subtle Language of Money

“There is no fortress so strong that money cannot take it.” — Cicero

On Mar 24, 2015 Jim Prentice sent Albertans a message of such heartless cynicism that only the most naïve amongst us would fail to understand.

Money talks.

Here’s what Jim Prentice’s Budget 2015* told Albertans.

Corporations matter, you don’t

When asked why the government did not raise corporate taxes, Finance Minister Robin Campbell replied “The corporate sector is going to do their part, but we have to do our part also.”**

This is utter nonsense.

Mr Campbell looking somber

The corporate sector did its part (Read more…)