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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Robert Reich describes how U.S. voters are rejecting the concept of a ruling class from both the left and the right – while noting that it’s vital to get the answer right as to which alternative is worth pursuing. And Owen Jones sees Jeremy Corbyn’s rise as an inevitable response to the emptiness of New Labour in the UK: Corbyn’s campaign has been unique in the Labour leadership campaign in actually offering coherent policies and a fleshed-out economic strategy: a radical housing programme; tax justice; democratic public ownership of utilities and (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Chantal Panozzo discusses the lack of work-life balance which serves as the default in the U.S. – and notes how preposterous precarious work looks once a person has experienced an alternative: Before I moved to Switzerland for almost a decade, American Reality was all I knew. I was living in a two-bedroom apartment making $30,000 a year in a job where I worked almost seven days a week with no overtime pay and received 10 days of paid time off a year.

In other words, for the hours worked, I was making (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Official transcript of Stephen Harper’s remarks launching the 2015 federal election

Launching the 2015 federal election on Aug 2, Stephen Harper said he will ask “Canadians for their support to continue to deliver sound economic management”

The post Official transcript of Stephen Harper’s remarks launching the 2015 federal election appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Canadian Progressive: TPP talks fail: Part of Harper’s disastrous economic project ends, says Council of Canadians

The recent failure of the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations spoils Harper’s agenda promoting the corporate takeover of the Canadian public good, says the Council of Canadians.

The post TPP talks fail: Part of Harper’s disastrous economic project ends, says Council of Canadians appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Politics Canada: Stephen Harper: the worst economic performance of any PM in 70 years

We have known this for a long time: Stephen Harper is really bad for the Canadian economy. Actually he is the worst, read the whole article here.

Here are his scores in 6 key areas.

1. Stephen Harper has steered Canada’s economy to its lowest levels of growth in 69 years

With an average annual real GDP growth rate of 1.6%, under Stephen Harper’s tenure the Canadian economy grew by nearly half the rate it did for his predecessors in the decade before he took office. It was nearly three times worse than Canada’s growth rate during the 1950s (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Asorted content for your weekend reading.

- Ezra Klein talks to Bernie Sanders about how to build a more fair economy in the U.S. and around the globe. And Lynn Parramore interviews Tony Atkinson about the options available to rein in economic inequality – and why we should be working on putting them in place: LP: Some of the possible prescriptions you discuss, such as a basic income for all citizens, may sound radical, but you point out that they are actually already implemented as policy in many countries in various ways. Are ideas like basic income getting more (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Shannon Gormley points out how the Cons’ actions to strip voting rights from Canadians abroad sticks out like a sore thumb compared to an international trend of recognizing that citizenship doesn’t end merely because a person crosses a border. And Peter Russell and Semra Sevi lament that it’s too late to reverse the damage before this fall’s federal election, while the Star makes the broader point that we should be encouraging rather than limiting voter participation.

- Andrew Nikiforuk exposes how the U.S.’s green light to fracking has led to far (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: WikiLeaks reveals CBC and Canada Post may be sold under TPP agreement

A confidential letter leaked by WikiLeaks on Wednesday reveals that the CBC and Canada Post could be sold under the secretive Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement, currently being negotiated by Canada and 11 other countries in Maui, Hawaii.

The post WikiLeaks reveals CBC and Canada Post may be sold under TPP agreement appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Alan Freeman discusses the need for an adult conversation about taxes to replace the Cons’ oft-repeated policy of ignorance: Focusing on low taxes is great politics. It’s also a really dumb way to run the economy of an advanced industrialized country. Getting taxes right is a complex balance. Raise them too high — particularly taxes on income — and you risk creating disincentives for productive work, which can make your economy uncompetitive. Set them too low and you threaten the social programs and public goods that are fundamental to our values as (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Murray Dobbin writes that Canadians should indeed see the federal election as a choice between security and risk – with the Cons’ failing economic policies representing a risk we can’t afford to keep taking: (N)ot only is Harper vulnerable on his own limited anti-terror grounds, he is extremely vulnerable when it comes to the kind of security that actually affects millions of Canadians. When it comes to economic and social security, the vast majority of Canadians haven’t been this insecure since the Great Depression.

It’s not as if we don’t know the numbers (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: The Lemming Party of Canada

Shorter Scott Reid: There is no indignity which we Libs we won’t suffer, and no evil which we won’t allow ourselves to be strongarmed into supporting, if it means marginally saving face for the leader irresponsible enough to embrace them in the first place.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Jerry Dias discusses how the Cons have pushed Canada into an avoidable recession by slashing useful funding in order to send out pre-election baubles: How far has Canada’s economic star fallen? Only recently Prime Minister Stephen Harper boasted that Canada’s economy was “the envy of the entire world.” That claim was always overstated. Now it is downright ludicrous.

The Bank of Canada cut interest rates for the second time this year, but few expect this to pull us out of the tailspin. After all, Canadians are already tapped out: household debt now (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Christopher Majka reviews Henry Mintzberg’s Rebalancing Society as a noteworthy discussion of the need for balance between the public, private and “plural” sectors. And David Madland is pleased to see the U.S.’ Democrats finally fighting back against the view that the corporate sector is the only one worth favouring through government.

- But there’s far more to be done in putting the public back in public policy – particularly when, as Bill Tieleman points out, we’re being asked to accept more and more strict “trade” agreements designed to ensure (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

- Anna Leventhal warns against the danger that even the best-intentioned of charity drives might be seen as replacing the need for social supports: Now campaigns are ubiquitous, and range from book tours to pet surgeries to basic subsistence for marginalized people in crisis. But with crowdfunding increasingly called on to plug the holes left by funding cuts (consider that in 2014 Canadians pledged over $27 million to Kickstarter alone, and that from 2013 to 2014 the amount crowdfunded globally jumped from US$6.1 billion to US$16.2 billion), the stakes are getting higher (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Barbara Tasch writes about the IMF’s latest research on growing inequality in developing and developed countries alike. And Michael Krassa and Benjamin Radcliff study the impact an improved minimum wage can have on economic well-being: Simply stated, as the minimum wage increases, the economic wellbeing of the national population rises. Statistically speaking this relationship is a strong one, significant at the .001 level.… Here’s the bottom line: Regardless of the size of a country’s economy, its current economic situation, or the time frame chosen, people lead better lives as the minimum wage increases.

(Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Brad Wall On “Sustainably Developing Our Energy Resources”

Originally posted on John Klein – Regina:

Brad Wall says “…we need to do better in terms of more sustainably developing our energy resources…”

Unfortunately what he means is he wants to find ways of ensuring fossil fuels and uranium come out of the ground at an increasingly profitable pace, no matter the world’s demand/need for such things. Greg Fingas views it as such, too.

New blog post: For @PremierBradWall pride is all about corps burning resources, not ppl accomplishing goals http://t.co/US6QUaXtWv#skpoli

— Greg Fingas (@juristblog) July 17, 2015

He notes that oil pride goes “Before the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Carol Goar rightly criticizes Stephen Harper’s plan to deal with an apparent recession by making Canada’s economy even worse off through yet more cuts. Andrew Jackson writes that denying or ignoring an economic downturn won’t make it go away, while Louis-Philippe Rochon traces its origins to the Cons’ own ill-fated choices. And Michal Rozworski makes the case for stimulus which would both boost our economy in the short term, and better position it for the longer term: (T)here is a space and an opening here in which to push for alternatives. The (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Covering for Recession Stephen

Shorter Stephen Poloz: Economic reality has a well-known anti-Conservative bias. So in the interest of neutrality, I refuse to apply common terminology to reality.

The Cracked Crystal Ball II: On Recession Economies

So, today the Bank of Canada lowered its prime lending rate to 0.5%.  Supposedly, this signals that Canada is sliding into a recession.

Those of us who have been watching have long ago figured out that the minute the bubble burst on oil prices, Canada was going to slide into a recession.  Arguably, if you aren’t in the oil patch, Canada has been in a recession for the last four or five years.  What am I talking about here?

Jobs.  Sure, the government has posted “new jobs growth” regularly, but let’s be honest with ourselves here.  Most of the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- tcnorris highlights how the Cons’ gratuitous cuts are undermining their hopes of staying in power. And Eric Pineault discusses the costs of austerity for Quebec in particular and Canada as a whole: (C)utting into spending slows down growth and keeps the economy in a stagnation trap. The resulting underemployment equilibrium puts a lot pressure on household revenues just as those same households are getting into debt. We are thus faced with a second paradox: in a stagnating economy, trying to use austerity to reduce public debt also translates into an increased burden of (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Jim Stanford highlights how the Cons are focused on exactly the wrong priority in pushing for cuts at a time when Canada’s economy is in dire need of a jump-start: In the grand economic scheme, a deficit incurred as the economy slows is neither surprising nor undesirable.  But the Tories’ commitment to deficit elimination, no matter what, is all about politics.  First, it justified the big “social engineering” tax cuts (income splitting, so-called child support, etc.) that they announced last year as the centrepiece of their re-election campaign.  (Read more…)

Trashy's World: Harper is talking about our recession…

… er, economic downturn in front of a crowd of Grade fivers because… – They are only a few years younger than the PMO short pant staffers who set up this photo-op, so could talk about cool stuff common to them in between takes… – He has found a group of economic advisors with better insights […]

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Adrian Morrow reports on Al Gore’s explanation as to how the fight against climate change can be economically as well as environmentally beneficial, while CTV points out a new Nanos poll showing that Canadians largely agree with the view that cleaner technology can and should replace dirty fossil fuels. And Gary Mason argues that a summer of drought and wildfires should lead us to pay particularly close attention to climate change in this fall’s election.

- But as per usual, the people making obscene amounts of money from environmental degradation aren’t going (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- PressProgress makes the case that we can’t afford to risk another term of government neglect by the Harper Cons. Jeremy Nuttall discusses how the Cons’ fixed election date and anti-social economic policies each figure to cause direct damage to Canada’s economy in the course of a downturn. And Michael Harris discusses the utter implausibility of the Cons’ spin on the economic and security alike.

- Meanwhile, Sophia Harris tells the stories of a few of the Canadians already suffering the consequences of an anti-worker government. And Roderick Benns interviews Toni Pickard about the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how we should be taking the crisis in Greece and other global instability as reasons to ensure Canada retains the authority to act in its own interest – rather than excuses for rendering ourselves just as helpless as Greece itself.

For further reading…

- Mark Blyth nicely documents the origins of the debt now being held over Greece’s head, while Sara Yasin and Emilie Munson take a look at who was really bailed out from Greece’s borrowing in the wake of the global financial crisis.

- Amanda Taub writes that neither Greece nor anybody else really knew (Read more…)