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Alberta Politics: Doff hats to Don Getty, father of Family Day – too bad about that August holiday

PHOTOS: Don Getty, premier, celebrating the first Family Day in 1990. No! wait! That’s Don Getty, quarterback, celebrating the Edmonton Eskimos’ Grey Cup victory in 1956. Same guy, though. Who says actual Alberta politicians may not appear exactly … . . . → Read More: Alberta Politics: Doff hats to Don Getty, father of Family Day – too bad about that August holiday

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada Once Again Adding Value to Its Exports

In the course of researching a forthcoming commentary on Canada’s trade policy for the good folks over at the IRPP, I stumbled upon a surprising and encouraging bit of data. I grouped Statistics Canada’s series on exports and imports by broad commodity grouping (CANSIM Table 228-8059) into three categories: 4 primary sectors (including agriculture, energy, […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada Once Again Adding Value to Its Exports

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada After Harper

Here is the link to buy a new book, Canada After Harper, edited by Ed Finn and with an introduction by Ralph Nader, just published by Lorimer.

Most Canadians know that Stephen Harper has had a tremendous impact on the country since becoming prime minister in 2006. But few have the in-depth knowledge of how . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada After Harper

Politics and its Discontents: The Vindication Of Thomas Mulcair

Some will remember the abuse heaped upon NDP leader Thomas Mulcair back in 2012 when he said that Canada was suffering from the same Dutch disease that afflicted the Netherlands after natural gas fields boosting that nation’s currency reduced the competitiveness of its exports back in the 1970s. The culprit in Canada was the unrestrained . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The Vindication Of Thomas Mulcair

The Progressive Economics Forum: Banks and Balanced Budgets

The Bank of Canada surprised most analysts this week when it decided to cut rates by 25 basis points. The move comes after the price of oil has tumbled below $50 / barrel, oil producers announced huge cuts to business investment for 2015, Target announced a mass layoff of 17,600 workers in Canada, and the . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Banks and Balanced Budgets

The Disaffected Lib: What’s a Single Issue Prime Minister to Do?

These are not good times for Canada’s petro-prime minister.  Harper’s Holy Grail, Canadian energy superpowerdom, has sprung a leak.  Even The Globe & Mail, says bitumen no longer makes any economic sense.

If $40 a barrel still seems a ways off, consider that the benchmark price for oil sands crude is already trading in . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: What’s a Single Issue Prime Minister to Do?

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Jessica McCormick and Jerry Dias respond to Stephen Poloz’ view that young workers should be happy to work for free, and note that he of all people shouldn’t be pointing the finger at individuals to address problems with systemic unemployment: The most infuriating aspect of Poloz’s statement is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

daveberta.ca - Alberta politics: Underdog Liberal has a shot in Fort McMurray-Athabasca by-election

TweetFour federal by-elections will be held across Canada on June 30, 2014, including in Alberta’s Macleod and Fort McMurray-Athabasca ridings made vacant by the retirements of Conservative Members of Parliament Ted Menzies and Brian Jean months ago. While most general elections in Alberta can be counted on to result in broad Conservative sweeps, Albertans have . . . → Read More: daveberta.ca – Alberta politics: Underdog Liberal has a shot in Fort McMurray-Athabasca by-election

daveberta.ca - Alberta politics: Who wants to be leader of the Alberta NDP?

TweetWhile most political chatter in Alberta is focused on how big Jim Prentice’s victory will be on the first ballot of the Progressive Conservative leadership vote on September 6, there is another race about to begin – the race to become the leader of the Alberta NDP. At his press conference announcing departure, outgoing NDP . . . → Read More: daveberta.ca – Alberta politics: Who wants to be leader of the Alberta NDP?

The Canadian Progressive: Alberta Tar Sands Boom Poses Economic Risks to Canada: Report

A new report by the Pembina Institute and Équiterre warns that the rapid pace of Alberta tar sands development poses economic risks to Canada, other provinces.

The post Alberta Tar Sands Boom Poses Economic Risks to Canada: Report appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Disaffected Lib: Even Norway Gets the Dutch Disease

We sometimes think of Norway as the country where fossil fuel riches are handled responsibly, not like the Alberta and Canadian governments that just piss it all away.  Yes, Norway has amassed an impressive sovereign wealth fund from its Statoil royalties but, beyond that, it has many of the same problems that confront Canada.  . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Even Norway Gets the Dutch Disease

The Progressive Economics Forum: A Taxonomy of Linkages

As we discuss Dutch disease and the staples trap, it is good to be reminded that these discussions can benefit by being put in the context of Albert Hirschman’s linkages from commodity/resource/staple export. It so happens that a recent monograph begins with Hirschman and then elaborates on his linkages, and applies them in case studies. . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: A Taxonomy of Linkages

Politics and its Discontents: The Strange Economics of Stephan Harper

Even though he only has a Master’s degree in economics, our Prime Minister likes to present himself as an economist. And, like the myriad other untruths propagated by his regime, perhaps the biggest lie is that resource extraction, especially tarsands oil, is the most prudent activity around which the Canadian economy shuld revolve. Indeed, the . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The Strange Economics of Stephan Harper

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Paul Adams highlights how the Cons and their anti-social allies have spent decades trying to convince Canadians that it’s not worth trying to pursue the goals we value – and how the main challenge for progressives is to make the case that a better future is possible: This . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: Dutch Disease is Dead … Long Live Dutch Disease!!!

In the hyper-polarized context of Canadian energy policy debates, even suggesting that there might be a downside to the untrammeled energy boom centred in northern Alberta is enough to get you labelled a traitor or an economic illiterate — or both. Conservative political leaders in both Ottawa and Edmonton, backed by energy-friendly think-tanks and the . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Dutch Disease is Dead … Long Live Dutch Disease!!!

The Progressive Economics Forum: The IMF and the Canadian Manufacturing Crisis

A background study for the latest IMF report on Canada (see pages 42 to 51) adds further weight to the argument that the rise in the exchange rate of the Canadian dollar, driven in large part by high commodity prices, has underpinned a sharp decline in the US market share of Canadian manufacturers since 2000 . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: The IMF and the Canadian Manufacturing Crisis

Alberta Diary: Sorry about what we said, Tom, but spare a sigh for Alberta, latest victim of Dutch Disease

These typical Albertans may be victims of Dutch Disease. Who would have thought just weeks ago they were wearing slim-cut jeans, ostrich-hide boots and nice Resistol hats like the people below? It’s pathetic, really! Below: Federal NDP Leader Tom Mulcair, sorry Tom; Alberta Premier Alison Redford. All images just found on the Internet.

. . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Sorry about what we said, Tom, but spare a sigh for Alberta, latest victim of Dutch Disease

Montreal Simon: The Con Assault on the Dutch Disease

Nothing Tom Mulcair has ever said scares Stephen Harper more than his claim that the Dutch Disease is killing jobs all over Canada. Especially in vote-rich Ontario where the next election will be decided.Because if the people in that province ever realize how much Harper's Alberta First economic policies are hurting them and the . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: The Con Assault on the Dutch Disease

An individual with opinions.: Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak and party admits Dutch Disease contributes to decline in Ontario jobs.

I was reading through the Ontario Progressive Conservatives White Paper on unions, and I came across a most interesting part. Page 6, emphasis mine,When the Canadian dollar had a low value relative to the American dollar, many Canadian business were sl… . . . → Read More: An individual with opinions.: Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak and party admits Dutch Disease contributes to decline in Ontario jobs.

An individual with opinions.: Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak and party admits Dutch Disease contributes to decline in Ontario jobs.

I was reading through the Ontario Progressive Conservatives White Paper on unions, and I came across a most interesting part. Page 6, emphasis mine,

When the Canadian dollar had a low value relative to the American dollar, many Canadian business were slow to increase productivity. For a time they could afford rigid labour contracts and . . . → Read More: An individual with opinions.: Ontario Progressive Conservative leader Tim Hudak and party admits Dutch Disease contributes to decline in Ontario jobs.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– I’ll follow up with one extra note from Mark Carney’s address to the CAW – as the headlines seem to have missed a rather important point about the relative effect of the Canadian dollar and even the widest possible definition of labour issues: He noted Canada’s export . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Sum Of Us deserves plenty of credit for highlighting Enbridge’s attempt to delete a thousand square kilometers of treacherous and sensitive islands in order to sugar-coat the dangers of shipping oil out of Kitimat. But it’s also worth noting that the issue goes beyond the precise site . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Bill Longstaff: Australia’s Dutch disease

Canada is not alone in suffering from the insidious Dutch disease. Australia, too, is feeling the pain. Whereas Canada’s version is caused by booming tar sands production, Australia’s is caused by booming iron and coal production.

The resources industry is credited in part for keeping Australia out of recession and insulating it from the worst . . . → Read More: Bill Longstaff: Australia’s Dutch disease

Alberta Diary: Risky theories… Dangerous economic experiments…. Can we afford Harper’s Conservatives?

Prime Minister Stephen Harper… (Creepy Voice): “Dangerous experiments and risky economic theories. Can we afford these Conservatives much longer?” Below: Leo de Bever and a youthful Paul Krugman.

The Conservative government of Prime Minister Stephen Harper and its Alberta branch plant known as the Wildrose Party continue to push risky economic theories.

Funnily . . . → Read More: Alberta Diary: Risky theories… Dangerous economic experiments…. Can we afford Harper’s Conservatives?

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Michael Harris slams the Cons for their attacks on science: How far has the government been prepared to go to smother the facts surrounding the ELA? For starters, DFO declined all requests from the media to speak with scientists. Being an equal lack-of-opportunity employer, DFO also turned . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links