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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Mary O’Hara reviews Daniel Hatcher’s new book on the U.S.’ poverty industry which seeks to exploit public supports for private gain:(A) new book published last week by law professor and advocate Daniel… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Christopher Majka reviews Henry Mintzberg’s Rebalancing Society as a noteworthy discussion of the need for balance between the public, private and “plural” sectors. And David Madland is pleased to see the U.S.’ Democrats finally fighting back against the view that the corporate sector is the only one . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Michael Schwartz and Kevin Young make the case for a greater focus on influencing corporations and other institutions first and foremost – with the expectation that more fair public policy will be possible if a dominant business sector doesn’t stand in the way. David Wessel points out that . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Sara Mojtehedzadeh highlights how Ontario employers are exploiting temporary workers rather than making any effort to offer jobs which can support a life: Under Ontario’s antiquated Employment Standards Act, which is currently under review, there is no limit on how long a company can employ a worker as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Jeffrey Simpson lambastes the Cons’ determination to slash taxes and hand out baubles to the rich for the sole purpose of undermining the fiscal capacity of government to help Canadians. And Jeremy Nuttall highlights how a cuts to the CRA are allowing tax cheats to escape paying their . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Jason Warick reports on how the Cons’ decison to gut federal environmental assessments will have a particularly acute effect on Saskatchewan: The federal government has cancelled nearly 700 environmental assessments in Saskatchewan for oil wells and pipelines, sewage lagoons, hydro projects, a major uranium tailings facility and other . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– On the anniversary of Jack Layton’s death, Tim Harper points out how far the NDP has come in just a year, while Brian Topp highlights where the party still needs to go: (W)hat to do about the federal government’s crisis of relevance? Recent Liberal and Conservative governments have . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading.

– Michael Harris neatly sums up the Harper Cons’ legacy: In many ways, the Harper legacy will come down to this: how much can he get away with? Incumbency furnishes a speedy getaway car. From a legislative perspective, Harper might as well be King Tut. He can do whatever . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

This and that for your weekend reading.

– Doug Saunders points out that we have a relatively simple choice between seeking to exact revenge on criminal offenders and actually reducing crime: We know exactly why Norway has such lower recidivism numbers. Prisoners, being under constant observation, are very easy to study, and they’ve been studied . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 23, 2012

Monday, April 23 was the first day back in the House of Commons following the Easter break. And it featured some of the most lively and telling discussion we’ve seen yet on the Cons’ anti-refugee legislation as the second-reading debate reached its end.

The Big Issue

As part of the refugee bill debate, Craig Scott . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review – April 23, 2012

Accidental Deliberations: No tough choice

Back here, I discussed how ridiculous the Cons’ “tough on crime” model would look if applied to any other area of policy – and used that comparison to question why we’d handle criminal justice any differently. But after a minority government period where the Cons mostly limited their shows of faux bravado to attacking unsympathetic . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: No tough choice

Accidental Deliberations: A Healthy Society – Chapter 5 Discussion

Chapter 5 of Ryan Meili’s A Healthy Society deals with our justice system. And once again while there’s little to dispute in Meili’s broader point, it’s worth noting just how much distance there is between Canada’s current governing philosophy, and anything which could possible be expected to produce healthy outcomes.

Here’s Meili: (Our prison system) . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: A Healthy Society – Chapter 5 Discussion

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– In the last couple of days’ worth of developments on Robocon, the Cons defaulted to their standard setting of admitting nothing and misleading about everything – though it’s hard to see that strategy working out well given the amount of information that’s already coming to light. Dan . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– In the surest sign yet that the Robocon scandal involved a calculated decision by political operatives rather than having anything to do with mere overzealous volunteers, the Star reports that call centre staff hired by the Cons to perform live calling actually tried to correct the false information . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 9, 2011

Friday, December 9 saw the final day of debate at second reading on the Cons’ seat allocation bill. And as usual, plenty of valid questions went entirely unanswered.

The Big Issue

Marc-Andre Morin rightly questioned the Cons’ trumped-up sense of urgency in dealing with seat allocations while they do nothing but put off citizens’ genuinely . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 9, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 8, 2011

Thursday, December 8 saw debate on four separate bills – though once again, the Harper Cons were most conspicuous by their silence on a bill they were in the process of ramming through Parliament.

The Big Issue

That would be the Senate patch job which was being debated at second reading. And once again, the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 8, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Mike de Souza’s report on the Cons’ attempts to hide both the oil industry’s involvement and its own lack of credibility is well worth a read in full. But let’s focus on a more basic revelation: Harper has set up a publicly-funded lobbying team to make sure . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 2, 2011

Friday, December 2 saw the final day of debate in Parliament on the Cons’ omnibus crime bill. And for at least a moment, the proceedings took a perhaps surprising turn.

The Big Issue

As debate wound down on C-10, Irene Mathyssen questioned why the Cons insisted on delaying the passage of greater sentences for child . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 2, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 1, 2011

In the midst of a week of acrimonious debate over both the substance of the Cons’ dumb-on-crime legislation and the government’s procedural maneuvers to prevent even improvements which it recognized as necessary, December 1 served as a comparative beacon of cooperation (as noted specifically by Don Davies).

The Big Issue

That’s because the government . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: December 1, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 30, 2011

After the previous day’s debacle in which government-sponsored amendments to the Cons’ dumb-on-crime bill were ruled out of order, one might have expected at least some acknowledgment of fallibility on the part of the Harper Cons.

The Big Issue

But Wednesday, November 30 saw nothing of the sort, even when the Cons were questioned . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 30, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 29, 2011

Tuesday, November 29 saw debate at third reading on the Cons’ omnibus crime bill. And with even some Cons starting to recognize the desperate need for amendments, the government’s obstinate refusal to allow for any real consideration of the bill stood out all the more.

The Big Issue

At the start of debate, Andrew Scheer . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 29, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 28, 2011

Monday, November 28 saw the final day of debate in the House of Commons on the Cons’ legislation to trash the single-desk Canadian Wheat Board. And not surprisingly, the result was a particularly focused set of concerns about the bill – though those were waved aside yet again.

The Big Issue

The line of the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 28, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.

– Susan Delacourt wonders whether the Cons plan to launch an attack on the environmental movement to match the schism which helped the Libs and the Bloc to divide up the Quebec political pie over sovereignty. But it’s worth keeping in mind that even with multiple parties eager to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 21, 2011

Monday, November 21 featured the final day of debate on the Harper Cons’ omnibus budget bill.

The Big Issue

Not surprisingly, the final day of debate on budget legislation gave rise to plenty of clash, with Peter Julian offering up the best summary of the contrasting positions: What the Conservatives are saying is that . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 21, 2011

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 17, 2011

Thursday, November 17 saw a Liberal opposition day turned into a discussion about the sad state of water supplies to Canada’s First Nations. But while all parties were able to support the motion, there was plenty of room for contrast as to who was most interested in dealing with the desperate need for improvement.

The . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: November 17, 2011