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Wise Law Blog: LawFact of the Day: Employment Law

Here is your daily LawFact from Wise Law for Tuesday October 25, 2016. Today we are talking about Employment Law. A video posted by Wise Law Office (@wiselaw) on Oct 25, 2016 at 6:43am PDT

Did you know that your Employer has a duty to accommodate your disability up until a point of undue hardship?An . . . → Read More: Wise Law Blog: LawFact of the Day: Employment Law

Things Are Good: An Ad Campaign That Sells More Than a Product

It can be hard navigating the world as a person with a disability, be it mental or physical, and it can be even harder to make friends. Unfortunately there is a lot of social stigma around people who look different, fortunately in the UK a company launched an ad campaign to sell chocolate and social […]

The post An Ad Campaign That Sells More Than a Product appeared first on Things Are Good.

. . . → Read More: Things Are Good: An Ad Campaign That Sells More Than a Product

Cowichan Conversations: This Mother Spoke Up When Her Son Was The Only One Not Invite To A Birthday Party

This is a busy time of year and I have not posted much on my blog lately, but this piece posted on ‘Buzzfeed’ jumped out at me and I decided to post it. I hope Read more… . . . → Read More: Cowichan Conversations: This Mother Spoke Up When Her Son Was The Only One Not Invite To A Birthday Party

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Helping Someone Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits

A Guest Post by Donna FitzgeraldAs a caregiver, it’s likely you’ve helped to fill out and assisted with mountains of important paperwork. If you are caring for a loved one or have recently become employed to help care for someone with a debilitatin… . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Helping Someone Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Helping Someone Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits

A Guest Post by Donna Fitzgerald

As a caregiver, it’s likely you’ve helped to fill out and assisted with mountains of important paperwork. If you are caring for a loved one or have recently become employed to help care for someone with a debilitating medical condition, there’s a good chance that he or she is no longer able to work due to his or her health.

When an individual is diagnosed with a mental or physical health condition that is expected to last for at least a year and interferes with his or her ability to work, he or she may be eligible to receive Social Security benefits (SSD) and as a caregiver, it may be part of your job to help him or her apply for benefits. Here are some things you should know about SSD benefits and some helpful tips when helping file:

Some Things to Know Before Applying

Although millions of Americans apply for SSD benefits every year, many are unaware that the process can be lengthy and often times complicated. Anyone who may be eligible to receive benefits should apply as soon as possible as the Social Security Administration (SSA) reports that a qualifying individual can not receive benefits until the sixth full month of a disability. Additionally, it may take up to a couple of months to hear back from SSA and whether or not an individual is deemed eligible to receive benefits. Finally (and unfortunately), about two thirds of first time applicants are denied, which is important to keep in mind. However, applicants have the opportunity to (and should) appeal their denial, but only have about two months to do so, therefore it’s important to be organized.

Organizing and Preparation

While there’s never a guarantee that an applicant will receive SSD benefits upon his or her first try, one of the best ways to be deemed eligible is by submitting accurate and detailed informationabout medical or employment history. As a caregiver, who most likely attends important medical appointments with the individual seeking SSD benefits, it’s a good idea to take detailed notes and fill in any gaps by asking questions that aren’t being asked or answered, but appear to be pertinent information for the SSD application.

Helping with the Application Process

Once you have helped to organize and gather all the important and relevant information, such as the residual functional capacity form, you can assist with the online application process. It’s important to remember that even if you are the preparer (and you may have to answer some questions about yourself) that the applicant signs his or her name. Before you submit the application, make sure it has been reviewed carefully and that no information is left blank or unfinished. Additionally, make copies of all information you send to SSA and take careful and detailed notes of any conversations that took place with the SSA during the application process.

If, at any point in the application process, things become confusing or you feel like it’s beyond your ability to assist, you can help your applicant set up an appointment with someone at SSA or even consult with a lawyer who specializes in SSD benefits.

 

. . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Helping Someone Apply for Social Security Disability Benefits

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: ‘SETTLING FOR’ – THAT’S WHAT CAREGIVERS DO

settling for, to be satisfied with:to settle for less.I had a dream and it was to become an actor.  I studied performance at university and went on to work in professional theatre as an actor, director and t… . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: ‘SETTLING FOR’ – THAT’S WHAT CAREGIVERS DO

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Parents of Kids With Disabilities Don’t Get Sick, Right?

This morning, there is a medical appointment in my diary.  It’s not a specialist clinic for our son Nicholas; it’s for me.  I’m going to review my spinal xrays with our GP.  I’ve abused my spine by lifting Nicholas throughout his life and Natalie when she was small. Now, I have degenerative disc disease . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Parents of Kids With Disabilities Don’t Get Sick, Right?

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: How To Be A Resilient Caregiver – Especially When Change Hits Hard

Resilience is a word that’s thrown around a lot these days.  Everyone needs it and everyone wants it, especially people giving or receiving care.   And the truth is we all need resilience the most at times of big life changes or transitions.  We mine our reserves of strength and optimism when our children with disabilities . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: How To Be A Resilient Caregiver – Especially When Change Hits Hard

wmtc: wheelchair rugby finals, parapan am games 2015

The 2015 Pan Am Games and Parapan Am Games were held in Toronto and the GTA this summer. Although I regard these events as a ridiculous waste of money, a very bad deal for residents of the host cities, there was one very bright upside for me: the opportunity to see some disability sports, nearby . . . → Read More: wmtc: wheelchair rugby finals, parapan am games 2015

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: WHAT IS A SUPPORT NETWORK AND WHAT WILL IT DO FOR ME?

I wrote this for an audience of adults with disabilities who want to get started using a tech tool to coordinate the help of friends and family in a circle of care.  But the model works for seniors too, as well as anyone who requires some assistance to get through a life challenge.   . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: WHAT IS A SUPPORT NETWORK AND WHAT WILL IT DO FOR ME?

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: National Community Care Insurance: What’s New in Canada

According to the 2014 Global Age Watch Index, Norway is the best country to be a senior citizen or person with disabilities.  Apart from Japan (9), all the top 10 countries are again in Western Europe, North America and Australasia. Norway shifted health care resources from hospitals to home and they have a huge financial, . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: National Community Care Insurance: What’s New in Canada

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: The Worth of Vulnerability

Marilynne Robinson is a great American novelist and essayist who mines contemporary society for meaning.  Her themes are expansive and biblical in their proportions.  This what she said in a New York Times Magazine interview recently:

“People,” Robinson said, pausing before she defined that familiar word in original terms: “Brilliant creatures, who at a very high . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: The Worth of Vulnerability

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: A Dream Come True: How One Community is Supporting its Citizens with Disabilities from Cradle to Grave

Until very recently, I have never met a parent of a child with disabilities who didn’t worry about the future.  “What will happen to my child after I die?  Where will my child live? Who will love my child and keep him safe?”  These are the anxieties that make restful sleep impossible for ageing parents. . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: A Dream Come True: How One Community is Supporting its Citizens with Disabilities from Cradle to Grave

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: How Can Yoga Help Dementia Patients (and Their Caregivers)?

How Can Yoga Help Dementia Patients? by Camille Leavold

Yoga is a popular form of exercise that has a variety of health benefits, which have gained attention from the general public and medical professionals alike. Benefits of yoga include improved strength, flexibility and posture, improvement in balance, a reduction in aches and pains and an . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: How Can Yoga Help Dementia Patients (and Their Caregivers)?

wmtc: things i heard at the library: an occasional series: #14

One of our regular Readers’ Den customers approached me with her usual long list of movies. She researches movies online, prints out lists, and comes to the desk to see what we have in our collection. Anything we have, we place on hold for her. She’s a great customer, in terms of library use. She . . . → Read More: wmtc: things i heard at the library: an occasional series: #14

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: An Interview With Me About Caregiving and Writing About Family Life & Ideas

Recently, I gave an interview to Kris Bone, a writer with the Puritan Magazine (a Canadian literary journal).  Here’s his article about my book, “The Four Walls of My Freedom: Lessons I’ve Learned From a Life of Caregiving” (House of Anansi Press, 2014).  My book is available everywhere in Canada and for pre-order in . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: An Interview With Me About Caregiving and Writing About Family Life & Ideas

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Blog Challenge Week One: My Connection to Disability

This summer, I’m participating in a blog hop.  The first topic of discussion is ‘My Connection to Disability’.

It was 1972 and I was seventeen.  I remember it was hot and humid on the day that the loudspeaker crackled to life and called my name, telling me to go to the office immediately.  I remember . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Blog Challenge Week One: My Connection to Disability

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Innovating for Caregivers at The SIX Vancouver Summer School

I’m on a plane now, reading over the notes I’ve made from the last four days.  I’ve just come from a week of listening, sharing and thinking about how society can be shaped and shifted to support family caregivers.  I was thinking too, about how care is at the heart of social change. The SIX . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM A Blog by Donna Thomson: Innovating for Caregivers at The SIX Vancouver Summer School

wmtc: not a funny story: ned vizzini, youth fiction, and suicide

It’s so hard to talk when you want to kill yourself.

That’s the first line of Ned Vizzini’s excellent 2006 youth novel, It’s Kind of a Funny Story. By the time I read the book this year, the author was already dead. Vizzini committed suicide last December; he was only 32 years old.

Those . . . → Read More: wmtc: not a funny story: ned vizzini, youth fiction, and suicide

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM - A Blog by Donna Thomson: Could Gilberto Powell Have Been Your Son, Mister President?

Nearly every day I see stories in the media of people with disabilities being abused. (For example, the case of Ethan Saylor, the young man with Down Syndrome who was killed by police when he went to the cinema).   But I normally don’t blog about them because I am not a rights activist – . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM – A Blog by Donna Thomson: Could Gilberto Powell Have Been Your Son, Mister President?

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM - A Blog by Donna Thomson: The Meaning of Friendship

Some friends are for life.  Some friends stick with you through thick and thin.  Friendship is a really, really big deal for everyone, but especially for our loved ones with disabilities or age-related vulnerability.   It may be that someone with a cognitive impairment cannot carry on a conversation, let alone forge and maintain friendly . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM – A Blog by Donna Thomson: The Meaning of Friendship

wmtc: what i’m reading: the fault in our stars, a truly great novel for youth and not-youth

I am in the middle of reading The Fault In Our Stars by John Green, a book almost too painful to read but impossible to put down. It’s achingly funny, profoundly insightful, and utterly heartbreaking, all at the same time. The Fault In Our Stars is supposedly a youth novel, but please don’t let that . . . → Read More: wmtc: what i’m reading: the fault in our stars, a truly great novel for youth and not-youth

wmtc: wmtc rebooted

I was in the middle of writing a post about my plan to get back into an exercise routine… when I broke my foot. Doing almost nothing. Walking along in the mall, on my way to get my hair cut and then go to work, my ankle turned over sharply. I was horrified, thinking . . . → Read More: wmtc: wmtc rebooted

Melissa Fong: Deafness, speech and the Performance of Gender

Deafness, speech and the Performance of Gender This weekend I had the privilege of participating in a conference on Disability and Ableism at Ryerson University. Let me just say first that it is an incredible feeling to be among people fluent in American Sign Language (ASL). To see them speak with gesture in silence can . . . → Read More: Melissa Fong: Deafness, speech and the Performance of Gender

wmtc: marxism 2012 program notes: from each according to their ability: the role of socialists in disability movement

This is the final post of my notes from the 2012 Marxism Conference. This was the first Marxism conference to include a talk on disability, an exciting development full of potential. I wanted to blog about it in great detail. A friend was recording the talk, so I stopped taking detailed notes… and then the . . . → Read More: wmtc: marxism 2012 program notes: from each according to their ability: the role of socialists in disability movement