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Accidental Deliberations: On clear oversight

Shorter Chuck Strahl: I can’t see why a secret police service should be overseen by anybody other than the MPs who are willing to break their own rules to inflict it on the public in the first place.

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Janine Berg writes about the need for strong public policy to counter the trend of growing inequality. And Gillian White traces the ever-increasing divergence between worker productivity and wages in an interview with Jan Rivkin: White: Some say that the decrease of collective bargaining has played a role in creating the gap, how true do you think that is?

Rivkin: There are a number of causes, one is the underlying shift in technology and globalization. Another is systematic underinvestment in the commons, which is a set of shared resources that every business needs (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s Police State Anti-terrorism Bill C-51 “Dangerous”: 100+ Academics

More than 100 academics sign letter telling Canadian MPs that Harper’s proposed anti-terrorism legislation, Bill C-51, would allow CSIS to violate Canadians’ privacy rights.

The post Harper’s Police State Anti-terrorism Bill C-51 “Dangerous”: 100+ Academics appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Burning question

What exactly do we expect CSIS to do with a possible data dump of every piece of information held by every federal government agency when at last notice, it was struggling to find the capacity to check e-mails for malware?

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, condensing this post on the risks of allowing CSIS to self-assess the scope of Canadians’ Charter rights under C-51.

For further reading…- Again, the go-to source for analysis of C-51 is Craig Forcese and Kent Roach’s site here. – Clayton Ruby and Nader Hasan’s analysis is here.- John Mueller and Mark Stewart duly reject the attempt to invent some existential terrorist threat. – Dale Smith muses about the Cons’ rush to ram C-51 through without analysis here. PressProgress challenges the conventional wisdom as to the supposed popularity of the bill here. And the Star appeals for (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: The Pony Express Government

CSE has undertaken a domestic spy operation that is illegal in Canada, because it’s spying on communication of Canadian citizens. CSE is supposed to only spy on foreigners, and the Commissioner overseeing the signals intelligence agency is supposed to put a stop to any overstepping of that mandate. Something clearly has gone awry in a grave way.

PONY EXPRESS should not exist in Canada nor should every (paper) letter mailed by Canadians be photographed, as the US is doing. Claiming the mandate CSE has to protect government computers overrides its restriction on conducting a mass surveillance operation of Canadians’ (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: C-51 Being Pushed by “Fascist” language

A former Mountie and CSIS operative thinks Harper’s so called anti-terrorism bill is scary and unnecessary.

Mr. Lavigne, 55, left government in 1999, but follows intelligence news closely.

He spent years tracking dangerous radicals without the powers the government wants to give to CSIS.

“I find it a little convenient that in the past few years that these radicalized people are the biggest threat to ever hit us,” he said. “There are more people dying because of drunk drivers or because of gang violence.”

(-link added by me)

Mr. Lavigne said the prime minister’s advisers must tell him that (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports on the work done by the Broadbent Institute and Mariana Mazzucato to highlight the importance of publicly-funded innovation: According to a 2014 report by the International Monetary Fund, Canadian companies have been accumulating “dead money” at a faster rate than any other G7 country, rather than reinvesting profit into things like human capital or research capacity — suggesting that the rewards of innovative success are being captured by an increasingly narrow sliver of society, even when public money may well have been an early catalyst for achievement.  But in (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On extended intrusions

There’s been plenty of discussion as to the similarities between the Cons’ terror bill and Pierre Trudeau’s 1970 invocation of the War Measures Act. And it’s certainly worth reminding ourselves that even in the face of an identifiable security concern, the impulse to attack civil rights tends to prove wrong upon reflection.

But there’s a key difference between the C-51 debate and Trudeau’s invocation of the War Measures Act – and it’s one which makes the present-day Cons and Libs look even worse than their predecessors.

Keep in mind that the War Measures Act was aimed at providing extreme but (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Burning question

C-51, the Cons’ terror bill, allows CSIS to covertly intrude on personal freedoms in two obvious ways.

First, it enables CSIS effectively unfettered authority – without a warrant – to engage in any action which is not contrary to the Charter or other Canadian law, and which does not: (a) cause, intentionally or by criminal negligence, death or bodily harm to an individual; (b) wilfully attempt in any manner to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice; or (c) violate the sexual integrity of an individual. 

Second, it enables CSIS – with a warrant – to violate (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: “Anti-Petroleum” RCMP Explodes Gasoline In Their Cars’ Engines

RCMP called ‘anti-petroleum’ critics (aka anyone concerned about climate change) a potential security threat http://t.co/sollGvyhdB #cdnpoli

— Keith Stewart (@climatekeith) February 18, 2015

The RCMP have displayed Climate Change Denial symptoms. This is bad for Canada, because if the police tasked with interfering in climate change related activism do not understand the science that drives the determined actions of peaceful activists, then they’re more likely to act against protesters without a measure of human sympathy.

@climatekeith @JohnKleinRegina Like these "dangerous" people:) pic.twitter.com/wZ71TpEu2n

— margaret resin (@margaretresin) February 18, 2015

Remember that RCMP bombed an oil installation just (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: Bill C-51–Trudeau Liberals and Mulcair New Democrats Put Party First-Canada Second

Richard Hub Hughes-Political Blogger

I am a life long New Democrat and I am appalled at the ‘weak as water’ positioning that the Thomas Mulcair led NDP have offered in regard to the Harper anti terror Bill C 51, a bill that will, if passed, turn Canada into a CSIS Police State.

Mulcair has said he opposes Bill C 51, but so far lacks the passion and commitment necessary to have his concerns registered as significant.

Justin Trudeau just choked and offered his support right from the beginning.

PM Steve Harper salutes Canada

If Mulcair and Trudeau not going to go to (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: Ewart-Dangerous new powers for federal government? – Part 1

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

Most Canadians have heard something about the new so called ‘Anti Terror’ legislation Bill C 51 but what we have failed to hear is opposition political leaders, excepting Elizabeth May, speaking up and effectively challenging this unprecedented attack on the rights and freedoms of Canadians.

Elizabeth May rings the bell over Bill C 51

Green Party leader Elizabeth May has staked out clear and concise opposition and stood up in parliament saying so in the clearest of language.

Mulcair and Trudeau have muttered a bit, Trudeau buying the package and Mulcair meekly pointing out a few concerns hear (Read more…)

Cowichan Conversations: Even the Globe and Mail is Alarmed Over Harper’s Surveillance-Anti Terror Bill C-51

Richard Hughes-Political Blogger

The Liberal and NDP response to PM Stephen Harper’s far reaching attempt to decimate Canada’s civil rights and privacy laws left a lot to be desired.

Justin Trudeau rolled over in support and showed us up close that he has a long way to go before he is ready to assume the role of Prime Minister.

Thomas Mulcair- is opposed to Harper’s anti terror bill

Thomas Mulcair’s early responses , although in opposition to the so called anti terror bill, was pretty tame, wishy washy, understated.

Mulcair did not support the bill but the severity of Bill C 51’s deserved, demanded a (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Joe Gunn reminds us that ignoring the issue of poverty won’t make it go away. And Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports on a national campaign demanding a plan to deal with poverty at the federal level.

- Roderick Benns discusses the prospect of a guaranteed annual income with Wayne Simpson. And Whitney Mallett is the latest to look in depth at how the successful Mincome basic income plan might spread much further: Critics of basic income guarantees have insisted that giving the poor money would disincentivize them to work, and point to studies that show ​a (Read more…)

Susan on the Soapbox: Anatomy of a Homicide Investigation

Just as Ms Soapbox was fretting over Prime Minister Harper’s decision to appoint former CSIS director Richard Fadden to the newly created post of National Security Advisor she received an invitation from Assentio Mentium.

Assentio Mentium is a program offered by the U of C law school to engage lawyers, alumni, academics, business people and students on current legal issues.

This month’s offering? Anatomy of a Homicide Investigation. At last! A chance to pull back the curtain and find out what homicide investigations are really like.

Alain Hepner QC

Detective Matt Demarino, a seasoned and highly entertaining investigator, kicked things (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Harper’s new terror laws must respect Canadians’ fundamental rights: watchdogs

Canada’s provincial and federal privacy commissioners are warning the Harper government against using the recent shootings in Ottawa and Quebec as a pretext to attack Canadians’ fundamental rights.

The post Harper’s new terror laws must respect Canadians’ fundamental rights: watchdogs appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

The Disaffected Lib: RCMP + CSIS – Add Water and Stir. Voila, the Stasi Lives Again

They were East Germany’s dreaded secret police.   They spied on ordinary East Germans, tapped their phones, intercepted their mail, assessed their ‘reliability’, used informants, kept dossiers on persons of interest and ordinary citizens alike.  

The hated Stasi fell with the Berlin Wall but they live on – in today’s RCMP, the Royal Conservative Mounted Police, Harper’s personal security apparatus. Today the RCMP, in conjunction with our official spy agency, CSIS, and the Canadian Border Service Agency, operate a domestic spying network called the Integrated National Security Enforcement Team, INSET.

And just whose security is INSET enforcing? Yours? (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: RCMP Warning Of Oil and Gas Attacks

.@DavidMcLA @mikedesouza Remember, the RCMP are experts at critical energy infrastructure terrorism. http://t.co/6MhPHIS97R #Oil

— Saskboy K. (@saskboy) September 15, 2014

The RCMP would know.

@DavidMcLA does it tie into this? http://t.co/dfZpU7AxgT

— Mike De Souza (@mikedesouza) September 15, 2014

OpenMedia.ca: Digital Journal: What will it take for CSEC spying to spark more outrage?

In this hard-hitting op-ed, George Arthur asks what it will take for Canadians to get answers about out-of-control spy agency CSEC.

Article by George Arthur for the Digital Journal

This is the question I am left with as I consider what it will take for Canadians to demand answers about the true operations of the spy agency that is set to move into the most expensive governmental building in the nation’s history.

According to the careers page for Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), “2014 promises to be an exciting year.” The organization is scheduled to move into “a newly (Read more…)

OpenMedia.ca: The Day We Fight Back

Highlight Image: 

Highlight Link:  https://openmedia.ca/stand

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: That Old Joke

How can you tell a spy is lying to Parliament? Their lips are moving. Or at least I’d assume they were moving while he was telling us that they didn’t conduct mass spying on Canadians, while also defending illegal mass “meta-data” spying on us.

MT @CBCAlerts "#CSIS says they don't have authority to engage in 'mass surveillance' of Canadians" — That's what makes it a crime. #Snowden— John Klein (@JohnKleinRegina) February 03, 2014

UPDATED: PM adviser defends metadata collection by spy agency. Watch live + follow our blog fw.to/woiZpwC #cdnpoli #hw #csec #csis— CBC Politics (Read more…)

A BCer in Toronto: Being a good guy doesn’t excuse Chuck Strahl’s lack of judgment

I don’t know Chuck Strahl, but I’ve always thought he seemed like a pretty good guy, all in all. He certainly has won many friends on all sides of the political fence and in the pundit class, and they were quick to shower him with praise last week when he resigned as head of the federal body that oversees Canada’s spy agency.  They weren’t acting as real friends, though, because real friends tell each other the truth, and there was nothing remotely “ethical” or resembling “the right thing” in the way Strahl handled himself in this affair. Strahl, a (Read more…)

Peace, order and good government, eh?: There’ll be no help from Mary Dawson

Ethics Commissioner Distances Herself From Strahl Complaints

Mary Dawson, the Federal Conflict of Interest and Ethics Commissioner released a statement today distancing herself from recent complaints filed as a result of SIRC Chair Chuck Strahl engaging in lobbying activities for Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines while serving in his appointed function as Canada’s Spy Watchdog.

Commissioner Dawson states: “While we may advise caution in certain circumstances, it is the public office holder’s responsibility to determine how to manage his or her private affairs in a way that does not give rise to perceptions of unethical behaviour, and risk bringing the institution (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Jim Stanford writes about the myth of a labour shortage in Canada: In this context of chronic un- and under-employment, it is jarring that so many employers, business lobbyists, and politicians continue to complain about a supposed shortage of available, willing, and adequately skilled workers. Employers routinely claim they can’t find qualified Canadians to perform even relatively straightforward jobs. They can’t entice Canadians to move from depressed regions, to areas with jobs. They can’t elicit desired levels of effort, discipline and loyalty.

According to this worldview, the biggest challenge facing our labour market (Read more…)