Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jesse Ferreras reports that Canada’s supposed job growth has included almost nothing but part-time and precarious work. And Louis-Philippe Rochon points out how the influence of the financial sector has led to economic choices which serve nobody else’s interests: What makes governments hesitate to pursue policies they ...

We Pivot: 2wice More Justin Trudeau Goes Anti-Feminist

It’s great that Trudeau wants to give Liberia $12 million to improve the condition of women, but in Canada he’s undermining the economic security of Canadian women and others, including a specific betrayal of a campaign promise. But as we … [Read more]

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP).  And over at the Behind the Numbers web site, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Ten things to know about the CPP debate.” The blog post’s other co-authors are Allan Moscovitch and Richard Lochead. Points raised in the blog ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: How do you solve a problem like precarious work?

Finance Minister Bill Morneau has taken quite a bit of heat for his tone deaf comments about the reality of precarious work, specifically saying that we should just “get used to job churn”. But his policy prescription, an improved social safety net, is a quite valid part of the solution. But must we accept that ‘the precarious will always ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – John Quiggin argues that public services and corporate control don’t mix – no matter how desperately the people seeking to exploit public money try to pretend otherwise: Market-oriented reforms, particularly in the provision of human services like health, education and public safety, have begun with a working ...

The Progressive Economics Forum: Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors

Over at the Behind the Numbers web site, Allan Moscovitch, David Macdonald and I have a blog post titled “Ten Things to Know About Federal Income Support for Low-Income Seniors in Canada.” The blog post argues—among other things—that if the age of eligibility for Old Age Security were to move from 65 to 67, the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Dani Rodrik comments on the need for a far more clear set of policy prescriptions for left-wing political parties to present as an alternative to laissez-faire corporate domination, while noting there’s no lack of source material worth considering: The good news is that the intellectual vacuum on ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jeff Guo reports on Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson’s research showing how the U.S. went from standing out internationally for its relatively equal distribution of wealth, to being equally exceptional in its inequality: In the Revolutionary era, inequality in America was dramatically lower than it was in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Jeremy Smith argues that the Brexit vote result should serve as a compelling reminder of the dangers of neoliberalism. John Hood focuses on inequality in particular as a driving force behind the willingness of voters to leave the European Union, while Mike Carter points out the connection between ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Neil Irwin writes about the White House Council of Economic Advisers’ study of employment policy which found that superior protections for workers (rather than the undermining of employment standards in the name of “flexibility”) correlate to improved workforce participation. – MaxSpeak discusses the value of universal social ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Andrew Leach’s after-the-fact addendum to his review of Alberta’s climate change policy offers an important reminder as to the costs of inaction on climate change – and the message is one which applies equally to other jurisdictions which are seen as climate laggards: Our emissions do not simply ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Rick Salutin argues that we need to say no to any more trade agreements designed to privilege corporations at the expense of the public. Will Martin reports on the IMF’s long-overdue recognition of the failures of neoliberalism, while pointing out that there’s still a long way to go ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Greg Jericho is the latest to weigh in on the false promises of neoliberalism: An article in the IMF’s latest issue of is journal Finance and Development notes that “instead of delivering growth, some neoliberal policies have increased inequality” and jeopardised “durable” growth. The authors note that ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Murray Dobbin is hopeful that we may be seeing corporate globalization based on unquestioned neoliberal ideology come to an end: There is no definitive way to identify when an ideology begins to lose its grip on the public discourse but could this clear resistance (it is even more ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

This and that for your weekend reading. – Sarah Anderson, Marc Bayard, John Cavanagh, Chuck Collins, Josh Hoxie and Sam Pizzigati offer an outline as to how to fight back against growing inequality: § We need to see inequality as a deep systemic problem. Piecemeal interventions have not helped slow or reverse the pace of wealth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Jan-Emmanuel De Neve and Nick Powdthavee discuss how the rise of an exclusive class of the rich increases stress and decreases well-being for everybody else. Using data from the World Top Incomes Database and the Gallup World Poll, we compared the share of taxable income held by ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Thomas Piketty writes that regardless of the end result, Bernie Sanders’ presidential campaign may mark the start of a fundamental change in U.S. politics: Sanders’ success today shows that much of America is tired of rising inequality and these so-called political changes, and intends to revive both a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – John O’Farrell argues that a basic income provides a needed starting point for innovation and entrepreneurship by people who don’t enjoy the advantage of inherited wealth: But in fact it is the current situation that prevents initiative and holds back entrepreneurs. Anyone who ever invented or created anything ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading. – Ian Welsh summarizes why inequality is intrinsically problematic: Even where people’s needs are met, the more unequal a society the more unhealthy everyone is and the more unhappy they are. Those who feel lower on the totem pole also perform worse than they otherwise would.  Remove the feeling ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on this post about Brad Wall’s sad attempt to beg Justin Trudeau for federal money to make up for his own mismanagement. For further reading…– Once again, Wall’s call for a bailout was here. And his previous decision to drop any attempt at a sound equalization system at Stephen Harper’s request can be ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Desmond Cole rightly slams the stinginess of Ontario’s government in taking support away from parents based on child support which isn’t actually received. And Karl Nerenberg laments Bill Morneau’s decision to let the Scrooges among Canada’s finance ministers dictate the future of the Canada Pension Plan. – ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Ronald Inglehart discusses the political roots of inequality – and the likelihood that the forces that have allowed it to fester for decades will eventually be reversed: New political alignments, in short, might once again readjust the balance of power between elites and masses in the developed world, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – John Quiggin examines – and refutes – a few key complaints about fairer taxes on the wealthy. But Kathryn May reports that the Cons are eager to use public resources to investigate and punish public servants who have exposed the problems with the Canada Revenue Agency, rather than ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Kate McInturff puts forward some big long-term goals which deserve to be discussed as we elect our next federal government. And Leah McLaren discusses how a lack of child care affects every Canadian: The single most shocking thing to me about becoming a mother was the lack of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Paul Krugman theorizes that our recent pattern of economic instability can be traced to a glut of accumulated wealth chasing too few viable investments: On the surface, we seem to have had a remarkable run of bad luck. First there was the housing bust, and the banking crisis ...