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Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

- Joseph Heath discusses how the Volkswagen emission cheating scandal fits into a particular type of corporate culture: (W)hen the Deepwater Horizon tragedy occurred, or now the VW scandal, it was hardly surprising to people who follow these things. Certain industries essentially harbour and reproducing deviant subcultures. This is one of the reasons that much of the best work on white collar crime has been inspired by, and draws upon, work in juvenile delinquency. Whereas delinquents tend to exist in subcultures that reproduce deviant attitudes toward authority, many corporations reproduce subcultures that promote organized resistance (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Paul Weinberg discusses the need to focus on inequality in Canada’s federal election, while Scott Deveau and Jeremy Van Loon take note of the fact that increased tax revenue is on the table. The Star’s editorial board weighs in on the NDP’s sound and progressive fiscal plan. And Matthew Yglesias includes the rise of the NDP as part of the growth of a new, international progressive movement.

- Rank and File interviews Michael Butler about the privatization of health care in Saskatchewan, as well as the role of the federal government in (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Michal Rozworski calls for the election to include far more discussion as to who benefits from our economy as it’s designed, and who gets left behind. Michael Wilson examines how Canada’s economy has become far less equal over the past few decades. And Michelle Zilio talks to Munir Sheikh about the “made in Canada recession” under the Harper Cons, as a rare divergence between Canada and the rest of the world is seeing us headed in the wrong direction even as the U.S. and other developed countries do relatively well.

- Joanna (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

Stephen Harper plays chess: Sources say Conservative planners did factor in testimony by Wright and Harper’s former legal counsel Perrin. Once the testimony was over, they calculated, the sting would fade, and those voters who were inclined to believe Harper’s version would continue to do so. Those who never believed him would never vote for him anyway.

Just one problem with his strategy: The vast majority of Canadians do not believe Stephen Harper is telling the truth about the Mike Duffy Senate expenses scandal, a new poll has found. Some 56 per cent of respondents do not think (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- Althia Raj, Karl Nerenberg, Tim Harper, Jennifer Ditchburn and Kristy Kirkup, Lee Berthiaume and Jason Fekete, PressProgress and CTV News all point out some of the more noteworthy aspects of Nigel Wright’s testimony in Mike Duffy’s trial (along with the large amount of material brought to light as a result). Frank Koller observes that we should be insulted by Wright’s belief that full cover-ups can be bought, while Sandy Garossino highlights how quickly Wright’s talking points fell apart once they were subject to meaningful scrutiny. The Star, (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: By invitation only

Yes, Paul McLeod’s report that Stephen Harper will go through a three-month election period without meeting a single person who hasn’t been previously vetted by partisan operatives is pretty much the logical extension of the Harper Cons’ attitude toward the public. But it’s worth offering a reminder how that relates to the flood of propaganda going in the other direction.

Any place in Stephen Harper’s campaign – or any consideration by his government – is by invitation only.

The few people who receive personal invitations due to their perceived political value – the Carsons and Duffys, Porters and Del Mastros (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Jeffrey Sachs writes about the need to shape a more moral, less exploitative economy. So needless to say, the Cons are instead working on promoting corruption.

- Mark Weisbrot discusses how the Troika’s attempt to impose continued austerity on Greece in the face of public resistance can’t be seen as much more than an attempt at coercive regime change. And John Nichols reports on just a few of the voices rightly lauding the refusal of Greece’s electorate to go along with that plan.

- Scott Eric Kaufman talks to Erik Loomis about (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Mostly competent government

To nobody’s surprise, Stephen Harper’s brand of economic management means election slush funds throwing tens of millions of dollars away for no public benefit.

And it also means public servants going unpaid due to the failure of the Cons’ supposed attempts to make government more efficient.

Do we dare take the risk of having another, more responsible party in charge of our public purse?

The Canadian Progressive: Senate expenses scandal “the most Canadian of scandals”: John Oliver

For comedian John Oliver, the host of HBO’s Last Week Tonight, Canada’s Senate expenses scandal is “the most Canadian of scandals”.

The post Senate expenses scandal “the most Canadian of scandals”: John Oliver appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how the Senate’s failure to provide any second thought on C-51 may serve as the ultimate signal that it has nothing useful to offer Canadians.

For further reading…- PressProgress’ look at the Senate’s sad history is well worth a read. The CBC reports on the Auditor General’s findings about the widespread abuse of public money. And Ian Austen offers a U.S. perspective on what comes next for the Senate.- Meanwhile, Karl Nerenberg explains why abolition is well within reach if anybody is willing to take a leadership role in pursuing it without reopening other (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: CBC House Cleaning Claims the Vapid Evan

Evan Solomon was always a pathetic pseudo-journalist.

Ask an intriguing question, politician spins or lies or evades or trots out talking points, then Evan…what does he do? Move on. Nothing to see here.

Waste of air.

The world is better off with him off the air.

January 10, 2014 What Does Post-Corporate Media Look Like? (0) February 5, 2014 The Media Corruption Trifecta! (5) November 26, 2013 More CBC Privatization (2) February 25, 2012 Yas A., Kagan Goh and Carmen Aguirre: Monday at 6pm on COOP Radio (0)

LeDaro: Mike Duffy Saga

Harper sure knows how to appoint Senators, Pamela Wallin, Patrick Brazeau, and the notorious Mike Duffy. Harper campaigned against an appointed Senate, against privilege and corruption, in 2006, only to embrace it full on when he became Prime Minister. He appointed Mike Duffy, a so-called journalist who abused his position to gain the Prime Minister’s favour and get a Senate appointment. Duffy would promote stories favourable to the Prime Minister, even saying no one could question his integrity.

Duffy relished in a 2008 tape of then-Liberal leader Stéphane Dion stumbling, which was shown repeatedly even though the network had assured (Read more…)

Akaash Maharaj - Practical Idealism: Akaash Maharaj: Addressing the United Nations

Political corruption kills more people than war and famine combined. I addressed the United Nations on how the international community can and must act to bring kleptocrats to justice.

A Grumpy Hobbit: Holding Police Accountable and Knowing Your Legal Rights

Holding Police Accountable and Knowing Your Legal Rights So, with all the BS happening down in the USA with Police being out of control and cracking skulls every chance they get, the questions arises “Do we need to be worried about this here in Canada? What are our rights? What can we do to protect ourselves against the Police?”

Do We Need to be Worried About This Here in Canada? The sorry

A Grumpy Hobbit: Harpers and CPC Objection to Omar Khar Bail Release Just FAILED!!!

Harpers and CPC Objection to Omar Khadr’s Bail Release Just FAILED!!! The Harper Government and CPC/Government lawyers who oppose Omar Khadr bail release was based on one single objection, that his bail release would jeopardize USA/Canada relations and US/Canadian treaties. THAT’S IT! Not that Omar was at risk of fleeing, not that he was at risk of re-offending, not that Omar was going to

Accidental Deliberations: What you know in the PMO

Obviously, the revelation that Mike Duffy saw his job in the Senate as including a role as a publicly-funded lobbyist for the climate denial movement raises a whole new set of questions about the Cons’ misuse of public resources. And if, say Enbridge is being at all honest in its own public spin, Stephen Harper was well aware of what was going on: Duffy’s conversations with Enbridge officials [between January and June 2012] aren’t listed in the company’s lobbying registrations. However, in an email to CBC News, Enbridge’s vice-president of enterprise communications called those conversations “unsolicited.”

“Senator Duffy (Read more…)

The Canadian Progressive: Ex-Conservative Senator Wallin committed “breach of trust and fraud”: RCMP

The RCMP announced Monday that ex-Conservative Senator Pamela Wallin, a Harper appointee, “committed the offences of breach of trust and fraud.”

The post Ex-Conservative Senator Wallin committed “breach of trust and fraud”: RCMP appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Kate McInturff and David Macdonald address the need for an adult discussion about how federal policies affect Canadian families. And Kevin Campbell writes about the importance of child care as a social investment. 

- Vincenzo Bove and Georgios Efthyvoulou study how public policy is shaped by political budget cycles – with more popular social spending getting emphasized around election time, only to face a threat as soon as the vote is held. And Scott Clark and Peter DeVries identify a distinct increase in the smoke and mirrors being used by the Cons (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On corporate takeovers

CTV reports on the funnelling of money from SNC-Lavalin into the Cons’ coffers. And we shouldn’t be surprised to see that connection in light of the Cons’ attitude toward corporate wrongdoing.

But it’s especially worth noting what’s missing from the Cons’ denials of involvement: Elections Canada records reveal that 10 top SNC-Lavalin managers and their wives wrote personal cheques in 2009 to two federal Conservative riding associations that showed little chance of winning.

A total of $25,000 was funnelled to the ridings of Laurier-Sainte-Marie and Portneuf-Jacques-Cartier. Approximately $30,000 was then transferred out to Megantic-L’Erable, the riding of then-public works minister (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- A Gandalf Group poll finds (PDF) that Canadians have come to perceive and expect a disturbing level of self-serving action by our political leaders. And while Dale Smith is right to note that we’ve largely limited the most obvious forms of corruption, there’s still plenty of reason for concern that public policy is being driven by a few insiders and political cronies at the expense of the public.

- On that front, Gerald Caplan reminds us how the CRA is being used to silence only charities who promote social justice – while (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: The Big Easy – Easy On Rapists

There’s always been a seedy undercurrent to New Orleans – everything from street hustlers to corrupt politicians.  It’s part of the flavour of the place.

Now it turns out the Big Easy has been going easy on rapists thanks to a municipal detective squad that couldn’t care less.

… a city inspector general’s report claims five detectives failed to do substantial investigation of more than 1,000 cases of sex crimes and child abuse — with one detective being cited for stating a belief that simple rape should not be considered a crime.The US Justice Department previously investigated the scandal-plagued (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: A Government Corrupted

There’s no trace of hyperbole in denouncing Stephen Harper as the Great Corrupter.  He is corrupt and he corrupts whatever he touches whenever and however it suits him.

The proof is pretty much everywhere but a shining example is the National Energy Board.   Take it from Marc Elieson, an energy executive and former CEO of BC Hydro.

Marc Eliesen  …has quit his role as an intervenor in the federal review of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline and oil tanker expansion project, calling the National Energy Board “a truly captured regulator.” Eliesen has worked in the nation’s energy (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: Corrupt Spanish politics faces shock therapy from an angry electorate | Miguel-Anxo Murado | Comment is free | The Guardian

Corrupt Spanish politics faces shock therapy from an angry electorate | Miguel-Anxo Murado | Comment is free | The Guardian.


Being “between Pinto and Valdemoro” is an old Spanish saying that refers to being in trouble. Now with the number of politicians being investigated for corruption in Spain nearing 2,000, including the mayor of that very Valdemoro town of lore, you could say that the whole Spanish political class finds itself between Pinto and Valdemoro. And it’s not just in the size of the problem but its timing. Embezzlement of public funds is never received with enthusiasm but (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Cons’ presumption that any individual who breaches the social contract must be punished with a total lack of freedom – and their curious lack of any similar principle when it comes to corporate wrongdoing.

For further reading…- I’ve dealt with issues relating to mandatory minimum sentences plenty of times before, while the likes of Dan Gardner and John Moore have taken them on directly. But see examples of the Cons’ unduly strict individual sentencing being struck down here and here.  – Richard Blackwell reported on the SNC-Lavalin’s demand to be held above the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

- The Tyee’s recent series on important sources of inequality is well worth a read, as Emily Fister interviews Andrew Longhurst about precarious work and Sylvia Fuller about the role of motherhood.

- David Cole asks just how corrupt U.S. politics have become, while Frances O’Grady observes that U.K workers don’t believe for a second that their employer can’t afford to pay living wages. Robert Reich sees Detroit as a prime example of wealthy individuals shirking their responsibility to pay for the public goods they enjoy. And Joseph Stiglitz notes that gross (Read more…)