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Michal Rozworski: Uber and the Luddites

The fight against the sharing economy, and Uber in particular, can be disorienting. Opposition is often painted as techno-phobia. The good guys in this story are Uber and progress; on the other side are opponents afraid of flexibility and smartphones, kicking and screaming against a future already here. In many ways, this is like the […] . . . → Read More: Michal Rozworski: Uber and the Luddites

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Alex Himelfarb writes about the urgent need to reverse the vicious cycle of austerity. And Toby Sanger takes a look at the economic records of Canada’s political parties, and finds that the NDP ranks at the top of the class not only for balancing budgets, but also for . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

CuriosityCat: Welcome move by Mulcair closer to Liberal position on cooperation and electoral reform

Mulcair has shown a welcome willingness to work with a minority Liberal Party government post-October 19 so as to do two things: work together without the need for a formal coalition agreement between the LPC and NDP, and to establish a commission to examine the best alternatives to be presented to Canadians to replace the . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Welcome move by Mulcair closer to Liberal position on cooperation and electoral reform

CuriosityCat: Welcome move by Mulcair closer to Liberal position on cooperation and electoral reform

Mulcair has shown a welcome willingness to work with a minority Liberal Party government post-October 19 so as to do two things: work together without the need for a formal coalition agreement between the LPC and NDP, and to establish a commission to examine the best alternatives to be presented to Canadians to replace the first past the post system, not just the modified proportional representation system.
Here’s the reported willingness to support confidence votes (without a formal coalition government) if the Liberal Party gets the most votes as between the LPC and NDP, and Trudeau becomes prime minister of a minority government:
With the strong possibility of a minority Parliament resulting from the Oct. 19 vote, the NDP says in its platform document that it would work with other federalist parties through informal or appropriate stable arrangements to end Stephen Harpers lost decade.”
And here is the report of his willingness to appoint a commission to examine the best alternatives to be passed into law within a short space of time, so as to replace the archaic FPTP system (making this 2015 election the last one we will have under the FPTP system):
Included in their platform, called “Building the Canada of our Dreams,” is a plan to reform the political system and “make every vote count.” The NDP is promising that, if elected, it will introduce a system of voting based on mixed-member proportional representation. That would create a Parliament composed of MPs elected in larger ridings than currently exist, plus those nominated by parties based on the proportion of the vote they received during an election.

Although proportional representation has long been NDP policy, this is the first time the party has said it would create a task force made up of members of all parties that would decide the best model for this type of democracy – and that it would be done within the first mandate.
Kudos to Mulcair for letting the Canadian voters know ahead of time that he will work in a very practical way, once the Harper government is replaced (through a Harper resignation if the Tories get fewer seats than either the LPC or NDP, or through a vote of no confidence in a Harper minority’s first Throne Speech).
These two flexible proposals ensure that a minority LPC or NDP government will be able to function after October 20, and that we are definitely going to get meaningful electoral reform and other democratic improvements to our Parliament.
As Mulcair said, we have a lot of work to do to repair the lost opportunities of the Harper “lost decade”.

. . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Welcome move by Mulcair closer to Liberal position on cooperation and electoral reform

CuriosityCat: Coalition or no coalition? What will happen on October 20

Qualified support? OK

Polls show the Conservatives slipping, and the NDP and LPC in a dead heat for the role of replacement government, but neither of those two parties expected to gain a majority of seats in the House (170 seats). And this has given rise to intense debate about coalitions. Trudeau is right . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Coalition or no coalition? What will happen on October 20

CuriosityCat: Election 2015: Is the Liberal Party ready for October 20th?

Who will be our next PM? Probably Harper

We vote on October 19. It will be a cliffhanger, with final results only out early the next day. A minority government is possible, as the Poll Tracker shows with today’s results: The Poll Tracker’s polling average currently awards the Tories 29.3 per cent of the . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Election 2015: Is the Liberal Party ready for October 20th?

CuriosityCat: Forum poll: Harper in free fall and Mulcair headed for strong minority government

Forum tale of the seats

Tom Mulcair is headed towards becoming prime minister of a government with a hefty chunk of seats in Parliament, just shy of a majority, according to the latest Forum poll: A Forum Research poll conducted a few hours after Stephen Harper officially called the 2015 federal election on Sunday . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Forum poll: Harper in free fall and Mulcair headed for strong minority government

Accidental Deliberations: On end goals

We can fully expect Canada’s election campaign to feature plenty more talk about possible coalition outcomes – which are favoured by the public, and may represent the best way to ensure the Cons’ replacement if Stephen Harper again tries to cling to power. And as I’ve noted before, there remains little reason to take the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On end goals

CuriosityCat: Globe & Mail: 95% Chance Harper Government will be replaced in election

The mighty Globe & Mail has spoken, on this, the first day of our election campaign. The writ has been dropped, and the G&M has carried the golden election forecast down from the mountain top, and is displaying it for all to see. As of today, this is the entrails of the portent-indicating G&M chicken: . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Globe & Mail: 95% Chance Harper Government will be replaced in election

CuriosityCat: Election: EKOS poll – Seniors will return Harper to power as Prime Minister

A key statistic is not who favours what party before election day, but how many voters actually cast a vote on that day.  Seniors vote. Younger voters don’t vote in the same proportions. The latest EKOS poll explains why Stephen Harper will be Prime Minister on September 20, 2015, leading a minority government: Neither the . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Election: EKOS poll – Seniors will return Harper to power as Prime Minister

Accidental Deliberations: Trampled

Elizabeth May tells us that her idea of a grassroots movement is a finely manicured lawn carefully maintained to suit the aesthetic preferences of its owners: May said she didn’t want to thwart local efforts towards co-operation with other parties, but that she thinks she, Liberal Party Leader Justin Trudeau and NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Trampled

CuriosityCat: Election 2015 Seniors will determine who is Prime Minister of Canada come late October

Convergence

Here’s one interesting finding from the June 16 Forum poll: The NDP vote is characteristic of the youngest (43%), the least wealthy (39%) and the wealthiest (37%), in BC (30%) and among the best educated (43%). 

The Liberal vote is common to older voters (45 to 54 and 65+ – 31%), the wealthiest . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Election 2015 Seniors will determine who is Prime Minister of Canada come late October

CuriosityCat: Election 2015: Why Canadians will have a new government

Yes, Prime Minister …

Yesterday’s EKOS poll results released by Frank Graves have plenty of food for thought.

The poll results are worth detailed study by anyone trying to get a fix on what will happen in the coming election.

One thing right now, based on this poll snapshot, is that a minority . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Election 2015: Why Canadians will have a new government

Accidental Deliberations: Choosing the wrong side

Following up on this morning’s column, let’s note that there’s another area where the Libs are stubbornly sticking to a previous position whose underpinnings have been even more thoroughly destroyed.

The Libs have been at pains to at least offer the perception of changing their direction from nearly everything done by both Stephane Dion and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Choosing the wrong side

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Jay Baron Nicorvo discusses how the myth of U.S. meritocracy serves largely as a means of funneling profits toward the 1%. And Mary Hansen points out one way of fighting back against evolving forms of corporate power – being the development of new, cooperative alternatives to businesses designed . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On prospects for change

The latest round of discussion about the possibility of a coalition to offer something better than the Harper Cons seems to have taken an noteworthy turn. At this point, everybody but the Libs seems to have settled on the position that there’s no real obstacle to a coalition government – and the Libs’ spin machine . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On prospects for change

Writings of J. Todd Ring: New studies show generosity and cooperation are both natural and intelligent

A new study shows a mathematical proof that generosity leads to evolutionary success. Biologists offer a mathematically based explanation for why cooperation and generosity have evolved in nature [Credit: Web] “Ever since Darwin,” Plotkin said, “biologists have been puzzled about why there is so much apparent cooperation, and even flat-out generosity and altruism, in nature.” . . . → Read More: Writings of J. Todd Ring: New studies show generosity and cooperation are both natural and intelligent

Leftist Jab: Justin Trudeau’s Message to Elizabeth May: Not Running A Candidate in Labrador Is Patronizing

Why does the Green Party want to cooperate with the Liberals again?

Consider Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May who’s fought for progressives to cooperate in elections. To that effect, the Green Party has not fielded a candidate in the Labrador by-election as she explains in this statement:

The Green Party is committed to . . . → Read More: Leftist Jab: Justin Trudeau’s Message to Elizabeth May: Not Running A Candidate in Labrador Is Patronizing

The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

Was in Ottawa for the leadership reveal, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog reflecting on the race. First off, let me thank all the volunteers and party staff who worked during the weekend and throughout the race.

While the obvious winner was Justin Trudeau, and congratulations to his team are due, . . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

Was in Ottawa for the leadership reveal, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog reflecting on the race. First off, let me thank all the volunteers and party staff who worked during the weekend and throughout the race.

While the obvious winner was Justin Trudeau, and congratulations to his team are due, . . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

350 or bust: Saturday At The Movies

Beautiful!

calgaryliberal.com: Alberta Liberal and Federal Liberal Cooperation? Lets Go.

I was talking to one of my friends around the the university the other day and I brought up Raj Sherman’s interview in the Calgary Herald on some form of cooperation between the two Liberal parties in Alberta. It was an off-hand comment and I didn’t really expect a conversation to come of it. He . . . → Read More: calgaryliberal.com: Alberta Liberal and Federal Liberal Cooperation? Lets Go.

Accidental Deliberations: On first steps

I’m skeptical about Paul Adams’ argument that some type of electoral non-compete agreement between the NDP and the Libs is inevitable an election cycle or two down the road. But he does hint at something close to the type of cooperation that I could see as useful in the meantime: (T)here is a very slight . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On first steps

Impolitical: Liberals on cooperation

From a letter distributed to the leadership campaigns last week, some content of interest on the issue of cooperation that you may not be hearing in other channels. Ron Hartling ran for the party presidency last year and is the President of the Kingston riding association. Ron is neutral in this leadership race, to be . . . → Read More: Impolitical: Liberals on cooperation

Song of the Watermelon: Playing to the Left: Joyce Murray and the Liberal Leadership Race

I still have nothing to say about golden boy Justin Trudeau. For the life of me, I cannot seem to form an opinion of the man one way or the other.

Nice hair, I guess. But meh.

In the wake of yesterday’s Liberal Party of Canada leadership debate, Joyce Murray is the candidate I . . . → Read More: Song of the Watermelon: Playing to the Left: Joyce Murray and the Liberal Leadership Race