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Writings of J. Todd Ring: New studies show generosity and cooperation are both natural and intelligent

A new study shows a mathematical proof that generosity leads to evolutionary success. Biologists offer a mathematically based explanation for why cooperation and generosity have evolved in nature [Credit: Web] “Ever since Darwin,” Plotkin said, “biologists have been puzzled about why there is so much apparent cooperation, and even flat-out generosity and altruism, in nature.” “When […]

Leftist Jab: Justin Trudeau’s Message to Elizabeth May: Not Running A Candidate in Labrador Is Patronizing

Why does the Green Party want to cooperate with the Liberals again?

Consider Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May who’s fought for progressives to cooperate in elections. To that effect, the Green Party has not fielded a candidate in the Labrador by-election as she explains in this statement:

The Green Party is committed to electoral cooperation in the interest of proportional

The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

Was in Ottawa for the leadership reveal, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog reflecting on the race. First off, let me thank all the volunteers and party staff who worked during the weekend and throughout the race.

While the obvious winner was Justin Trudeau, and congratulations to his team are due, I thought I’d write about who I think are the more subtle winners and losers from both the weekend and the race as a whole. Presented in no particular order.

WINNERS

-George Takach

Takach wasn’t taken the most seriously at the start of the race, but

. . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

Was in Ottawa for the leadership reveal, and I’ve been meaning to write a blog reflecting on the race. First off, let me thank all the volunteers and party staff who worked during the weekend and throughout the race.

While the obvious winner was Justin Trudeau, and congratulations to his team are due, I thought I’d write about who I think are the more subtle winners and losers from both the weekend and the race as a whole. Presented in no particular order.

WINNERS

-George Takach

Takach wasn’t taken the most seriously at the start of the race, but

. . . → Read More: The Liberal Scarf: Winners and losers in the LPC leadership race – besides the obvious winner

350 or bust: Saturday At The Movies

Beautiful!

calgaryliberal.com: Alberta Liberal and Federal Liberal Cooperation? Lets Go.

I was talking to one of my friends around the the university the other day and I brought up Raj Sherman’s interview in the Calgary Herald on some form of cooperation between the two Liberal parties in Alberta. It was an off-hand comment and I didn’t really expect a conversation to come of it. He [...]

Accidental Deliberations: On first steps

I’m skeptical about Paul Adams’ argument that some type of electoral non-compete agreement between the NDP and the Libs is inevitable an election cycle or two down the road. But he does hint at something close to the type of cooperation that I could see as useful in the meantime: (T)here is a very slight possibility that there will be yet another opening to the idea [of a non-compete deal] before the 2015 election. If the Conservatives were to start polling quite a bit stronger — say nearer the 40 per cent mark — and the Liberal and the NDP

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On first steps

Impolitical: Liberals on cooperation

From a letter distributed to the leadership campaigns last week, some content of interest on the issue of cooperation that you may not be hearing in other channels. Ron Hartling ran for the party presidency last year and is the President of the Kingston riding association. Ron is neutral in this leadership race, to be clear, and has committed to his riding to his neutrality. Following his email is some data shared by one of his riding executive members. From: Ron Hartling [mailto:ron.hartling@gmail.com] Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2013 04:00 PMTo: David Bertschi ; Martin Cauchon ; Deborah

. . . → Read More: Impolitical: Liberals on cooperation

Song of the Watermelon: Playing to the Left: Joyce Murray and the Liberal Leadership Race

I still have nothing to say about golden boy Justin Trudeau. For the life of me, I cannot seem to form an opinion of the man one way or the other.

Nice hair, I guess. But meh.

In the wake of yesterday’s Liberal Party of Canada leadership debate, Joyce Murray is the candidate I would prefer to write about. Something interesting has happened in her case: a decade after having presided over massive provincial environmental spending cuts as Minister of Water, Land and Air Protection in one of the most right-wing governments in BC history, she now appears to

. . . → Read More: Song of the Watermelon: Playing to the Left: Joyce Murray and the Liberal Leadership Race

Impolitical: Noted from the U.S.: Remaking politics

“Revealed: The Massive New Liberal Plan to Remake American Politics.” A month after President Barack Obama won reelection, top brass from three dozen of the most powerful groups in liberal politics met at the headquarters of the National Education Association (NEA), a few blocks north of the White House. Brought together by the Sierra Club, Greenpeace, Communication Workers of America (CWA), and the NAACP, the meeting was invite-only and off-the-record. Despite all the Democratic wins in November, a sense of outrage filled the room as labor officials, environmentalists, civil rights activists, immigration reformers, and a panoply of other progressive

. . . → Read More: Impolitical: Noted from the U.S.: Remaking politics

centerandleft: Endorsement for Joyce Murray

Murray Can Lead Canada Forward | Chris Wattie, Reuters (via National Post)

For almost seven years, Stephen Harper has been the Prime Minister. Canadian progressives unite in their call that “we can do better” and yet, little is done to meet actions with words. In the New Democratic leadership race, I backed Nathan Cullen for his progressive partnership proposal. It was bold, it was controversial, but it represented real leadership. Mr. Cullen challenged New Democratic progressives, presenting them with an opportunity for real, meaningful change. Mr. Cullen inspired many people with his surprising success, but New Democrats decided to meet

. . . → Read More: centerandleft: Endorsement for Joyce Murray

Impolitical: Notes from the cooperation front

From a Q & A with Bob Rae, an interesting excerpt on the Canadian political party dynamic: Speaking of teams, you have, as a New Democrat and a Liberal, probably experienced any number of election results and parliamentary situations. The recent spate of by-elections has stirred up the discussion again about cooperation and mergers and various alignments. Do you think that’s a discussion the Liberals and perhaps the New Democrats have to have, either individually or together? Or do you have to think about 2015 as going in there as distinct parties and rivals?

I think the leadership candidates

. . . → Read More: Impolitical: Notes from the cooperation front

Impolitical: More on cooperation

Noted in this op-ed about the Calgary Centre byelection aftermath: Leadership is important but it may not be party brass and power-brokers who usher in co-operation. If it happens, it is much more likely to occur at the local level when frustrated poli… . . . → Read More: Impolitical: More on cooperation

CuriosityCat: Why Justin Trudeau is running for leader of the Liberal Party of Canada

Justin Trudeau & hard work

Very interesting article in Macleans – an interview with Justin Trudeau:

“Can I actually make a difference? Can I get people to believe in politics once again? Can I get people to accept more complex answers to complex questions? I know I can. I know that’s what I do very well. Why am I doing this? Because I can, not because I want to. Because I must.” His voice drops to a whisper on the final word. The bells at the church across the road from the café where we’re sitting in his . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Why Justin Trudeau is running for leader of the Liberal Party of Canada

CuriosityCat: Is Justin Trudeau caught in the Power Trap, like Thomas Mulcair?

Hat tip to Kinsella for alerting us to the latest book (Power Trap etc.) by Professor Paul Adams of Carleton U. Adams worked on CBC’s The National as well as CBC Radio and for the Globe & Mail. Before that he worked for EKOS Research, managing political polling conducted for the Toronto Star and CBC.

The Power Trap: Barbara Yaffee describes Adams’ latest book this way: Paul Adams, author of The Power Trap

A new book that advocates a Liberal-NDP merger blames partisan pettiness and personal rivalries for the two parties’ refusal to play footsie. “New Democrats and . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Is Justin Trudeau caught in the Power Trap, like Thomas Mulcair?

CalgaryLiberal.com: Politics Isn’t Complicated: It’s Not Chess, It’s Cooking

People over-complicate things. And politics is one of those things. It isn’t complicated. It’s about the sum of personal relationships between many people guided by leadership, churned by passion, and basted by endurance. It’s the furthest thing from chess. It’s more like cooking. Or, at least, good cooking. You have good ingredients – an incredible candidate, an [...]

350 or bust: TED Talk Thursday: There’s A Green Brain Inside Every Climate Skeptic

Journalist and educator Simran Sethi discusses why and how we engage, and how we can listen to, and learn from, other points of view. Everyone concerned about climate change, and working for a better future for our children, should listen to her wisdom. * SimranSethi.com Baltimore Sun: Climate and conservatives

CuriosityCat: Should we choose David Merner as new leader of the Liberals, over Justin Trudeau?

Little seedlings of support for David Merner as the next leader of the LPC are sprouting up. Three seedlings Dan Arnold of the National Post has this to say about Werner: I’ll reserve judgment until I meet the man, but Merner does meet three of the requirements on the official “Liberal leadership BINGO card” – he was born in Alberta, used to play hockey, and is fluently bilingual. If we find out he’s Pierre Trudeau’s long lost nephew, the media will be head-over-heels in love with this man.

David Merner

Impolitical also sees David Merner as worthy of consideration: . . . → Read More: CuriosityCat: Should we choose David Merner as new leader of the Liberals, over Justin Trudeau?

CalgaryLiberal: A Merger That’ll Never Happen

The left in the province of Alberta will never merge. There are four core reasons for this to be the case. Firstly, the NDP is directly tied, through its organization, its employees (many of whom who work for the federal NDP as well), and other means, cannot get the nod for merger from Ottawa. This [...]

Accidental Deliberations: On speculative advances

Somehow most of the discussion of Thomas Mulcair’s Question Period appearance this morning seems to have missed what strikes me as the most important point. So let’s take a closer look at how his message has evolved from the leadership campaign – and how it figures to position the NDP to form government in 2015.

At first glance, Mulcair’s answer in response to a question focused on the possibility of a coalition government in 2015 might not seem like a particularly strong one: Mulcair said the party will be running candidates in all 338 federal ridings (adjusted with new additions)

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On speculative advances