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PostArctica: Walk # 18 – The Point Part 4

“If you look for the truth outside yourself, It gets farther and farther away. Today walking alone, I meet it everywhere I step. It is the same as me, yet I am not it. Only if you understand it in this way Will you merge with the way things are.” – Tung-Shan

The Point . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Walk # 18 – The Point Part 4

A Puff of Absurdity: Fixing French Immersion

The Agenda with Steve Paikin had a segment on French Immersion in the schools this week. The panel raised some interesting points but neglected a few issues.

A Bit of a Summary (skip down for more interesting bits)

The guests were Caroline Alfonso, an education reporter for the Globe & Mail (with a young child in immersion), Stuart Miller, the director of education (in Halton), John Lorinc, a journalist with older kids who went through immersion, and Mary Cruden the President of the Canadian Parents for French. Despite the fact that the show is titled, “The Problems with French Immersion,” the journalist seemed the only critic of the current program with some concerns that led to one of his kids changing streams.  Stuart raised some issues with the cost to run the program born of the fact that some schools are left with only four or five kids in the English stream, and with the unequal access to the program. It’s costly to run a class with such small numbers. But elsewhere he praised the educational benefits of a second language.

Enrollment in immersion programs is increasing across Canada, and Paikin asked the panel why so many parents want their kids in immersion. Caroline and Mary suggested parents want to have an extra tool in their tool basket, a leg up on the competition to give the kids an edge. Paikin offered that it might have something to do with being a proud Canadian, as was Trudeau-the-elder’s dream almost fifty years ago, but nobody bit at that one. From this panel’s perspective, parents put their kids in immersion to get them ahead of the curve. The fact that many students don’t make it to the end, didn’t seem to phase the guests. They believe that early intervention is key to greater success in the long run.

According to Stuart, immersion students don’t do significantly better or worse in the long run, however an article in Macleans disagrees (but without links or references to see the studies):

Working memory, used in activities like math, is improved, especially among those aged five to seven. Even reading scores in English are significantly higher for French immersion students than non-immersion students, according to a 2004 study, which noted the higher socio-economic background of French immersion students alone could not account for the stark difference…. [However,] turns out native English speakers living outside Canada’s sole francophone province are rather poor at keeping up their French skills as they get older. In 1996, 15 per cent of 15- to 19-year-old anglophones outside Quebec could conduct a conversation in both of Canada’s official languages. Fast forward 15 years and the bilingualism rate for 30- to 35-year-olds in 2011 was eight per cent.

If the results are accurate and statistically significant, then I still wonder if the immersion program itself is having the most significant effect on those results. Higher income might not be the primary variable, but students with parents who, regardless their income, advocate for them more, who push them more and who, therefore, might want them in immersion, will likely have kids who are higher achievers even if immersion weren’t available. I’d like to see a study compare parents with immersion in the area and parents without, not parents of immersion and non-immersion kids in one school. Ask many questions about their attitude towards schooling, their own education, and their income, and then, compare results against the success of their kids on a general, comprehensive test to see if parental attitude towards education affects kids more than the immersion program.

Because the panel raised one important issue about the way the program is actually running…

Teacher Shortages

It’s hard to get good teachers who are also bilingual. Stuart explained that, “Qualified and quality may be two different things,” and cited stats that 80% of principals struggle to find quality French teachers who can speak the language fluently AND are proficient in the subject matter. If they’re not francophone, prospective teachers have to keep up their French in university courses, but then take their teachable subject courses on top of that, all the science or math or history credits required to teach those subjects. It places an extra burden on the shoulders of teachers training to be immersion teachers who teach core subjects in a second language.

John spoke of a problem with many unqualified educators in the French stream; teachers have to teach multiple subject matters they’re not qualified for, or else they’re not strong enough in French to speak all day and they end up switching to English during most classes. Immersion students can miss out on some better classes with teachers stronger in the field in the English stream.

The shortage of good teachers is also a factor when students begin to struggle. There was much disagreement over whether or not it’s a problem or a benefit not to have parents with a command of French, but John is clear that it creates an extra barrier for children with homework that can’t be supported by parents at home. It creates an inequity if some parents can afford a tutor. Others thought that, if a student is struggling with the work, it should be the teacher that supports them at school. But, in my experience, that’s just not the reality of some situations. Some teachers would add supports in English to ensure the students didn’t get behind, but others were adamant that it would harm the integrity of the immersion program. I was lucky enough to tap into a group of parents who had copies of an English math workbook so I could help my daughter to understand the math concepts at home. But it was all very clandestine; we were sneak-learning the subject content. Learning shouldn’t feel so weirdly criminal. But without that, it can be really unclear whether the student is having a problem with subject matter (math) or with the language of instruction. How do we know which part needs remedial help?

Mary explained that what is the parent’s responsibility is to ensure that kids get authentic experiences in French in the community. I wouldn’t know where to find that in my own area, but the Ministry developed to connect parents to French experiences, something I didn’t know about until I saw the show. Unfortunately, most of the experiences are in bigger cities, adding to the divide between families of means and those without. I played tapes of French songs in my house from the time my kids were born, but I’ve never encountered a French experience in my community. That’s a different kettle of fish.

Inequality and Self-Segregation

Is immersion elitist? Some suggested that the program isn’t elitist, it’s just that some parents act like it is. According to Mary the Ministry FSL framework includes students with special needs. The Ministry says they will get support they need. She insists that it’s a myth that some children are more suited to FI than other, and that’s not supported by research. If teachers identify the learning issues, they find students will have it whether they’re in immersion or not.  She says we can’t allow quiet conversations about the student who isn’t suited to the program rather than actually supporting the struggling learning. FSL classrooms should reflect the demographic of all kids in that board. But Stuart added that this is all related to teacher shortage. Immersion should have the same supports, but they don’t have Spec Ed teachers who speak French. All support is delivered in English.

To me, that the intention is to offer it to everyone is irrelevant when it’s only offered to a few. That it’s a scarce resource makes it desirable. The fact that some people have an easier time getting in than others, creates an inequity at the intake. The fact that some people have an easier time helping their children because of their own French background or their ability to afford a tutor and trips to Ottawa, creates inequity throughout. Any parent can cut an apple into sections to talk about fractions with their kids if they’re struggling with the concept, but not every parent can help with the French instruction when their child hits a wall.

There’s also an underlying sense, as Mary suggested, that students should be a “good fit” for the program, that it’s really NOT for everyone, and some students are just not suited to it. How can it possibly be said to be offered equally if it’s overtly stated that there’s a type of student that should be admitted. And, as some suggested, there’s not a significant effort to help struggling students. Students who have difficulties with French are coaxed to drop down to the English stream.

And this is the part that starts to feels pretty slimy. Immersion can be a way to get kids away from “undesirable influences” that might include students with behavioural issues, new Canadians, and students less inclined towards school. That’s an unspoken piece of all this. Some parents might be streaming not for the mental benefits, but for the peer group. They don’t want any weird kids in the class next to their darlings. Parents are more overt about this in some circles, and we all need to be reminded of the dangers of this line of reasoning. I would much rather my kid talk to all sorts of different types of people in a classroom than have aspiration for Harvard. That’s what makes for a healthy society. Too many are forgetting that. It’s like Chomsky was on about a while back – we’ve shifted from a mindset of solidarity to competition, and it’s absolutely essential that we make the effort to shift back!

Stuart adds that there’s a perception that the French stream is more rigorous but he denies that to be the case. There’s a concern with the kids who are behind. There has to be better supports for students struggling in French without taking them out of French. Caroline suggested that the idea that the English stream is seen as a place for kids with behavioural needs is a mentality of parents and of teachers who encourage French as if the English program is inferior, which needs to change. John thought that kids should get into the program randomly to reduce the elitism of the program, but I don’t see that as a viable solution. It would just cause different problems.

What They Didn’t Say

They didn’t talk about the overall results of immersion for Canada as a country:

When our cultural norms change, it can take a while for education to match it. When we were finally required to introduce people of a variety of ethnicities and genders in our history courses (surprisingly recently), that sent me scrambling for new resources because I had been teaching what I had been taught in university: all about dead, white men. It will be a few years and a lot of work for teachers to overcome our own narrow education of old.

But we’ve had immersion in our grade schools for many decades now. It’s surprising to me that it seems we haven’t actually produced a significantly more bilingual country, at least not significant enough to adequately teach the next generation. I would have liked to hear them address why immersion students aren’t still fluent after university, and why there aren’t more of them in education? If our goal is a bilingual country, and the middle-aged early adopters have forgotten all their French, we’re obviously not going about it the right way.

They also didn’t discuss one facet of the student experience that is my greatest concern:

Full disclosure: I teach in a high school that offers immersion, and I live an area that offers immersion at the local primary school, but I actually tried to have my first little one go to a different school. I discovered that parents can apply to have their child go to an immersion school far from home, but they can’t apply to go to a non-immersion school. What I saw happening at the local school and in my neighbourhood was the development of a strikingly divisive student body, and I didn’t want my kids to have any part of that.

Because of the attitudes of some teachers and parents who see the French program as superior, the students are living that artificial hierarchy. From what I’ve seen, they begin to treat one another differently as early as grade 1. It’s the English Muffins vs the French Fries. Some students who struggle in the French, and don’t get adequate supports, are loath to shift “down” to the English because of the stigma involved. That there’s a palpable stigma that comes with being unilingual in a school that offers immersion is a serious problem. Schools should be about opening doors for kids, of breaking barriers and fostering a sense of equality, not arrogantly suggesting that one type of kid is better than the rest.  That attitude has no place in our school systems. But there it is. We’ve fought so hard to divorce ourselves from any notion of class divisions in our land of the free, yet we’ve created that very experience for our six-year-olds.

I mentioned on Facebook recently that a surprising number of my academic students didn’t hand in their first assignment in my class this term. A former student commented to the effect that it’s probably just the English stream students. The implication is that French Immersion students always get their work done on time and English kids are slackers. This prejudice doesn’t go away after they leave school, even as they lose their French. They still see a division between them and us that we fostered in grade school.

Schools could help to override this by joining the classes together in each grade for co-operative games and dividing them differently for some classes, like phys ed. There has to be regular integration of the two streams from the first day on. We all promote integration in every other way, except this one. Schools must create an atmosphere of inclusion, and immersion schools have to work harder at this one.

Schools have become competitive in other ways with parents suggesting their child wants to take a subject they have no interest in just to get them into a specific school.  This further divides student bodies and divides communities. I want kids walking to the school down the street together instead of half of them being bussed across town for a special program that’s rarely all that special. Some teachers promote their school, not just as another great school in the region, but the ultimate learning environment, without acknowledging the problems with this type of abject loyalty. I love my school to bits, but we have to keep an eye on the broader arena to ensure excellent education across the region, and country, and world. Solidarity is key.

Can it Be Fixed?

If we agree that learning a second language is good for kids’s brains, and if our goal is to have a bilingual country, then everyone should learn French in school from JK on. When kids struggle with learning math, we don’t stream them in such a way that they don’t have to take it again until grade 4. They get lots of extra help to meet the standards required by the curriculum by the end of the year.  It’s a serious problem to acknowledge that something is really good for kids’ brains, but allow parents to opt out. It’s an even more serious problem that some parents want their kids in the program but there are not enough available spots. Imagine if your kids couldn’t learn math for a couple years because there’s just not enough places for them. If we agree it’s really good for kids, then we have to make it happen for all our kids.

And it has to start at junior kindergarten to take advantage of the younger sponge-like ability to learn a new language. According to recent studies, the optimal time to learn a second language is in the first two years of life, and the decline in the ability to learn one can start as early as age five. Grade one is way too late. We need more immersion in the early grades and in daycares where they’re talking more and writing less (and no dictée quite yet, please), and then we can work on maintenance throughout the rest of the grades. The early years will help with the natural acquisition of verb tenses and pronunciation, and the later years can focus on developing better writing ability.

But I advocate for this instead of half day immersion in the later grades. If I were queen of the province, and I knew we couldn’t provide enough French teachers to accommodate all students from grades 1 to 12 (because we didn’t actually create a significant bilingual population…yet), then I’d move the available teachers to JK and SK classrooms for half days at all schools, and I’d offer incentives for daycares to have at least one French ECE on board, and for summer camps to have at least half the counsellors speaking French. I’d have rather my children played tag and learned how to canoe in French than have learned long division and how to memorize lists of words.

If the important thing is ensuring the best education for everyone, and we don’t have the expertise to do it fully, then we have to offer a partial program to everyone rather than a full program for a select few. But from this panel discussion, and from discussions with students and parents, I don’t get the impression that the best education system for all our kids is what’s most important to people. What really matters is that some people get a little more than others. As they said right from the start, they want a leg up, an extra edge. That’s a bigger problem of promoting the individual at the expense of the community, and it has to be ameliorated.

With full immersion in younger grades and only one class a term in later grades, students would still be able work towards a certificate, not through taking the right number of hours of French each year, but by having their fluency tested at the end. That would give them the incentive to maintain their French speaking and writing ability throughout high school at after school programs or just with conversations with peers – who would all have taken French since they were three or four.  It wouldn’t be an extra, a burden, if it were learned well at a young age when all children are primed for language acquisition.

This would reduce problems with teachers who are less proficient in other subject areas in higher grades. And it would reduce the competition for an extra goodie for the select or lucky few. And, over another generation or two, we might undo the unsavoury class-divisions we’ve unwittingly established.

. . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Fixing French Immersion

PostArctica: Saying Goodbye To Summer

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PostArctica: Walk # 15 – The Point Part 2

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PostArctica: Walk # 9

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Dead Wild Roses: Why We Need to Stay Connected to Reality – Nick Turse

Our society is being influenced negatively by the consumerist culture that we, collectively, have taken our hands off the tiller and have let the market decide what is best for us and our cultures. The idea that we can consume our way to happiness, well-being, or even a more just society would not compute […] . . . → Read More: Dead Wild Roses: Why We Need to Stay Connected to Reality – Nick Turse

A Puff of Absurdity: Avoiding the Lesser of Two Evils

It’s not my country, but what happens in America affect the world. And we’re right next door. The Left Forum had a panel discussion a couple weeks ago with Glen Ford, Chris Hedges, and Jill Stein, chaired by Linda Thompson, that’s worth… . . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Avoiding the Lesser of Two Evils

A Puff of Absurdity: Avoiding the Lesser of Two Evils

It’s not my country, but what happens in America affect the world. And we’re right next door. The Left Forum had a panel discussion a couple weeks ago with Glen FordChris Hedges, and Jill Stein, chaired by Linda Thompson, that’s worth a listen. It’s two hours long, and a feat of tolerance for all the chattering and cell phones in the audience, so I summarized some highlights below.

In a nutshell, Clinton is just as scary as Trump, so everyone who hoped to vote for Sanders, should vote for the Green Party or any independent party if Sanders doesn’t win in the primaries. The Greens are unlikely to win, but it will send a clear message that there are enough Americans who care about reform, that they won’t fall for the ideology that there are only two parties running. Here are their arguments heavily condensed and slightly paraphrased:

Hedges on the Façade of a Two-Party System:

“Once the neo-liberal ideology is no longer able to hold the loyalty of a population, those regimes will collapse. Mechanisms that defend power are no longer willing to work on its behalf. That process of revolutionary change is slow and often invisible. The facade of the superstructure remains in place. That is precisely where we are in American history. It’s incumbent upon those who care for the socialist society, that we step outside these structures, even if we remain a minority, so that we provide an alternative to this power.  

Nationalism is a disease which has infected both parties. It deifies the military. It sucks people into its orbit; it has at its disposal powerful forms of indoctrination that stokes the kind of proto-fascism we see at Trump rallies. Democrats are as culpable as Republicans at creating this toxic environment. Clintons are built on loyalty to corporate power and white supremacy. They passed the three-strikes law, massively expanded sentences, expanded the prison industrial complex, pushed through the first trade agreement. John Ralston Saul called Bill Clinton’s administration a corporate coup d’état.  

Sanders was okay with Israelis bombing Palestinian communities. He’s an AIPAC wind-up doll. He’s been in the pockets of the Clintons for a long time; he campaigned for Bill Clinton in 2004. He’s got a faustian bargain with the Democrats, and he’s naive to think he could compete fairly in the primaries.  

We owe it to our children to step outside this system and begin to fight back. We’ll never achieve power through political parties. All of our energy has to be invested in movement. We have to knit groups together (anti-fracking, black lives matter, fight for the minimum wage…) and carry out sustained acts of civil disobedience. The ability to reform from within the structures of power has been taken from us.

Stein on the Lesser Evil Agenda:

“I’m most horrified by a political system that gives two lethal choices and says pick between them. This is a reflection of inherent dysfunctions in this system. Both are minority parties, so it’s important that we seize this moment. A report from NOAA last week discussed an Oh my God report confirming that we could expect nine feet of sea level rise by 2050 if we don’t take profoundly different action by then. Instead we get drill baby drill on steroids not only increasing, but accelerating.

While agreement in Paris was being forged, and Obama was celebrating, they were behind close doors, signing on to the end of the oil export ban which massively increases oil exploration. We have a choice of a corporate vision with a smile or without a smile. Both parties are funded by same predatory banks, fossil fuel giants, and war profiteers. It’s clear we can’t keep going in this direction. Climate meltdown has a deadline. By 2050 all of the coastal US cities will be under water and 600 million people will be refugees. The greater evil is the economic meltdown we’re looking at. Banks are bigger than ever.

But we actually have the power. Alice Walker said that the biggest way we give up power is not knowing we have it in the first place. If we don’t fight in the halls of power, then we’re basically raising the white flag of surrender, and we’ll be bulldozed by the stroke of a pen. The great news is that we have the power to stand up. If you take just people locked into predatory student debt, locked into economic servitude, and those people are 43 million strong, that is a winning plurality in a presidential race. There’s only one party who will bail them out if that word gets out. It doesn’t take a whole lot of motivation to see it can be erased with a stroke of a pen if they vote Green. We’re in the polls now where Sanders was six months ago. As Bernie’s campaign begins to fold in a path of sabotage, we can’t have a revolutionary campaign in a counter-revolutionary party.

We need coalitions. Change is not going to happen under Clinton. We need to stand up now if we want to decommission nuclear power plants on the coast because they will flood out. We should be telling supreme court what to do. We did it in the 60s. We brought troops home; brought in clean air act and clean water act. Don’t accept that we’re powerless. We are powerful. And we have the numbers it takes to win the battle. We just need the courage of our convictions. There’s an attitude of cowardice that is unleashed when we’re told to accept voting for the lesser evil. We need to have courage. It’s time to forget the lesser evil and fight for the greater good like our lives depend on it, because they do. 

The lesser evil paves the way for the greatest evil and makes it inevitable. People can’t mobilize themselves; witness the beating Sanders is getting. That party is being hijacked. Through the policies of the Clintons, we got the makings of Trump. We got the right-wing populism which is a response to the economic desperation of the people caused by Clinton. In terms of the nuclear threat, the Obama administration withdrew from the anti-ballistic missile treaty which was the main tool to move towards nuclear disarmament, and now the Obama administration is leading a trillion dollar movement towards nuclear war. We know what Hillary will do. She wants to take an airborne attack. Trump is risky, but Hillary is certain death.

Thompson on Some Problems with the Left:

Che Guevara said that revolutionaries are motivated by great feelings of love. The left is bad for getting too intellectual and has problems expressing that love. People have to feel safe abandoning the lesser evil and going for the unknown. Unity is the key. There are lots of little tiny groups of activist that have to unite. 

A lot of the problem isn’t Trump, it’s the corporate media and the 1%. The left-wing media is to blame as well. Amy Goodman has blacked out Jill’s campaign as much as the right-wing media does. There’s a section of Democracy Now where you can say what you want to see on their show. Ask them why she’s not covering these parties. We can’t let them get away with this anymore. Call for a revolution.

Hedges on the Prison System and Fascism:

We have to stop talking about people within the system of mass incarceration and focusing on non-violent drug offenders. There are round-ups of everyone in the room in a drug deal. 94% of the people incarcerated never go to trial. They slap all sorts of charges on you that you didn’t commit. They tell you, if you go to trial, you’ll be charged with all of it, and you’ll never win. But if you accept the plea of 11 years, we’ll cut this and this. 80% of the people in the prison system shouldn’t be there. The whole system lynched them. My students with the longest sentences went to trial because they didn’t commit the crime, and they punished them with 30-year sentences. 

Fascism rises out of a political vacuum. We have to stop getting conned into the personality. We have to see the system for what it is. In terms of fossil fuels, war machines, etc., there will be no difference between Trump and Clinton. Read Democracy Incorporated by Sheldon Wolin to get an understanding of how inverted totalitarianism works. Neither Clinton nor Trump will set up a reasonable environmental policy. In this system there’s no way to vote against Exxon Mobile. 

Ford on Black Leaders

“Some black leaders are still corporate owned. We can’t just vote for people who look like us. We have to support people with values, people willing to stand up against racism and imperialism. We have to get away from skin-based politics.”

Stein added, “The Malcolm X Grassroots Movement put together a plan in the context of an emergency of racial injustice that demands attention.”

A commenter added: “Society can’t be dominated by white progressive and white liberals. There are so many overt displays of white supremacy, that black people don’t want to join them. We need to think of a society where you don’t have control of most of the land, because it wasn’t yours to begin with.”

Hedges on Fighting for Marginalized Communities: 

Within marginal communities the system of capitalism has created a system of perpetual evictions, which has affected the psychological health of citizens and the cohesive nature of neighbourhoods. In the 30s, people would get up and block sheriffs from bringing foreclosures. Capitalism destroys the cohesiveness that make that resistance possible. Men are in prison and women and children are evicted. Marx called this surplus labour. People are preyed upon. They lock you in a cage to generate $40-50 thousand a year. Whole corporate entities (moving companies, storage companies, insurance…) are built around benefiting from systems of oppression. 

We’re not in those community to see what’s been done to crush those people. None of us could endure that. It gets back to the dark system of corporate capitalism. You have to look now at sacrifice zones – at what we have allowed to be done to the vulnerable in society. We’ve gotten caught up in the boutique activism of personality politics. Feminism should be about empowering oppressed women, but it’s about having a woman president and woman CEOs. The bottom ⅔ of blacks in the country are worse off than when King marched. White liberals are caught in the game of diverting attention from horrific, brutal, cruel forms of injustice. I teach in a prison because I wouldn’t know otherwise. These people are invisible. They vanish. Newspapers don’t even have labour journalists any more. 

Ford added: “It’s not just white liberals – it’s those who have become collaborators with this corporate system. In every struggle for independence of colonialist power, we have to kill more fellow African-Americans in order to get to the enemy.”

Stein: “It’s our job, as privileged white people who have enormous benefits from the system, to support the community and struggle in their fights as they define them. They’re already organizing; our job is to help. There have been victories in indigenous land and treaty rights. The support of environmental communities is critical to those victories. This is a model to support.”

Hedges: “In the prisons, they are so far ahead of us politically. They don’t think anybody’s going to overcome the lobbyists. They are organizing a mass prison strike. It’s going on right now across the country. It started in Alabama. I will be cross-country on September 9th, the anniversary of Attica. In system of neo-slavery, no prison runs without prison labour. Don’t go to the state house or the capital to protest, go to the prison house to show us you’re there. These people have so much courage. They broke their strike in Alabama by refusing to feed them. They are a highly conscious politically oppressed group who are rising up with integrity to fight back, and we have to stand with them.”

Thompson: “We don’t need to reinvent the wheel. We need to re-invigorate the discussion the Panthers started. They already created a 10-point program.”

Ford: “We need to decolonize Puerto Rico and forgive the debts.”

Stein: “We need to liberate the public airways. The president could instruct federal communication to stop the privatization of airways. When the FCC looked at privatizing internet, there was a social movement that stopped it.

Commenter: “We need to be willing to be under the leadership of The African People’s Socialist Party and go to the prisons. It’s the only way to be in touch in a vital, emotional way or else it gets too abstract.  A lot of things we debate are moot.  39,000 strikers are protesting a destructive company that gets 1.8 million per month in a template that’s the demise of the working class. They shipped call centres to Trinidad.

Hedges: “Workers are reduced to serfs across the board. The problem is multifaceted. It’s partly the fault of the unions who made concessions to corporations. But this is what’s going to happen to all of us  It’s a reconfiguration of the economy to neo-feudalism with prisons that feed like sharks off them, where a phone call home costs 5 times the actual costs, and prisoners have to pay from their $28/month wages.”

Stein: “The media calls Verizon strikers greedy, but it’s not just about wages. They’re demonized because they’re asking for more than living wage. We’re moving to a system in which a poverty wage is acceptable; it’s important to be vocal to support the strike.”

Ford: “It is all about the cost of labour and the race to the bottom driven by the tremendous wage differentials in the world.”

Stein: “We need social movements. They are the engine of social change. Political parties are able to unite social coalitions. A real political party is an effort to bring people together under a common agenda. There’s not a conflict between working for electoral parties and social parties.”

Hedges: “The next trade agreement will destroy the post office. It says that no government enterprise can exist unless corporations can compete with them. It’s the same reason hedge funds run charter schools. Marx explained that in late stages of capitalism, as you disenfranchise the country, you disembowel the state structures in order to make profits.”

To sum it up: We have the ability to make this change. It feels like there are a lot of issues to address, but there’s really just one: the neo-liberal agenda to profit off the back of the people. And it’s being promoted by the Democrats as much as the Republicans. We need to continue to have candidates run that come out of the movement. And we actually have to vote for them.


. . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Avoiding the Lesser of Two Evils

PostArctica: Fantastic Night In Verdun

Friday evening was a celebration of a wonderful project started over a year ago by the Comité d’action des citoyennes et citoyens de Verdun (CACV). The basic idea is to […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Fantastic Night In Verdun

PostArctica: Great Day At Dawson Community Centre.

I went to dances at this place as a teenager so it’s extra cool to have had a chance to hang out today at the annual Race for Kids/ Street […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Great Day At Dawson Community Centre.

PostArctica: Walk # 2 Part 2

“Cities have always offered anonymity, variety, and conjunction, qualities best basked in by walking: one does not have to go into the bakery or the fortune-teller’s, only to know that […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Walk # 2 Part 2

PostArctica: Walk # 2 Part 1

“With cities, it is as with dreams: everything imaginable can be dreamed, but even the most unexpected dream is a rebus that conceals a desire or, its reverse, a fear. […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Walk # 2 Part 1

PostArctica: Walk # 1

“Being human is itself difficult, and therefore all kinds of settlements (except dream cities) have problems. Big cities have difficulties in abundance, because they have people in abundance.” ― Jane […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Walk # 1

PostArctica: More Backlog

Some more pictures from over the last 4 or 5 months. . . . → Read More: PostArctica: More Backlog

PostArctica: Backlog

Some more from recent months. . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Backlog

PostArctica: Trouble On Troy?

Walking down here yesterday and this valve thing started to blow. It’s a strange sight with pipes leading from one fire hydrant to another. The other side of the street […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Trouble On Troy?

PostArctica: Today’s Walk

Went to the Point today, not a long walk but a good one. Marguerite Bourgeoys Park. Random telephoto shot of sculpture in the park. Further up Wellington. Les Filles du Roi. […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Today’s Walk

Wise Law Blog: Up All Night

If you follow us on Twitter, you may have noticed that our office recently had the opportunity to both attend and support the Up All Night event, held at Centennial College. The purpose? For the community to come together for one night to focus on… . . . → Read More: Wise Law Blog: Up All Night

PostArctica: Dirt

  Dirt Dirt is an ongoing visual project that addresses ideas concerning the city in the period before the Arctic collapse (Polar Caps buh bye). It is really just a […] . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Dirt