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Things Are Good: Email, Productivity, And How You Feel

Dealing with an endless stream of emails is challenge in any office environment – even just socially it can be rather taxing. The solution to email always seems to be just around the corner with a new startup from Silicon Valley appearing every year to “save” us from email. Here’s an idea it’s not that […]

The post Email, Productivity, And How You Feel appeared first on Things Are Good.

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Christy's Houseful of Chaos » politics: GMOs and politicians: how do we know what is true or not?

I had a really good facebook conversation yesterday, in a public page about politics. The topic was one GMOs and I was taking a position that would have been inconceivable to me several years ago. I was arguing against mandatory labelling of GMOs.

Someone else made a really good comment saying that the labelling shouldn’t . . . → Read More: Christy’s Houseful of Chaos » politics: GMOs and politicians: how do we know what is true or not?

Scripturient: Propaganda?

Last term, when council sent out community newsletters to keep residents informed, the illiterati screamed these were ‘propaganda’ and a waste of tax dollars.* Now this council has done the same thing and these nattering nabobs of negativity have raised their voices and screamed… nothing. Their silence is deafening. Well, they wouldn’t want to embarrass . . . → Read More: Scripturient: Propaganda?

Babel-on-the-Bay: The Candidate: That pre-writ lit.

Part 2 of our series for Canada’s federal candidates.

There are many arguments about the literature required by candidates in the pre-writ period (the time between being chosen as the candidate and the election call being official). If the Prime Minister decides to wait for the chosen date of October 19, you can expect the . . . → Read More: Babel-on-the-Bay: The Candidate: That pre-writ lit.

Melissa Fong: Emotional Intelligence? Can you tell the expression just by their eyes? QUIZ!

It is remarkable how humans can understand emotions. Many of you know that the way to tell a person’s emotions is within their eyes. Forget the smile on their face- […]

Chadwick's Blog & Commentary: The Decline in Media Credibility and Profitability

Last August the Pew research Center released the results of its latest study on how much the American public trusts the media. This has been part of an ongoing study since at least 2002, and ever since the first report, … Continue reading →

Chadwick's Blog & Commentary: But is it news?

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford seems to get more than his fair share of headlines these days, most of them negative. The stories that follow are full of allegation, innuendo and “unnamed sources.” Gripping tabloid stuff. Real time soap opera. But … Continue reading →

Politics Canada: Why Justin Trudeau can not ‘stay positive’

In the world of politics the fight can really only stay as clean as your dirtiest player and the Conservative Party of Canada could not be a dirtier player. They are the textbook example of Karl Rove’s warped, cynical play-book.

The latest attack ads against Justin Trudeau demonstrate how low they are willing to go, . . . → Read More: Politics Canada: Why Justin Trudeau can not ‘stay positive’

Melissa Fong: Deafness, speech and the Performance of Gender

Deafness, speech and the Performance of Gender This weekend I had the privilege of participating in a conference on Disability and Ableism at Ryerson University. Let me just say first that it is an incredible feeling to be among people fluent in American Sign Language (ASL). To see them speak with gesture in silence can . . . → Read More: Melissa Fong: Deafness, speech and the Performance of Gender

Another Step to Take: confidentiality agreements and power imbalances

One of the many things that makes me uncomfortable with the way our laws work is the abundance and acceptance of confidentiality rules.

I’m thinking about things like clauses in employment contracts that prohibit the employee from talking with their coworkers about how much they earn. This allows employers to pay different wages for . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: confidentiality agreements and power imbalances

Another Step to Take: is there such a thing as a neutral education system?

I love it when similar or related ideas appear in several parts of my life at once. There’s been a number of things that come together to make me think again about education and the question of whether an education system can be neutral. I write about this as someone whose children are not in . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: is there such a thing as a neutral education system?

Another Step to Take: Interacting with those we disagree with

What do you do with people you don’t agree with? Do you agree to keep quiet about the topics you disagree on? Do you cut them out of your life? Or keep them in your life but with a mental note not to take seriously any of their opinions? Do you argue incessantly?

These questions . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: Interacting with those we disagree with

Another Step to Take: my thoughts on Paved With Good Intentions: Canada’s development NGOs from idealism to imperialism

I’m getting ready to return the book Paved With Good Intentions: Canada’s development NGOs from idealism to imperialism by Kikolas Barry-Shaw and Dru Oja Jay back to the friend who lent it to me, but I want to make a few notes about ideas I found interesting. I know a different friend who blogged about the same book, . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: my thoughts on Paved With Good Intentions: Canada’s development NGOs from idealism to imperialism

Another Step to Take: Tears for Nanertak – a children’s book about climate change

I received in the mail an absolutely stunning hard covered picture book to review. It is called Tears for Nanertak and it is written and illustrated by Skip Hofstrand. As I look through it I can imagine myself wandering the halls of an art gallery admiring an arctic exhibit. The stunning water color paintings capture . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: Tears for Nanertak – a children’s book about climate change

Another Step to Take: Thoughts on a City Council Meeting

I went yesterday to a city council meeting. I was there with just over 30 people to watch the passing of a motion to have our city council request that the provincial government reverse the cuts to the Community Start Up and Maintenance Benefit. So the part I was there for took all of three . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: Thoughts on a City Council Meeting

Another Step to Take: Personal Responsibility in the Age of Unlimited Choices

Have you ever heard of “cafeteria religion”? The term refers to the idea of people treating religion like a buffet table where they can pick and choose what parts they want rather than accept someone else’s menu. It is an idea I’ve had trouble with for a while. On one hand I can see definite . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: Personal Responsibility in the Age of Unlimited Choices

Another Step to Take: safety, efficiency, cost of human lives and work

My children watched part of Back to the Future III a few days ago and afterwards expressed surprise at the amount of walking on train tracks that happens in the show. “Isn’t that dangerous?” they asked and I fumbled to explain how the absolute risk wasn’t that high but that it was still a completely . . . → Read More: Another Step to Take: safety, efficiency, cost of human lives and work

Things Are Good: A Better Approach Than Zero Tolerance in Schools

A school in Walla Walla was essentially a dumping ground for all the students deemed to have behavioural problems and their explosion rate was through the roof. This all changed when a principal ditched the atrocious zero tolerance policy that the school was using (many schools in North America punish and demean students this way). . . . → Read More: Things Are Good: A Better Approach Than Zero Tolerance in Schools

Things Are Good: Talking About Cities With People Who Don’t Live in One

When it comes to talking about the divide between urban and non-urban living there’s more differences than just who lives in a more sustainable community. People living in non-urban areas just don’t understand the positive urban living that is being espoused, and in fact, can take insult to how pro-urban thinkers (like me) talk about . . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Talking About Cities With People Who Don’t Live in One

Politics Canada: Liberals need an aggressive communications strategy

The only way to stop the Conservative attack machine is to hit it back, hard. This means creating an attack ad that will register with viewers, something that the Liberals have not been very effective at.

While it is good to see the quick response from Rae, it will probably not be effective, he mentions . . . → Read More: Politics Canada: Liberals need an aggressive communications strategy

Polygonic: La France Forte, or Why You Desperately Need Sarko Standing On the Beach

The French presidential campaign is kicking into high gear, and Nicolas Sarkozy has one key message for his ungrateful people: vote him back in, and he promises to spend his second term standing on the beach, like a magnificant granite Colossus, liquifying overseas demons with the sheer power of his blue-eyed gaze.

Don’t believe . . . → Read More: Polygonic: La France Forte, or Why You Desperately Need Sarko Standing On the Beach

Challenging the Commonplace: Why Not a Metered Internet?

The headline of the Globe and Mail article asks the question, Why Not a Metered Internet? The argument that follows defends the big telecoms in terms of market forces: for example, the cost of infrastructure building. Here’s a different answer to the… . . . → Read More: Challenging the Commonplace: Why Not a Metered Internet?

Challenging the Commonplace: Why Not a Metered Internet?

The headline of the Globe and Mail article asks the question, Why Not a Metered Internet?

The argument that follows defends the big telecoms in terms of market forces: for example, the cost of infrastructure building.

Here’s a different answer to the question: with a metered Internet we would have another case of them that . . . → Read More: Challenging the Commonplace: Why Not a Metered Internet?