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daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Notley’s Climate Change plan earns Trudeau’s Pipeline approval

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced today the fate of three pipelines that have dominated political debate in Alberta over the past six years. Yes to Kinder Morgan Trans-Mountain Pipeline. No to the controversial Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipeline. Yes to the… Continue Reading →

Environmental Law Alert Blog: Trudeau’s pipeline approvals fail to recognize the “magnitude” of the climate problem

Thursday, December 1, 2016

The thing that frustrated me most when watching the Prime Minister’s press conference earlier this week approving the Kinder Morgan and Line 3 pipelines is that he – or at least his government – knows that these pipelines undermine Canada’s climate goals and move us away from a . . . → Read More: Environmental Law Alert Blog: Trudeau’s pipeline approvals fail to recognize the “magnitude” of the climate problem

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Miles Corak asks how we should see the growing concentration of income at the top of the spectrum, and concludes that we should be concerned mostly with the breakdown between personal merit and success among the extremely privileged: Connections matter. And for the top earners this might even . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Janice Fine discusses how the decline of organized labour as a political force has opened the door for the likes of Donald Trump: Just when we need them most, the main institutions that have fought for decent jobs are a shadow of their former selves. Unions that . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

A Puff of Absurdity: Monbiot’s Impossible Crises

George Monbiot lists 13 crises, but warns you should only read the list if you’re feeling very strong. It’s an appropriate warning.

He’s barely even talking about climate change here, so this list could be so much longer including the degradation of the oceans, poisoned waterways, messed up ecosystems…  His list is more political . . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Monbiot’s Impossible Crises

A Puff of Absurdity: Standing Rock Resistance

Chris Hedges is in Standing Rock, back to his original career as a war correspondent. The natives there are preparing for winter, and I’m struck by the contrast to the Occupy fight that dwindled away when things got cold. I’m curled up on the couch as I write that, so I mean no disrespect. . . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Standing Rock Resistance

daveberta.ca – Alberta Politics: Notley owes Alberta’s coal communities an in-person visit

Mr. Jean: Thank you. The NDP has found time to fly to Paris, to Morocco, but they haven’t found time to visit communities like Hanna and Parkland county. They haven’t taken the time to look in the faces of the… Continue Reading →

A Puff of Absurdity: Water as a Human Right

In a recent article in my local paper, Peter Shawn Taylor says that anyone who wants to stop Nestle from draining aquifers doesn’t understand economics and is hostile to capitalism. He implies that we can’t just label water a human right above the fray of the market without doing the same with food, clothes, . . . → Read More: A Puff of Absurdity: Water as a Human Right

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Roy Romanow writes about the dangers of focusing unduly on raw economic growth, rather than measuring our choices by how they actually affect people’s well-being: At the national level, the picture that emerges over the past 21 years is a GDP rebounding post-recession but Canadians literally continuing to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Thomas Piketty discusses our choice between developing models of global trade which actually produce positive results for people, or fueling the fire of Trump-style demogoguery: The main lesson for Europe and the world is clear: as a matter of urgency, globalization must be fundamentally re-oriented. The main challenges . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada after Trump: Harold Innis and What to Do When Empires Go Crazy

The Americans shocked the rest of the world by electing Donald Trump last Tuesday. Pierre Trudeau suggested that Canada’s proximity to the US was like “sleeping with an elephant”, and thus Canadians are particularly concerned about what this means.

Canada’s most preeminent political economist, Harold Innis, can offer some lessons. Innis is known for the . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Canada after Trump: Harold Innis and What to Do When Empires Go Crazy

The Disaffected Lib: A Question of Time We Don’t Have

The last line came with a jolt unexpected from a Guardian article:

At the risk of losing objectiveness but keeping candor, we are fucked. That from John Abraham, a professor of thermal sciences and a very busy climate monitor.

I admit that after Trump’s election victory, I secretly hoped and even though that his . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: A Question of Time We Don’t Have

Things Are Good: Celebrating Resiliency

The Rockefeller Foundation has produced a new documentary celebrating areas humans live in that are designed to be resilient to climate change. By building our cities and countries around the concept of resiliency we can better prepare for what’s ahead when it comes to unpredictable and extreme weather. It’s design thinking applied on a . . . → Read More: Things Are Good: Celebrating Resiliency

The Disaffected Lib: Our Miner’s Canary – the Arctic

Do you remember how balmy temperatures were in the high Arctic last winter? No? Well it’s a safe bet that most have probably forgotten all about it. That too is our new normal.

Conditions got so warm that a northern cyclone was spawned last December, thinning the sea ice by 4 inches.  Since the . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Our Miner’s Canary – the Arctic

Politics and its Discontents: Sadly, I Am Inclined To Agree With Sir David Attenborough

His logic seems impeccable:

Or, to put it another way:

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Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Arancha González Laya distinguishes between international trade and corporatism – arguing that we should be looking to ensure people benefit from the former by reining in the latter: Making trade more inclusive requires action on three broad policy fronts: trade rules, domestic social protection, and international cooperation to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

The Disaffected Lib: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words –

He’ll have a hard time backpedaling on his promise to kick start AmeriKa’s coal mines back into production. That probably begins by eviscerating the Environmental Protection Agency, perhaps getting rid of it altogether. There are plenty of industries that would like that.

Climate scientists look at AmeriKa’s president-elect and what they see is a . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: A Picture Worth a Thousand Words –

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Anthony Hilton writes that stronger protections for workers tend to increase productivity. And Fiona McQuarrie makes clear that we don’t have to settle for an economy where workers face constant fear and insecurity as a result of precarious work: (J)ob churn and precarious employment incur other costs. High . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Afternoon Links

The Disaffected Lib: Brace Yourself. This Is Hard to Take.

With all the endless political lipflap about keeping global warming under 2 degrees Celsius or 1.5C or 3C

In a paper in the journal Science Advances, [an international team of researchers] said the actual range could be between 4.78C to 7.36C by 2100, based on one set of calculations.

Professor Michael Mann, of Penn . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Brace Yourself. This Is Hard to Take.

The Disaffected Lib: Ever Heard of GMACCC?

Move over Sierra Club, here come the generals. It’s the Global Military Advisory Council on Climate Change, an organization made up of retired and serving military leaders.

They’ve got a message. Either the nations of the world start doing something meaningful and effective to arrest climate change, or – it’s war. The current chairman . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Ever Heard of GMACCC?

Politics and its Discontents: More From The Conservative Braintrust

Well, we know what an abomination Kellie Leitch is as a Conservative leadership hopeful, but what about Brad Trost?

The pool, it would seem, is very, very shallow:

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Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Brent Patterson criticizes the Libs’ short-sighted plans to privatize public services in lieu of any coherent economic policy. And Tom Parkin calls out their bait-and-switch approach to infrastructure.

– Robin McKie reports on Nicholas Stern’s recognition that his much-cited work on the impacts of climate change only . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Evening Links

PostArctica: Stand With Standing Rock – Montreal

Got down late and they had already started marching but I caught up with them on Saint Antoine as they were turning up Saint Alexandre.

Going to quote from the organizer’s Facebook page as I go along.

“Join us in a peaceful protest in solidarity with water defenders and frontline communities at Standing Rock, . . . → Read More: PostArctica: Stand With Standing Rock – Montreal

The Disaffected Lib: Wait, I’m Pretty Sure I Voted for Some of These People. Haven’t You?

Sorry, my bad. I was thinking of horses. These are plainly backbenchers.

There’s a proposal to levy carbon taxes on meat and dairy products. The photo shows the carbon emission apparatus.

Surcharges of 40% on beef and 20% on milk would account for the damage their production causes people via climate change, an Oxford . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Wait, I’m Pretty Sure I Voted for Some of These People. Haven’t You?

The Disaffected Lib: Four Out of Ten. Hey, That’s Still Less Than Half.

We know that as climate change steadily closes in around us, our resilience as communities, societies even as a civilization will be tested. Droughts, floods, severe storm events of increasing frequency, duration and intensity are already setting in.

Then there’s the environmental threat Maude Barlow warns is almost equally threatening as global warming, the global . . . → Read More: The Disaffected Lib: Four Out of Ten. Hey, That’s Still Less Than Half.