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Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Greg Jericho is the latest to weigh in on the false promises of neoliberalism:An article in the IMF’s latest issue of is journal Finance and Development notes that “instead of delivering growth, some neolibe… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Calgary Grit: The Census Returns!

Here’s what I wrote about the Census back in 2010:

The debate focuses on the long form. Those trying to axe the Census argue these questions are an invasion of privacy. “Why the hell should the government know what time I leave to go to work?” they shout angrily on their twitter accounts and in . . . → Read More: Calgary Grit: The Census Returns!

Accidental Deliberations: On ticking clocks

Governing inevitably involves a combination of setting the agenda to the extent possible, and responding to events to the extent necessary. And while there’s a great deal of doubt as to where the Libs’ priorities will lie, it’s possible to identify the areas where they’ll have little choice but to make decisions very quickly.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On ticking clocks

Montreal Simon: The Cons, the Census, and the Horrifying Story of Our Vanishing Canada

It's now been five years since the ghastly Tony Clement announced that the Cons were killing the long form census.Claiming that it was a gross invasion of privacy, and that they had been "flooded" with complaints.Which like all things Con turned out to be just another Big Lie. The Conservative government listened to only . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: The Cons, the Census, and the Horrifying Story of Our Vanishing Canada

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Michal Rozworski highlights the deeper economic issues which are receiving minimal attention compared to deficits and minor amounts of infrastructure spending in Canada’s federal election: In the long term, two decades of Liberal and Conservative austerity have left Canada with a revenue problem, rather than a spending problem.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Following his resounding win to become Labour’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn describes the proper role of government as a vehicle for shared benefits: We understand aspiration and we understand that it is only collectively that our aspirations can be realised.

Everybody aspires to an affordable home, a secure . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Howard Elliott writes about the need for senior levels of government to help address the housing needs facing Canadian communities. And the report from Saskatchewan’s advisory group on poverty reduction includes housing among its key priorities as well (while also favouring work on a basic income).

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– John Thornhill talks to Mariana Mazzucato about the importance of public investment in fostering economic growth – along with the need for the public to benefit as a result: As Mazzucato explains it, the traditional way of framing the debate about wealth creation is to picture the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Althia Raj, Karl Nerenberg, Tim Harper, Jennifer Ditchburn and Kristy Kirkup, Lee Berthiaume and Jason Fekete, PressProgress and CTV News all point out some of the more noteworthy aspects of Nigel Wright’s testimony in Mike Duffy’s trial (along with the large amount of material brought to light as . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– CBC follows up on the connection between childhood poverty and increased health-care costs later in life. And Sunny Freeman points out how the living wage planned by Rachel Notley’s NDP figures to benefit Alberta’s economy in general.

– Meanwhile, William Gardner laments our lack of accurate information on . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Alison picks up on Armine Yalnizyan’s important question as to whether the Cons have a Plan B other than hoping for factors beyond our control to boost oil prices. And Brad Delong argues that based on the foreseeable direction of our economy, we need a stronger public . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Armine Yalnizyan counters the Cons’ spin on tax-free savings accounts. And Rob Carrick points out that raising the limit on TFSAs would forfeit billions of desperately-needed dollars to benefit only the wealthiest few in Canada: TFSAs are Swiss army knives – a financial knife, corkscrew, screwdriver and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– John Hood discusses how the privilege of the political class makes it difficult for elected representatives to understand, let alone address, the problems of the precariat. And Lawrence Mishel and Will Kimball document the continued connection between the erosion of unions and income inequality.

– Lizzie Dearden reports . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Jim Stanford reminds us that any drama as to whether Canada’s budget will be balanced this year is entirely of the Cons’ own making through pointless tax slashing: Running spending cuts since 2011 now total more than $14-billion a year. Canadians experience real consequences from those cuts . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– The Globe and Mail reminds us why we should demand the restoration of an effective census, while Evidence for Democracy is making a public push toward that goal. And Tavia Grant discusses how the destruction of effective data collection is affecting Canadian workplace: Reliable, complete and up-to-date labour . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– The Star criticizes the Harper Cons’ selective interest in international cooperation – with war and oil interests apparently ranking as the only areas where the Cons can be bothered to work with other countries. And Catherine Porter reports that the Cons have demonstrated their actual attitude toward global . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Gerald Caplan suggests that Rogers and Bell might be ripe for nationalization – though it’s also worth pointing out that we don’t have to guess what happens when a Crown delivers telecommunications services: The British Labour Party has begun to make the case that market fundamentalism, or neoliberalism, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Calgary Grit: 10 Years of Blogging

Happy Trails

Back when I first sat down to rant about politics on May 15th 2004, I never expected I’d still be doing this over 3,000 posts later. The blog has outlasted 3 Liberal leaders, been through 4 federal elections, and documented my involvement on a handful of losing leadership campaigns. During that . . . → Read More: Calgary Grit: 10 Years of Blogging

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Robert Reich discusses the Koch brothers and their place in the U.S.’ new plutocracy: The Kochs exemplify a new reality that strikes at the heart of America. The vast wealth that has accumulated at the top of the American economy is not itself the problem. The problem is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Duncan Cameron writes that Stephen Harper’s CETA triumphalism may result in serious long-term damage to Canada for the sake of a temporary political reprieve: Promoting the big bamboozle means Harper is gambling with Canada’s economic future. The PM is touting a deal not yet finished. Making himself its . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Josh Eidelson and John Schmitt take a look at the guaranteed annual income which will be voted on in Switzerland – and the sole barrier to a similar discussion in the U.S. (and likely in Canada): What is a universal basic income, and why are we hearing more . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Alex Himelfarb and Jordan Himelfarb comment on Canada’s dangerously distorted conversation about public revenue and the purposes it can serve: As we argue in our new book, Tax Is Not a Four-Letter Word, the Canadian tax conversation has become dangerously distorted. Any reasonable discussion of taxes must take . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (iv)

Four professors involved in researching income inequality in Canada took a close look at the National Household Survey and what it appeared to tell us, and then put it into context.

According to the NHS, many of the census tracts where low-income people live have seen their average incomes rise, while the highest-income census tracts . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (iv)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Andrew Jackson discusses why attacks on Old Age Security – including the Fraser Institute’s calls for increased clawbacks – serve no useful purpose: The principled argument for not clawing back OAS benefits is that all seniors should be entitled to a bare-bones public pension as a basic building . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (iii): Collateral damage

I’m prepared to believe that when Tony Clement eliminated the manadatory long census form prior to the 2011 census, he didn’t actually intend to make rural communities in the western provinces disappear. After all, rural communities in the west would be a big part of the CPC’s base of support. But when you implement a . . . → Read More: Peace, order and good government, eh?: Mission accomplished (iii): Collateral damage