Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on this post about the Libs’ electoral reform betrayal – and the likelihood that it will encourage future Stephen Harpers to exploit the distortions created by first-past-the-post. For further reading…– I’ve linked to plenty of other commentary on the Libs’ broken promise here, here and here. And we can add new material from ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Claudia Chwalisz points out that in addition to relying on a distortionary electoral system, the Trudeau Libs’ majority was built on a bubble which now seems likely to pop. Michael Harris wagers that Canadians will remember the broken core promise when they go to the polls in ...

Accidental Deliberations: On creative reinterpretation

Shorter Bill Morneau: Pay no attention to trifles such as a “platform”. In fact, our only election promise was to draw up budget plans on the back of a napkin if given the opportunity. And promise kept!

Accidental Deliberations: This seems pertinent

In light of the Cons’ latest misleading ads, let’s take a quick stroll through the offence provisions of the Canada Elections Act: 480.1 Every person is guilty of an offence who, with intent to mislead, falsely represents themselves to be, or causes anyone to falsely represent themselves to be,(a) the Chief Electoral Officer, a member ...

Accidental Deliberations: On credibility blows

Presumably, at some point in the future, the Wildrose Party will run in another Alberta election campaign, with Derek Fildebrandt as one of its candidates. And plenty of us will have the popcorn ready to see how they try to explain their now-on-the-record belief that it’s somehow a betrayal – rather than a desirable state ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Yonatan Strauch and Thomas Homer-Dixon discuss how the Cons’ economic plans involve betting against our planet. And David Macdonald notes that the supposed reward for prioritizing oil profits over a sustainable future is to stagnate at recession-level employment rates. – James Bagnall documents the rise of inequality in ...

Accidental Deliberations: Lies and the lying liars who tell them

Ideally, this would be the end of the story when it comes to Stephen Harper’s callous and desperate attempt to claim the Terry Fox Foundation’s reputation for his own. But there’s reason for serious doubt that will happen – and indeed the Cons may end up treating the story as a case study in how ...

Accidental Deliberations: On questionable support

Shorter Stephen Harper: I only need to receive a single piece of correspondence from somebody to claim their permanent blanket endorsement of everything I might someday propose. Stay tuned for future policy announcements unveiled with the enthusiastic support of grade-school penpals, American Express, and multiple members of Nigeria’s royal family.

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Paul Weinberg discusses the need to focus on inequality in Canada’s federal election, while Scott Deveau and Jeremy Van Loon take note of the fact that increased tax revenue is on the table. The Star’s editorial board weighs in on the NDP’s sound and progressive fiscal plan. ...

Accidental Deliberations: Juxtaposition

Stephen Harper plays chess: Sources say Conservative planners did factor in testimony by Wright and Harper’s former legal counsel Perrin. Once the testimony was over, they calculated, the sting would fade, and those voters who were inclined to believe Harper’s version would continue to do so. Those who never believed him would never vote for ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Andrew Jackson discusses how increased development of the oil sands fits into Canada’s economic future – and how it’s foolhardy to assume that one necessarily equates to the other: A new and effective global climate agreement to avoid hitting the 2 degree increase would mandate a large, phased ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Michael Hiltzik discusses how corporate apologists are trying (but failing) to minimize the existence and importance of income inequality. Lawrence Martin notes that the rest of Canada’s economic indicators are similarly signalling that Conservative dogma is of absolutely no use in the real world. And Michael Geist observes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Tavia Grant is the latest to note that the potential for driverless vehicles necessitates some consideration as to how to account for people who currently rely on driving jobs. And Vivek Wadhwa makes the case for a new form of capitalism which isn’t designed to leave people behind: ...

Accidental Deliberations: On blissful ignorance

Shorter Lawrence Herman: Just because Newfoundland and Labrador learned the hard way that Stephen Harper can’t be trusted doesn’t mean it has any right to warn anybody else that Stephen Harper can’t be trusted. (For a more reasonable take on how we should expect countries to react to the Cons’ duplicitous negotiations and undue preference ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne discusses how we can bring about change in the new year by demanding that our political leaders recognize and use the power of collective action: Social justice requires a collective response and political action. It is at the root of wonderful nation-building programs like universal health ...

Accidental Deliberations: On inconsistent statements

Shorter Leona Aglukkaq: It’s libellous to suggest that I privately demanded that Sam Tutanuak apologize for exposing the fact that my constituents are going hungry. But while I have your attention, I may as well take the opportunity to publicly demand that Sam Tutanuak apologize for exposing the fact that my constituents are going hungry.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Natasha Luckhardt examines what we can expect from Burger King’s takeover of Tim Hortons – and the news isn’t good for Canadian workers and citizens alike. But Jim Stanford reminds us that we’re not without some public policy options by following up on the employment effects of an ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Matthew O’Brien is the latest to pick up on the connection between pre-transfer income equality, redistribution and sustainable economic growth: Redistribution overall helps, and at least doesn’t harm, growth spells. That’s because the positive effects of less inequality add to or offset the negligible, or negative, effects of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Alison and PressProgress both discuss how Brad Butt’s attempt to defend voter suppression is based on what even he had to concede was nothing short of legislative fraud. And Stephen Maher notes that the Cons’ unilateral rewrite of election rules figures to force Elections Canada to cover ...

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the link between personality politics and the culture of scandal that’s developed around Stephen Harper, Rob Ford and other political figures. For further reading…– Once again, Dan Leger and Leslie MacKinnon provide the column’s starting point in discussing the central focus on scandals in 2013.– Eric Grenier’s year-end political grades offer a prime ...

Accidental Deliberations: Fool me twice

Andrew Coyne has a suggestion as to how the Cons might extort some increased adherence to free-market fundamentalism from the provinces: It’s the balance between spending and revenues, not just the totals, that matters. The federal government, as the PBO numbers show, will have substantial fiscal “room,” revenues in excess of what it needs to ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Charles Campbell discusses Robert Reich’s work to highlight the importance of a fair and progressive tax system. And while Lawrence Martin is right to lament the systematic destruction of Canada’s public revenue streams under the Libs and Cons alike, his fatalistic view that nobody can stem the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Paul Krugman writes about the right-wing belief that “freedom’s just another word for not enough to eat”: (Y)ou might think that ensuring adequate nutrition for children, which is a large part of what SNAP does, actually makes it less, not more likely that those children will be poor ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Paul Kershaw highlights what’s most needed to support Canada’s younger generations: Even with all this personal adaptation, most in Gen X and Y can’t work their way out of the time and income squeeze when they start families. Since two earners bring home little more today than ...

Accidental Deliberations: On patterns of behaviour

Sure, it’s tempting to treat Pamela Wallin’s role as a director of a failed oil sands firm as a personal commentary on the Cons and their Senate appointees. But the story is far more closely connected to another theme that’s popping up in news stories on a daily basis. There’s ample question as to how ...