Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on the Libs’ pleasantly surprising hints toward enforcing the Canada Health Act – and the Saskatchewan Party’s response that it would rather fight for profit-motivated medicine than work on building a sustainable universal system. For further reading…– By way of background on the enforcement of the Canada Health Act at the federal level, see ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Sherri Torjman discusses how the the gig economy is based mostly on evading protections for workers – and how the both employment law and social programs need to catch up: Much of the labour market is morphing into freelance or gigs. More and more Canadians are becoming ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Caroline Plante reports on Quebec’s scourge of medical extra-billing and user fees (as identified by its own Auditor General). And Aaron Derfel notes that the federal government has done nothing to apply the Canada Health Act to rein in the practice. – Erika Shaker highlights how federal funding ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – CBC and the Star have both started reporting on the Panama Papers – offering a glimpse of the tip of the iceberg of international tax avoidance. And the Star also recognizes why we shouldn’t let grey-area tax scheming pass without appropriate scrutiny, while Canadians for Tax Fairness reminds ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Ryan Meili writes that the spread of for-profit corporate medicine – including through the Saskatchewan Party’s privatization of care – demonstrates the need for enforcement of the Canada Health Act. And the Star makes the case for mandatory disclosure of drug companies’ payments to doctors to promote their ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Linda Tirado writes that whatever the language used as an excuse for turning public benefits into private profits, we should know better than to consider it credible: Given how much I had heard my whole life about British dignity, and the fact that there is a thing ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom takes a broad look at the problems with the Trans-Pacific Partnership, while noting that the Trudeau Libs don’t seem inclined to address them at all. Deirdre Fulton sees the final text as being worse than anybody suspected based even on the previous leaked drafts. Doctors Without ...

Facing Autism in New Brunswick: Mr. Mulcair Will the NDP Negotiate A New Health Accord to Include ABA for Autism Under Medicare?

September 30, 2015 Thomas Mulcair  Leader of the Official Opposition Dear Mr Mulcair The Federal NDP has in the past been very helpful in addressing autism on a national level including efforts by Nova Scotia MP Peter Stoffer who worked with the late Fredericton Liberal MP Andy Scott to effect passage of a National Autism ...

Facing Autism in New Brunswick: Mr. Mulcair Will the NDP Negotiate A New Health Accord to Include ABA for Autism Under Medicare?

September 30, 2015 Thomas Mulcair  Leader of the Official Opposition Dear Mr Mulcair The Federal NDP has in the past been very helpful in addressing autism on a national level including efforts by Nova Scotia MP Peter Stoffer who worked with the late Fredericton Liberal MP Andy Scott to effect passage of a National Autism ...

Facing Autism in New Brunswick: Fredericton NDP Sharon Scott-Levesque Supports ABA Coverage For Autism Under A New Canada Health Act Accord

Hello Harold, I wish to thank you for your message regarding the inclusion of Applied Behaviour Analysis in Medicare. As you have noted, this is an issue affecting a growing number of Canadian families, and I understand the high costs of treatment are of great concern. As you know the Canada Health Act requires provinces to ...

Facing Autism in New Brunswick: Fredericton NDP Sharon Scott-Levesque Supports ABA Coverage For Autism Under A New Canada Health Act Accord

Hello Harold, I wish to thank you for your message regarding the inclusion of Applied Behaviour Analysis in Medicare. As you have noted, this is an issue affecting a growing number of Canadian families, and I understand the high costs of treatment are of great concern. As you know the Canada Health Act requires provinces to ...

Alberta Politics: Medical transport is an essential service, and properly so – it’s time to start treating it like one

PHOTOS: Medical air transport – an essential service too important to be left to private insurers and their ilk. Below: Amy and Amelia Savill (CTV News) and Alberta Health spokesperson Timothy Wilson (Linkedin). So now we need to buy medical-travel insurance when we travel inside Canada? Who knew? Certainly not Amy Savill of High Prairie, ...

Politics Canada: Why Harper doesn’t tell Canadians what he’s doing

Stephen Harper has done many things since becoming the worst prime minister in Canadian history.  One of the main difficulties I have his willingness to take actions that he has never discussed, or won a mandate for from the electorate. If he wishes to make a case for privatized health care in place of our ...

Accidental Deliberations: On healthy proposals

Paul Wells seems quite disappointed not to have received more attention for his recent piece on Thomas Mulcair’s speech to the Canadian Medical Association. So let’s take a closer look at why the angle Wells took didn’t seem like much of a revelation – and what might be more significant in Mulcair’s plans. At the ...

Montreal Simon: Stephen Harper and the Battle to Save Medicare

It was good to see Canadians out in the streets across the country today, sending a loud message to Stephen Harper:Take your grubby paws off our medicare system. On the day the Canada Health Accord died. Read more »

Montreal Simon: Stephen Harper and the Con War on Medicare

He has waited a long time to make his move. From the day he was first elected with the support of a group that was founded to kill medicare.He had to restrain himself for so many years. But it was always going to be the biggest, bloodiest, and most prized trophy in his skull rack.The ...

The Canadian Progressive: BC’s wheelchair fee for seniors in long-term care facilities not fair: Researcher

Janine Farrell, a seniors care researcher at the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, explains why the recently announced $25/month user fee for wheelchairs used by people in long-term care facilities in BC is not fair. The post BC’s wheelchair fee for seniors in long-term care facilities not fair: Researcher appeared first on The Canadian Progressive.

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Arthur Haberman argues that our universal public health care system helps contribute to a more democratic society: There is something that political philosophers — those like Tocqueville and Mill in the 19th century — have come to call living democratically. By this it is meant that voting is ...

Facing Autism Symptoms in New Brunswick: Medicare’s Orphans: Jean Lewis On The Struggle for Autism Treatment In Canada

The video and clip below are from the Medicare for Autism Now web site and feature MFAN co-founder Jean Lewis, one of Canada’s foremost autism advocates, providing an articulate, personally informed summary of the struggle for autism treatment in Canada.   Jean keeps the discussion on a non-partisan level and discusses the fight to end ...

Alberta Diary: Inquiry testimony suggests pricey private clinics – nudge-nudge, wink-wink – really can engineer preferential access

Wheeling and dealing: Staff of private clinics use advanced clinical techniques to decide which patients go to the front of the line for quick medical tests. Alberta medical insiders may not appear exactly as illustrated. Below: Retired judge John Vertes, Alberta Health Minister Fred Horne. What appears to be the first confirmed example of methodical ...

Alberta Diary: Raj Sherman must’ve nailed it, or Fred Horne would’ve walked from talks with docs

CBC investigative journalist Charles Rusnell goes through Alberta Health Services expense accounts in the upcoming motion picture, All the Premier’s Relatives. Rusnell is played by actor Robert Redford, no relation. Don’t worry, people, I just made that up. But who could resist? Below: Dr. Raj Sherman, the Liberalberta leader, played by himself, and AMA President ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Barrie McKenna discusses the cost of public-private partnerships: Disturbing new research highlights some serious flaws in how governments tally the benefits of public-private partnerships versus conventional projects. Too little is known about how these contracts work, who benefits and who pays. This week, public-private partnerships will take centre ...

False positive: private profit in Canada's health care: Canada Health Act used in Zombie Defence of For-Profit Health Care

Andrew Duffy, in an article syndicated by Postmedia, made the logical equivalent of mixing metaphors when he used the Canada Health Act (CHA) to legitimize the use of private clinics. The result, as with mixed metaphors, is a “head-scratching” argument in favour of Centric’s takeover of the Shouldice Clinic. Duffy uses a confidential government manual ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to end your week. – Dan Gardner nicely sums up how any Con cabinet shuffles are utterly irrelevant since Stephen Harper prefers ciphers to functional ministers in any event: In the past, parties in power always had factions, and ministers with their own political clout, and these provided at least a modest check ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Roy Romanow comments on Medicare as a major part of Canada’s identity: The achievement of universal health care took a long, acrimonious and protracted road. It is no surprise to me that Saskatchewan was at the forefront of this journey. The province’s citizens learned many hard lessons ...