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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Roy Romanow writes about the dangers of focusing unduly on raw economic growth, rather than measuring our choices by how they actually affect people’s well-being: At the national level, the picture that emerges over the past 21 years is a GDP rebounding post-recession but Canadians literally continuing to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Cowichan Conversations: Alistair MacGregor Tables Bill To Limit Federal Election Period

Alistair MacGregor OTTAWA- Alistair MacGregor, Member of Parliament for Cowichan—Malahat—Langford, introduced a bill today to ensure that governments cannot set an election period longer than 46 days in order to spend more money. This Read more… . . . → Read More: Cowichan Conversations: Alistair MacGregor Tables Bill To Limit Federal Election Period

Accidental Deliberations: Up for discussion

Kady O’Malley has already highlighted a few of the noteworthy resolutions (PDF) submitted to this weekend’s NDP policy convention. But I’ll point out a few more which look to me to deserve attention.First, in the category of simple good ideas regardles… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Up for discussion

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Ed Miliband offers his take on inequality and the political steps needed to combat it:(T)he terms of the case against inequality have changed. I have always believed that inequality divides people, deprives ma… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On turnout

Daniel Schwartz reports on the final vote count from last month’s federal election. And given the record vote total and unusually high turnout based on the percentage of eligible voters, it’s particularly worth noting what’s changed since previous, lower-turnout elections.

Since 2011, the Conservatives eliminated the per-vote subsidy, which provided political parties with a direct . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On turnout

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Robyn Benson rightly argues that it’s long past time for the Harper Cons to be booted from office. Stuart Trew sets out just five of the worst ways in which the Cons have changed Canada, while Murray Dobbin offers his take on what we’ll need to do . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: This seems pertinent

In light of the Cons’ latest misleading ads, let’s take a quick stroll through the offence provisions of the Canada Elections Act: 480.1 Every person is guilty of an offence who, with intent to mislead, falsely represents themselves to be, or causes anyone to falsely represent themselves to be,(a) the Chief Electoral Officer, a member . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: This seems pertinent

Accidental Deliberations: On final choices

Following up on this post and some additional discussion, let’s take a look at the question of what options would be available to Stephen Harper if he decided he wanted to escape a drubbing at the polls by cancelling the federal election. And fortunately, the answer looks to be “not much”.

The Canada Elections Act . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On final choices

Accidental Deliberations: On acceptable surprises

When Alice Funke first identified the effect of an extended writ period under the Cons’ well-hidden revisions to the Canada Elections Act, I mused the effect was less problematic than it appeared at first glance. But now that the possibility of an extra-long campaign looks fairly real and the issue is drawing more discussion, let’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On acceptable surprises

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, following up on these posts about the possibility the Cons might decide to ignore their own fixed election date and delay the election expected for October 19. 

For further reading…

– The Canada Elections Act is here. And for an interesting comparison, see Saskatchewan’s fixed election date provision from the Legislative Assembly Act, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: On half measures

Having written this column a couple of weeks back on electoral financing in Saskatchewan, I’ll take a moment to address this letter to the editor in response from R. Curtis Mullen.

It’s indeed true that Saskatchewan has spending limits which apply during an election campaign. But the Canada Elections Act does in fact regulate both . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On half measures

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Elias Isquith talks to David Madland about the connection between increasing inequality and the breakdown of trust in the U.S. political system. CBC and Larry Elliott follow up on the IMF’s findings about the economic damage done by income and wealth disparities. And Philip Longman thoroughly examines the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Sean McElwee examines new evidence of the deliberate choice of past U.S. governments dating back to Ronald Reagan to completely discount the policy preferences of anybody but the rich: In a new book, political scientists James Druckman and Lawrence Jacobs examine data on internal polling from U.S. . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Sean McElwee offers a new set of evidence that the right-wing Republicans who run on the economy in fact do it nothing but harm. And David Dayen discusses how Bernie Sanders may be able to push the U.S.’ policy discussion into a far more positive area by forcing . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Scott Sinclair studies the effect of NAFTA on government policies, and finds that it’s been used primarily (and all too frequently) to attack Canadian policy choices: A study released today by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) finds over 70% of all NAFTA investor-state claims since . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Monica Pohlmann interviews Armine Yalnizyan about the undue influence of our corporate overlords in setting public policy: What’s your sense of the state of our democracy?

We have a troubled relationship with our democratic institutions. We need to get over the idea that government is something and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On corporate takeovers

CTV reports on the funnelling of money from SNC-Lavalin into the Cons’ coffers. And we shouldn’t be surprised to see that connection in light of the Cons’ attitude toward corporate wrongdoing.

But it’s especially worth noting what’s missing from the Cons’ denials of involvement: Elections Canada records reveal that 10 top SNC-Lavalin managers and their . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On corporate takeovers

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Adam Lent highlights the strong majority of respondents in the UK who see the political system as serving the powerful rather than the public. And Elizabeth Warren explains why the same conclusion applies in the U.S., while making the case that there’s room to improve matters simply . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Rick Salutin discusses how corruption has become endemic in the global economy as an inevitable consequence of me-first values: You wouldn’t have those CEO pig-outs absent neo-liberalism’s moral model: get rich not just quick but hugely. As Kevin O’Leary loves saying, and CBC plasters on its promos: God . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– The Globe and Mail joins the chorus calling for Canada to welcome more citizens, rather than exploiting cheap and disposable workers. But Bill Curry reports on yet another corporate lobby group demanding that the Cons actually expand the flow of temporary labour to secure profits at the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Jim Stanford writes that Tim Hudak’s combination of austerity and indiscriminate tax slashing represents a recipe for less jobs rather than more: Mr. Hudak’s initial policy agenda is mostly a recycled business wish list: cut taxes, cut regulations, pay for training, cut energy costs, free trade.  Its logic . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Linda McQuaig discusses how the interests of big banks ended the Cons’ willingness to consider postal banking which would produce both better service and more profits for the public: (C)ompetition is the last thing the banks want. And given their power (straddling the very heart of the Canadian . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: On skewed perspectives

Shorter anonymous Conservative MP: Of course we want nothing more than fairness out of Canada’s electoral oversight bodies. And by that, we of course mean they should stop damaging our party’s cause with this annoying habit of investigating Conservative wrongdoing.

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Joshua Holland writes that for all the social and cultural factors contribution to U.S. sickness and death, inequality ranks at the top of the list: Here in the United States, our high level of income inequality corresponds with 883, 914 unnecessary deaths each year. More specifically, the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.

– Alex Himelfarb and Jordan Himelfarb comment on the dangers of failing to talk about taxes: The tax debate is often muddied by disagreement about whether taxes have actually gone up or down. As the economy grows, so too do tax revenues and spending, which is why many (though . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links