Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Bruce Campbell points out how Donald Trump’s blind hatred toward any type of regulation can impose costs in Canada and elsewhere to the extent we’re bound by trade deals which make “harmonization” an expected standard. And Pia Eberhardt recognizes that there’s no point in locking ourselves into the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Hassan Yussuff and other labour leaders offer their take on how we can develop a more equitable global trade system: The next challenge before us is to build on and improve all post-CETA trade and investment deals to ensure they meet a progressive trade model. We suggest several ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – George Monbiot discusses how neoliberal ideology has managed to take over as the default assumption in global governance – despite its disastrous and readily visible effects: (T)he past four decades have been characterised by a transfer of wealth not only from the poor to the rich, but within ...

Alberta Politics: Fate of Canadian Wheat Board a disturbing harbinger for Canada’s dairy, poultry and egg farmers

PHOTOS: Tractors in the streets of Ottawa on Tuesday, their drivers protesting the Harper Conservatives’ barely concealed plans to destroy the supply-management agricultural sector. (Grabbed from @amkfoote on Twitter.) Below: Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and CCPA economist Bruce Campbell. GRANDE PRAIRIE, Alberta With the farmer-owned Canadian Wheat Board gutted by legislation ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Elias Isquith interviews Mark Blyth about his book on the disastrous consequences of austerity, while Paul Krugman writes that austerity is particularly sure to cause economic destruction when combined with a push toward consumer deleveraging. And Bruce Campbell looks to Syriza as an example of how people ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – John Abraham and Dana Nuccitelli discuss the worrisome spread of climate change denialism, particularly around the English-speaking developed world. But lest we accept the theory that declining public knowledge is independent of political choices, Margaret Munro reports that the Cons are suppressing factual scientific information about Arctic ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Jared Bernstein discusses how fair and progressive taxes on the rich are a necessary element of any effort to improve the lot of the poor: The rising tide of inequality does more than create great economic distance between income classes. It also produces higher barriers to mobility. Increased ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Jonathan Freedland discusses how the UK’s Conservative government is forcing its poor citizens to choose between food and dignity: Cameron’s statement rests on the repeatedly implied assumption that the only people going hungry are those who have opted for idleness as a lifestyle choice, who could work but ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dan Leger and Leslie MacKinnon both theorize that 2013 represented a new low in Canadian politics. But while the Cons may have taken some new steps in petty scandals and cover-ups (and Rob Ford’s clown show managed to attract an unusual amount of attention), I’m not sure ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

This and that to end your week. – Bruce Campbell argues that Alberta should take a lesson from Norway on how to manage natural resources – and plenty of other provinces could stand to take notes as well: The Norwegian government owns 80 per cent of petroleum production, and retains roughly 85 per cent of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content for your Friday reading. – Michael Harris neatly sums up the Harper Cons’ legacy: In many ways, the Harper legacy will come down to this: how much can he get away with? Incumbency furnishes a speedy getaway car. From a legislative perspective, Harper might as well be King Tut. He can do whatever ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – I’ll very much hope Chantal Hebert is wrong in her conclusion that Canadians are getting ever more doubtful as to whether change is possible through the ballot box. But one can’t much argue with her take on why that perception might be developing: In the national capital, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to start your week… – Remember the Cons’ talking point that we should assume all of the Robocon calls which purported to come from Lib candidates could safely be said to have come from that source? Because Glen McGregor and Stephen Maher just shot a massive hole in the claim, finding that the ...