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Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, comparing the Conservative Party’s leadership race based on fear and division to the NDP’s which looks set to bring a progressive coalition together.

For further reading…– Bob Hepburn also notes that fear and hatred are the main themes emerging from the Cons’ candidates so far. And while it’s fair enough for Andrew Coyne to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: On transitions

Bob Hepburn makes clear that while the Libs may still be in denial about the importance of cooperating to remove the Harper Cons from power, their best friends in the media are under no such illusions. But the most noteworthy contribution to Canada’s discussion about post-election options comes from Aaron Wherry – particularly in highlighting . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On transitions

Accidental Deliberations: On separation anxieties

Following up on this post, let’s take a look at the first of Bob Hepburn’s theorized lines of attack against the NDP – which gets its own separate post since it needs to be analyzed in radically different ways depending on the party who launches it: Worse, the Conservatives are expected to unleash a furious . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On separation anxieties

Accidental Deliberations: On messaging tests

Following up on yesterday’s post, I’ll make clear that nobody should hold any illusions that the NDP’s opponents will abandon their own efforts to pursue seats simply because the NDP holds a strong position for the moment. And on that front, Bob Hepburn floats a few trial balloons as to messages which the NDP’s opponents . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: On messaging tests

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Citizens for Public Justice provides a useful set of fact sheets on the importance of tax revenues in funding a civilized society. And Daphne Bramham follows up with a look at what we’ve lost from tax cuts – and the public demand for more tax fairness: Tax cuts . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– In advance of this weekend’s Progress Summit, Robin Sears comments on the significance of the Broadbent Institute and other think tanks in shaping policy options: The Center for American Progress was the wakeup call for progressives around the world. Independent-minded, massively funded, deeply professional, it was created . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– James Baxter discusses why there’s no reason to buy into the Harper Cons’ fearmongering in the first place: Let’s accept a basic truth: There’s only so much money we’re willing to ‘invest’ in having the government to protect us from bad things and, when you get out of bed in . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Oliver Milman reports on research showing how humanity is destroying its own environmental life support systems. And our appetite for exploitation is proving a failure even from the standpoint of the pursuit of shortsighted greed, as David Dayen considers how the recent drop in oil prices – and . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Evening Links

Politics and its Discontents: Toward Democratic Renewal

I’m sure that all progressive bloggers are disheartened and bedeviled by the devolution of democracy in Canada. Not only has it been under consistent and sustained attack by the Harper regime, but it has also (perhaps as a result of those attacks) seen a substantial rise in the number of disaffected and disengaged citizens, . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: Toward Democratic Renewal

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your Sunday reading.

– Joan Walsh discusses Elizabeth Warren’s work on improving wages and enhancing the strength of workers in the U.S., while Jeremy Nuttall interviews Hassan Yussuff about the labour movement’s work to elect a better government in Canada.

– Bob Hepburn argues that getting rid of the Harper Cons is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Politics and its Discontents: More Than Rhetorical Questions

In today’s Star, Bob Hepburn has a piece that should be read by anyone who needs a brief refresher course in some of the more egregious attacks against democracy perpetrated by Stephen Harper. I offer only a short overview of the article here, as I hope everyone will read the original in its entirety: . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: More Than Rhetorical Questions

OPSEU Diablogue: New minister, same tired denials about cuts

Dr. Eric Hoskins may be signing his name, but the latest Toronto Star letter-to-the-editor from the Health Minister sounds as tired and exasperated as those served up by his predecessor. Given Ministers seldom pen their own letters, we conclude it … Continue reading →

OPSEU Diablogue: Action Plan Year 2: Progress report more politics than substance

Reflecting on two years of “progress” under Ontario’s Health Action Plan, Health Minister Deb Matthews published her list of “accomplishments” in an on-line pamphlet posted in January. After two years there’s not a lot to show. Some of the list … Continue reading →

OPSEU Diablogue: CCACs not entirely to blame for high home care administrative costs

What to do with the Community Care Access Centres? Yesterday’s Toronto Star column by Bob Hepburn suggests we should roll them into the Local Health Integration Networks and send the CCAC CEOs packing. The urge to spank the CCAC board … Continue reading →

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Bob Hepburn writes that more Canadians approve of the idea of a guaranteed annual income than oppose it – even as the concept is all too frequently dismissed as politically unpalatable. And Stuart Trew points out that a majority of Canadians disagree with the corporate super-rights contained in . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Glen Hodgson and Brenda Lafleur explain how Canada’s lower and middle classes alike have been left out of any economic growth as a result of increased inequality: We believe the more accurate interpretation is that after worsening in the 1980s and 1990s, income inequality and poverty in Canada . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Arthur Haberman argues that our universal public health care system helps contribute to a more democratic society: There is something that political philosophers — those like Tocqueville and Mill in the 19th century — have come to call living democratically. By this it is meant that voting is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: The Dominoes of Democracy – Part 2

What is one of the chief effects of the Harper regime’s preference for an ideologically-based policy model over one premised on logic, facts and empirical evidence, as explored in my earlier post? The decline, perhaps even the demise, of a healthy democracy in which citizens are engaged and informed participants, thereby allowing an . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The Dominoes of Democracy – Part 2

Politics and its Discontents: The Dominoes of Democracy – Part 2

What is one of the chief effects of the Harper regime’s preference for an ideologically-based policy model over one premised on logic, facts and empirical evidence, as explored in my earlier post? The decline, perhaps even the demise, of a healthy democracy in which citizens are engaged and informed participants, thereby allowing an . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The Dominoes of Democracy – Part 2

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, building off of my previous analysis on the current positioning of Canada’s federal parties.

For further reading, see:– Bob Hepburn and Carol Goar on the purpose and effect of attack ads in general; and– Andrew Coyne on the Cons’ particular brand of personal attack, featuring some suggestions to reduce the amount of negative advertising.

. . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Politics and its Discontents: The Scourge of the Undead

While there was much talk in the House of Commons yesterday about how to prevent a ‘zombie apocalypse,’ in Canada, Bob Hepburn has his own solution on how to deal with the scourge of the undead: hold a referendum on abolishing the Senate.

Noting that it costs well over $100 million a year . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The Scourge of the Undead

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Steven Hoffman highlights the Cons’ utter refusal to recognize that foreign aid – as defined by global treaties – doesn’t mean the same thing as corporate giveaways: Reports and commentary on Canada’s new foreign aid policy reveal the extent to which international development means different things to different . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Politics and its Discontents: The Perilous State of Democracy in Canada

Over the past year I have written several posts on the woeful state of democratic participation in Canada, a state I am convinced is at least in significant part due to the debasement of our traditions engineered by the Harper regime. Contempt of Par… . . . → Read More: Politics and its Discontents: The Perilous State of Democracy in Canada

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Rick Salutin offers an important take on the U.S. election by pointing out that the Occupy movement and its focus on inequality laid the groundwork for Barack Obama’s re-election:The aftermath to the bailouts was the… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Ish Theilheimer highlights why the corporate right is so eager to snuff out organized labour – and why progressives need to fight back: Since the 1980s under Reagan, US Republicans have worked to “de-fund the Left,” going after advocacy groups, university student councils, progressive lawyers and legal . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links