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Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Friday Musical Interlude – Sonata No. 7 in D Major Op. 10

Ludwig van Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 7 in D major, Op. 10, No. 3, was dedicated to the Countess Anne Margarete von Browne, and written in 1798. This makes it contemporary with his three string trios of opus 9, the violin sonatas of opus 12 and the violin romance that became his opus 50 when later published. (The year also saw the premiere of a revised version of his second piano concerto, whose original form had been written and heard in 1795.[1])

It is divided into four movements:

Presto – cut time Largo e mesto – 6/8 (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Friday Musical Interlude – Beethoven, Violin Sonata No.8, 1st Movement.

For many classical music lovers, Beethoven’s eighth violin sonata lives in the long, fiery shadow of the ninth, better known as the “Kreutzer”. This is easy to understand, as the Kreutzer is a prime example of the stormy side of Beethoven—the one many listeners see as his most exciting and revealing trait. However, just as his eighth symphony is the kinder, gentler companion to his towering, formidable ninth, the eighth violin sonata, shorter and less aggressive than the ninth, shows a more lyrical side of Beethoven.

Filed under: Music Tagged: Beethoven, The DWR Friday Musical Interlude, Violin Sonata (Read more…)

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Friday Classical Music Interlude – Following the Ninth

Bill Moyers introduces a film that I, very much, want to see. Watch as Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony travels the globe and what it means to people and societies.

 

Filed under: Music Tagged: Beethoven, Following the Ninth, The DWR Friday Musical Interlude

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Friday Musical Interlude – Beethoven, Kreutzer Sonata, Finale (opus 47, violin, A major)

The sonata was originally dedicated to the violinist George Bridgetower (1778–1860), who performed it with Beethoven at the premiere on 24 May 1803 at the Augarten Theatre at a concert that started at the unusually early hour of 8:00 am. Bridgetower sight-read the sonata; he had never seen the work before, and there had been no time for any rehearsal. However, research indicates that after the performance, while the two were drinking, Bridgetower insulted the morals of a woman whom Beethoven cherished. Enraged, Beethoven removed the dedication of the piece, dedicating it instead to Rodolphe Kreutzer, who was considered the

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Dead Wild Roses: You made it. Happy New Year.

It doesn’t matter who you are. You gave your best, your worst and everything in between. Congratulate yourself for making it to here, prevailing or failing with your challenges. It doesn’t matter who you are. You are a worthy person and deserve to celebrate this one time, this one milestone of a thousand milestones.

Celebrate with me. For jocundity, for exultation, for the sheer epic magnitude of emotion expressed in the music of Beethoven. Prepare happily for Cry, Rinse and Repeat. Feel what unbounded joy is like through his music. Know

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350 or bust: Saturday At The Movies

This flashmob demonstrates that even banks can be agents of building community, if they chose to. The English translation of the Spanish description is: On the 130 th anniversary of the creation of Banco Sabadell we wanted to pay tribute to our city with the campaign “Som Sabadell.” This is the flashmob done as a [...]

Dead Wild Roses: The DWR Friday Classical Music Interlude – Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major, Op. 73

Almost posted the 9th again. Whoops.

The concerto is divided into three movements:

Allegro in E-flat major Adagio un poco mosso in B major Rondo: Allegro ma non troppo in E-flat major

As with Beethoven’s other concertos from this time period, this work has a relatively long first movement. (At twenty-five minutes, the Violin Concerto has the longest; Piano Concerto Nos. 4 and 5 each have opening movements of about twenty minutes.)

I. Allegro

The main theme of the first movement.

The piece begins with three full orchestra chords, each followed by a short cadenza

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