Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Eric Morath points out that a job (or even multiple jobs) can’t be taken as an assurance that a person can avoid relying on income supports and other social programs. PressProgress offers some important takeaways from the Canadian Labour Congress’ study of the low-wage workers. Angella MacEwen writes ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Jack Peat argues for trickle-up economics to ensure that everybody shares in our common resources (while also encouraging economic development): Good capitalism is the ability to promote incentives and opportunity in equal measure. Sway too far one way and the potential of human capital is stifled, sway ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading. – Scott Sinclair discusses how CETA could create extreme and unnecessary risk in Canada’s banking and financial system: The failure of a single company (such as Lehman Brothers in October 2008) or unchecked growth in markets for high-risk financial products (such as sub-prime mortgages) can quickly cascade out ...

A Different Point of View....: Business journalists go on the attack; demonize Atlantic seasonal workers

National business journalists and columnists have bought into Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s demeaning view that folks in the Atlantic region are backward and have a defeatist attitude. Framed in disrespectful language, they’re promoting untested economic ideas that, if adopted, would seriously damage the economy – and the people – of the region. Apparently it wasn’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Linda McQuaig tears into the Cons for exacerbating the gap between the too-rich-to-pay-taxes class and the rest of us: Ordinary citizens diligently spend hours calculating their income and deductions and meticulously filling out forms, fearful of the probing eye and relentless reach of the tax man. At ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Ruy Teixeira discusses Branko Milanovic’s finding that on a global scale, income inequality is almost entirely locked in based on an individual’s place of birth and parents’ income: Milanovic asks “How much of your income is determined at birth?”  The answer: 80 percent of your income can ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

This and that to end your week. – Bruce Campbell argues that Alberta should take a lesson from Norway on how to manage natural resources – and plenty of other provinces could stand to take notes as well: The Norwegian government owns 80 per cent of petroleum production, and retains roughly 85 per cent of ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Barbara Yaffe lets Hugh Segal make the case for a guaranteed annual income to end poverty in Canada: (Hugh Segal) says it could be arranged by way of a tax credit through the income tax system, to top up income of anyone falling below Statistics Canada’s Low ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Afternoon Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Pat Atkinson discusses the need to make sure that Saskatchewan’s boom-time spending actually sets us up for long-term prosperity, rather than fiscal disaster: Even though the OECD report, the burgeoning federal government deficit, China’s economic slowdown and America’s political deadlock all advise us that now is the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading. – Naomi Klein comments on how disaster capitalists have tried to turn Hurricane Sandy into a quick buck, while pointing out that there’s a far more rational public policy response available: The prize for shameless disaster capitalism, however, surely goes to rightwing economist Russell S Sobel, writing in a ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Barbara Yaffe writes about the continual rise in food bank use and the underlying political choices which have brought it about: (I)n the last decade food banks have been helping Canadians through both good times and bad. Doubtless, the latest food bank numbers, at least in part, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Yes, it’s alarming that the Cons are eliminating environmental assessments on a huge number of projects. But even more worrisome is the complete lack of a connection between the basis for the exclusion and the possible environmental impacts: Ottawa is also walking away from conducting assessments on various ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Robyn Allan notes that there’s plenty of weakness in Christy Clark’s position on the Gateway pipeline. But Barbara Yaffe writes that Clark has little choice but to stick to at least the requests she’s made so far – and Vaughn Palmer points out that those alone may ...

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your weekend. – Will Hutton discusses how the increasing gaps in economic equality are leading to radical differences in opportunity – with the U.S./U.K. push toward private schooling serving as a particular source of exclusion: (T)he middle class of whatever ethnic background is spending more on what Putnam calls its children’s ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Barbara Yaffe discusses Thomas Mulcair’s strong start in winning over B.C. voters. And Martin Regg Cohn notes that Stephen Harper is starting to face some real (and needed) pressure from Darrell Dexter and other premiers to start actually talking to the provinces, rather than retreating from shared ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Roy Romanow comments on Medicare as a major part of Canada’s identity: The achievement of universal health care took a long, acrimonious and protracted road. It is no surprise to me that Saskatchewan was at the forefront of this journey. The province’s citizens learned many hard lessons ...

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week. – Miles Corak comments on how inequality undercuts social mobility. And Joseph Stiglitz highlights the fact that the vast majority of people hold a strong interest in not having their path to a secure and successful life blocked by a wall of upper-class money. – If there’s anything the ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Tim Harper gets somewhat closer to the mark than most pundits in recognizing that any talk an NDP/Lib merger is neither timely nor particularly well-placed. But the “one more time” message is a little bit off: again, we’ve still run precisely zero election campaigns in which the NDP ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – In the last couple of days’ worth of developments on Robocon, the Cons defaulted to their standard setting of admitting nothing and misleading about everything – though it’s hard to see that strategy working out well given the amount of information that’s already coming to light. Dan ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Thomas Walkom highlights the lesson we should draw from the economic devastation caused by the shutdown of an Electro-Motive plant which was supposed to serve as a poster child for corporate giveaways: Using tax breaks to encourage domestic production is a standard prescription. Yet, ironically, that’s exactly what ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2012 Roundup

The NDP’s leadership campaign has been relatively quiet in the day-plus since Sunday’s debate as the resumption of Parliament offered other fodder for political discussion. But let’s follow up on the debate and what has happened since then. – Aaron Wherry live-blogged the debate, then rounded up debate reactions so the rest of us don’t ...

Accidental Deliberations: Leadership 2012 Roundup

Yes, we’re at the point in the campaign where we can’t go a couple of days without plenty of developments – even in the absence of formal debates or other major events. So let’s take a look at how the week ended on the campaign trail. – Niki Ashton received a glowing review (if not ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Stephen Maher and Barbara Yaffe have learned to be duly skeptical of the Cons’ motives when it comes to Senate patronage. But John Ibbitson still has a ways to go – as he’s apparently still buying Con spin about new provinces holding Senate elections which has long ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – The Star makes the case for Canada’s wealthiest citizens to pay their fair share: Apart from their hefty pay packets, the top-earning CEOs are sitting on $2 billion in stock options that are treated as dividend income, and taxed at half the value. That’s a tax break worth ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Yes, it’s absolutely asinine that the Cons’ attacks on Muslim women have been extended to denying citizenship based on a particular type of clothing. But after the Cons’ repeated efforts to suppress veiled voting, we shouldn’t expect anything less from them. And indeed the goal looks to ...