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Parchment in the Fire: Embedding neoliberalism in Greece: the transformation of collective bargaining and labour market policy in Greece during the Eurozone crisis

(2016). Embedding neoliberalism in Greece: the transformation of collective bargaining and labour market policy in Greece during the Eurozone crisis. Studies in Political Economy. Ahead of Print. doi: 10.1080/07078552.2016.1249129

Source: Embedding neoliberalism in Greece: the transformation of collective bargaining and labour market policy in Greece during the Eurozone crisis

Filed under: Eurozone crisis, Uncategorized Tagged: . . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: Embedding neoliberalism in Greece: the transformation of collective bargaining and labour market policy in Greece during the Eurozone crisis

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Lana Payne comments on the importance of the labour movement in ensuring that economic growth translates into benefits for workers: The findings of a study released this month by the Canadian Centre for Study of Living Standards, an Ottawa-based think-tank, reinforces why there is a “pervasive sense among . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Parchment in the Fire: Thousands march to mark 1973 student revolt, protest against austerity | News | ekathimerini.com

Thousands of Greeks vented frustration at their economic lot on Thursday as they marched in Athens to mark the anniversary of the bloody 1973 student uprising that helped topple the then-military junta.

Source: Thousands march to mark 1973 student revolt, protest against austerity | News | ekathimerini.com

Filed under: Eurozone crisis Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, . . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: Thousands march to mark 1973 student revolt, protest against austerity | News | ekathimerini.com

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– Karen Foster and Tamara Krawchenko discuss how policy can – and should – be designed to improve intergenerational equity: Canada trails far behind other industrialized nations in its attention to intergenerational equity. The country could do far more to report on a carefully defined intergenerational equity, track . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Parchment in the Fire: Economic woes create anti-establishment movements around the world | Business | The Guardian

In some western countries frustration with the status quo is boosting populist and rightwing political parties

Source: Economic woes create anti-establishment movements around the world | Business | The Guardian

Filed under: Uncategorized Tagged: Austerity, crisis of capitalism, neoliberalism

. . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: Economic woes create anti-establishment movements around the world | Business | The Guardian

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your Monday reading.

– Branko Milanovic highlights the futility of pretending that market mechanisms will produce anything other than profit-oriented outcomes – and the observation represents an obvious reason not to put public services in corporate hands. And David Sloan Wilson (in introducing an interview with Sigrun Aasland) points out how Norway’s . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Larry Beinhart argues that aside from the gross unfairness and economic harm from growing inequality, there’s a basic problem trusting the uber-rich to make reasonable decisions with massive amounts of wealth. And George Monbiot makes the case that even as he pretends to be an outsider, Donald . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

This fall, Canada’s Parliament will debate a proposal to expand the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). And over at the Behind the Numbers web site, I’m co-author of a blog post titled “Ten things to know about the CPP debate.” The blog post’s other co-authors are Allan Moscovitch and Richard Lochead.

Points raised in the blog . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten things to know about the CPP debate

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

– Jordan Brennan points out why Nova Scotia (and other jurisdictions) should move past austerity economics: The McNeil Liberals appear set to rack up budgetary surpluses through a strategy of public sector wage suppression. This is likely to backfire. It is an elementary insight of economic analysis that, . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Brad Wall’s call for Canada to stop funding international climate change adaptation and mitigation reflects just one more example of his government’s tendency to kick down at the people least able to defend themselves.

For further reading…– Gregory Beatty again documented the background to Wall’s abandonment of an equalization system which . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Ellen Gould comments on how the CETA and other trade deals constrain democratic governance – and the fact that corporate bigwigs are threatening any government which considers giving effect to popular opposition doesn’t exactly provide any comfort. Meanwhile, Scott Sinclair points out the dangerous effects of the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

– Joel Wood highlights the social cost of carbon as a crucial reason to work on reducing greenhouse gas emissions rather than insisting on doing the absolute least the rest of the world will tolerate. And needless to say, Brad Wall’s idea of an argument for the position that . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Parchment in the Fire: Greece: A Country for Sale | Jacobin

Alexis Tsipras and his Syriza government have overseen privatizations at a scale unseen since German reunification. Source: Greece: A Country for Sale | JacobinFiled under: Eurozone crisis Tagged: Austerity, Greece, privatization, Syriza . . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: Greece: A Country for Sale | Jacobin

Parchment in the Fire: The European Challenge | Jacobin

For all of its success, Podemos has refused to deal seriously with the European Union and what it would take to truly transform Spain. Source: The European Challenge | JacobinFiled under: Europe, Eurozone crisis Tagged: Austerity, Podemos, Spain . . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: The European Challenge | Jacobin

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Nora Loreto slams the Wynne Libs’ “red tape” gimmick, while highlighting the need for people to claim a voice in rules largely intended to protect them as workers and consumers:One person’s red tape is another p… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Parchment in the Fire: A year after the crisis was declared over, Greece is still spiralling down

Helena Smith in Athens for the Guardian 13 August 2016 In a side street in the heart of Athens, two siblings are hard at work. For the past year they have run their hairdressing business – an enterprise that was once located on a busy boulevard – out of a two-bedroom flat. The move was… More A year after the crisis was declared over, Greece is still spiralling down . . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: A year after the crisis was declared over, Greece is still spiralling down

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Owen Jones interviews Ha-Joon Chang about the foreseeable harm caused by the UK’s austerity, as well as the false claims used to push it. – The Stoney Creek News rightly argues that Canada Post should move toward pos… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Parchment in the Fire: Neoliberalism and De-democratization in Greece

Public discourse of neoliberalism often fails to appreciate the extent to which it entails not a simple process of de-regulation, but rather, a process of pro-market re-regulation. In many cases, constraints are removed from the organizational capacities of capital while more constraints are imposed upon organized labour. For example, the neoliberal era has witnessed increasing… More Neoliberalism and De-democratization in Greece . . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: Neoliberalism and De-democratization in Greece

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- David Blanchflower notes that there’s virtually no dispute that the UK is headed into an economic downturn – meaning that there’s also no excuse to hold off on fiscal relief for the public. And Brad DeLong po… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Michal Rozworski: Building a Corbyn majority: interview with Richard Seymour

My podcast interview with Richard Seymour on the roots and prospects of Corbynism appeared in Jacobin last week. While the United Kingdom has been reeling from political crisis to political crisis in the aftermath of the Brexit referendum, Jeremy Corbyn has never looked stronger. He showed his principles in apologizing for a war he opposed from […] . . . → Read More: Michal Rozworski: Building a Corbyn majority: interview with Richard Seymour

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Aditya Chakrabortty sums up George Osborne’s legacy – and give or take a Brexit vote, it looks awfully familiar for corporatist governments in general:The multi-million-pound spending spree wasn’t justifiable, … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

The Progressive Economics Forum: How not to fund infrastructure

Recycling is supposed to be a good thing, so when the federal Liberals quietly announced that “asset recycling” would be part of their strategy for meeting their much-ballyhooed infrastructure promises, not many eyebrows were raised. They should have been. Asset recycling is an obscure code word for selling our public goods for private profit. It’s […] . . . → Read More: The Progressive Economics Forum: How not to fund infrastructure

Michal Rozworski: How not to fund infrastructure

Recycling is supposed to be a good thing, so when the federal Liberals quietly announced that “asset recycling” would be part of their strategy for meeting their much-ballyhooed infrastructure promises, not many eyebrows were raised. They should have been. Asset recycling is an obscure code word for selling our public goods for private profit. It’s […] . . . → Read More: Michal Rozworski: How not to fund infrastructure

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- Trevor Hancock writes that if we’re going to designate anything as a public health emergency, poverty should top the list:I was pleased to see the B.C. Ministry of Health use the powers of the provincial health offic… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Oxfam points out the latest World Wealth Report showing that extreme inequality and wealth continue to grow around the globe. And AFP reports on the IMF’s warnings that inequality and poverty represent signific… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links