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Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Paul de Grauwe points out that the European push to force Greece into continued austerity is the most important factor holding back a recovery, as the country would be fully solvent if it were being allowed to borrow money on anything but the most draconian of terms. And Paul Mason criticizes the war that’s been declared against the Greek public for trying to pursue democratic governance – while noting that the public’s justified dissatisfaction isn’t going away regardless of the result of the impending referendum.

- Sherif Alsayed-Ali responds to the news that (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: Oxi: a political opening amid economic ruin

This week has been a taste of what the economy would look like with a real rupture with the Eurozone: uncertainty, elite blackmail, banks teetering on the brink and the start of rationing. That the mobilization of Syriza and the left outside it has overcome this and made Oxi a possibility is impressive. Greece and its economy can expect no miracles either way Sunday’s vote goes and for quite some time afterwards, but they deserve full international solidarity.

And so on the eve of the Greek referendum, with the streets of Athens still buzzing from Friday night’s enormous Oxi!/No! (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: Europeans tried to block IMF debt report on Greece, say sources | Business | ekathimerini.com

Europeans tried to block IMF debt report on Greece, say sources | Business | ekathimerini.com.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Europe Stands in Solidarity with Massive OXI (No) Vote Rally in Athens Greece

Europe Stands in Solidarity with Massive OXI (No) Vote Rally in Athens Greece.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Daniel Marans reports on Bernie Sanders’ push for international action against austerity in Greece and elsewhere. And Binoy Kampmark documents the anti-democratic and antisocial ideology on the other side of the austerity debate.

- Noah Smith writes that while there’s no discernible connection between massive pay for CEOs and actual corporate performance, there’s a strong link between who an executive knows and how much the executive can extract.

- The CP reports on UNESCO’s push to study the impact of the tar sands on Wood Buffalo National Park. And Tavia Grant breaks (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: IMF: austerity measures would still leave Greece with unsustainable debt | World news | The Guardian

IMF: austerity measures would still leave Greece with unsustainable debt | World news | The Guardian.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, IMF, Syriza, Troika

Parchment in the Fire: This referendum is a fight between the Greeks and Europe’s cruel capitalism | Aditya Chakrabortty | Comment is free | The Guardian

This referendum is a fight between the Greeks and Europe’s cruel capitalism | Aditya Chakrabortty | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Greece in chaos: will Syriza’s last desperate gamble pay off? | World news | The Guardian

Greece in chaos: will Syriza’s last desperate gamble pay off? | World news | The Guardian.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Will the Greek Referendum Bring the Troika Back to the Bargaining Table? (2/2)

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Will the Greek Referendum Bring the Troika Back to the Bargaining Table? (1/2)

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Tsipras goes for referendum on 5 July | Paul Mason | Paul Mason

Tsipras goes for referendum on 5 July | Paul Mason | Paul Mason.

It may come down to: who has the biggest social power on the streets – the Greek left, including the KKE, Syriza, the unions etc. – or the right. Which is what Greek history has always tried not to ask since 1974.

It may come down to: who has the biggest social power on the streets — the Greek left, inclduing the KKE, Syriza, the unions etc — or the right. Which is what Greek history has always tried not to ask since 1974. – See more (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Afternoon Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Edward Keenan weighs in on the role a basic income could play in a job market marked by increasingly precarious work: I am an enthusiastic supporter of better workplace protections and wages. I have a good, unionized, stable job. I like it. But regulation of work and workplaces isn’t likely adequate to solve the problem we face. No matter how high minimum wages are, they will not help people unable to get a job that pays them. And there are a lot of reasons to think that no matter how good workplace safeguards (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: Greece’s rich: insulated against an EU exit | World news | The Guardian

Greece’s rich: insulated against an EU exit | World news | The Guardian.

Filed under: Greece Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Grexit

Political Eh-conomy: Europe ready to kill Greece to keep TINA alive

My latest piece on Greece was published yesterday at Ricochet. In short, Europe and the IMF’s message that ‘there still is no alternative’ proves that objective of punitive austerity is political, not economic. Here it is in full:

The project’s aim is to make an example of Greece and solidify austerity as the only option within a Europe united by elite interests. Emergency summits, duelling proposals, trickles of banking system support and stern warnings create an economic veneer to paper over ultimately political aims.

Take the latest “compromise” proposal made yesterday by Greece’s ruling party Syriza. It offers a whopping additional (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Sheila Block points out the problems with the spread of low-paying, precarious jobs. And PressProgress fact-checks the CFIB’s attempt to make as many workers’ lives as precarious as possible by suppressing minimum wages and standards.

- But Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports that Ontario’s provincial government is making matters worse by handing millions of dollars to the same temp agencies who are most aggressively flouting employment standards laws. And the Star warns of the need to ensure that Toronto’s plan to fight poverty actually leads to action.

- Meanwhile, Ezra Klein points out the importance (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: UK: 250,000 march to “End Austerity Now”…the Tories respond with more cuts

UK: 250,000 march to “End Austerity Now”…the Tories respond with more cuts.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, UK

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

- Mark Anderson reports on the Change Readiness Index’ findings that the growing concentration and inequality of wealth is making it more and more difficult for countries to deal with foreseeable disasters. But Jon Queally points out that a concerted effort to quit abusing fossil fuels could do a world in making our world both more fair and more sustainable.

- James Galbraith suggests that the EU is guilty of gross malpractice in how it continues to treat Greece in the face of overwhelming public opposition to austerity. But as David Dayen points (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: Hopes for Greece bailout deal rise sharply as Athens gives ground | Business | The Guardian

Hopes for Greece bailout deal rise sharply as Athens gives ground | Business | The Guardian.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Anti-austerity protests: tens of thousands rally across UK | World news | The Guardian

Anti-austerity protests: tens of thousands rally across UK | World news | The Guardian.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, UK

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Roderick Benns reports on Ryan Meili’s argument for a basic income: Dr. Ryan Meili was in Kingston, Ontario, recently to talk to more than 100 people about the importance of the social determinants of health in an event that was hosted by Basic Income Kingston. The social determinants of health influence health outcomes for people and include many components that work together, including income and income distribution, education, unemployment and job security, among others.

Meili described a basic income guarantee as “an exciting opportunity” and a kind of “social investment to counter inequality,” (Read more…)

Political Eh-conomy: Repeat after me: Alberta isn’t Greece

Last week it was Andrew Coyne; this week it’s Jack Mintz. Seems all the National Post’s favourite conservative commentators have suddenly decided to offer their Very Serious Advice™ to Alberta’s new government. While Coyne made a spurious comparison between raising the minimum wage and instituting a minimum income, Mintz outdoes him with an even more spurious comparison between Alberta and Greece.

Simply put, it is completely disingenuous to compare Greece to Alberta. Greece has seen its economy lose a quarter of its GDP since 2008 – a level of economic crisis unseen since the Great Depression. Unemployment has spiked to (Read more…)

Parchment in the Fire: ‘Making us poorer won’t save Greece’: how pension crisis is hurting its people | World news | The Guardian

‘Making us poorer won’t save Greece’: how pension crisis is hurting its people | World news | The Guardian.

Filed under: Austerity Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, pensions

Parchment in the Fire: Drip Feeding Greece Will End in Default

Filed under: Eurozone crisis Tagged: Austerity, Eurozone Crisis, Greece, Syriza

Parchment in the Fire: Greece has nothing to lose by saying no to creditors – FT.com

Greece has nothing to lose by saying no to creditors – FT.com.

By Wolfgang Münchau

So here we are. Alexis Tsipras has been told to take it or leave it. What should he do?

 

The Greek prime minister does not face elections until January 2019. Any course of action he decides on now would have to bear fruit in three years or less.

 

First, contrast the two extreme scenarios: accept the creditors’ final offer or leave the eurozone. By accepting the offer, he would have to agree to a fiscal adjustment of 1.7 per cent (Read more…)

. . . → Read More: Parchment in the Fire: Greece has nothing to lose by saying no to creditors – FT.com

Parchment in the Fire: The Looming Austerity Package | Jacobin

The Looming Austerity Package | Jacobin.

by Costas Lapavitsas

Developments in the debt negotiations between Greece and the European institutions have come thick and fast in the last days: the submission of proposals by the Greek side, leaks of lenders’ supposed counter-proposals, their rejection by Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, pre-agenda debate in the Parliament — where Tsipras repeated his outright rejection of the counter-proposals — and then a refusal to pay the June 5 installment of the International Monetary Fund loan. We are clearly at a critical turning point.

The only political party capable of moving Greece forward at (Read more…)