Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Baratunde Thurston makes the point that even beyond income and wealth inequality, there’s an obviously unfair distribution of second chances in the U.S. depending on one’s race and class. Denis Campbell reports on the link between poverty and childhood obesity, while Jen St. Denis highlights how poverty ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Lucy Shaddock offers a response to the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ report on poverty and inequality in the UK, while McKinsey finds that hundreds of millions of people in advanced economies are seeing their real incomes stagnate or decline. And Mariana Mazzucato and Michael Jacobs provide their take ...

Politics and its Discontents: A Shameful Legacy

During the dark years of the Harper administrations, Canadians became almost inured to the lengths it would go while promoting its neo-liberal agenda. The extolment of free trade, the promotion of tar sands development, the sneering dismissal of all environmental and climate-change concerns were what we came to expect from a government that was committed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Evening Links

This and that for your Thursday reading. – Daniel Marans reports on Bernie Sanders’ push for international action against austerity in Greece and elsewhere. And Binoy Kampmark documents the anti-democratic and antisocial ideology on the other side of the austerity debate. – Noah Smith writes that while there’s no discernible connection between massive pay for ...

Politics and its Discontents: Stephen Harper: Merry Christmas And Bah, Humbug!

My fellow Canadians, If the above doesn’t not warm the cockles of your Christmas hearts, please check out these, a small portion of this year’s ‘gifts’: Something for your digestive consideration. Something for the greenie on your seasonal list. And, for those workers both domestic and foreign, one of my perennial favourites. Merry Christmas to ...

Accidental Deliberations: On consensus-breaking

Having earlier dealt with Stephen Harper’s attempt to justify war by building up hatred and hype toward ISIS, I’ll note the other main rationale on offer from the Cons – which can generally be described as government by wrong answer to a rhetorical question: If Canada wants to keep its voice in the world…and we ...

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading. – Lana Payne discusses the need to address inequality through our political system. But that will require significant pressure from exactly the citizens who have decided they’re not well served by today’s political options – and Trish Hennessy’s look at Canadian voter turnout reminds us of the desperate need ...

Politics and its Discontents: On Sporadic Blogging And Willful Ignorance

We are hosting our dear friends from Cuba for about the next week, so depending on our sight-seeing schedule, my blogging may not be quite as regular as usual. But then again, I am an early riser, so perhaps nothing will change. Here is something I prepared the other day to save for this fine ...

Politics and its Discontents: A Suggestion For Kellie Leitch

She may be a lost cause, but I have a suggestion for Harper enthusiast/Simcoe Grey Conservative M.P. Kellie Leitch, about whom I have written previously on this blog. The former medical doctor turned defender of the indefensible, who is one of a series of rotating trained seals spokespeople for her dear leader, would be well-advised ...

Politics and its Discontents: The Harper Government’s Legacy of Death

Checking my blog archive, I found that I have written a total of 22 posts on asbestos. Here is number 23. Two years ago, Canada was the sole nation to oppose adding chrysotile asbestos to the list of hazardous products under the Rotterdam Convention. Such a listing would not have banned the export of the ...

Impolitical: Putting the Progressive back in the Conservatives?

It’s September, the big back to school month, and Parliament resumes sitting this coming week. Interesting then to note some moves being made by the Harper government, perhaps designed to put a new coat of paint on their tired, right wing shtick. Noted in the past day or so… “Canada gives up defending asbestos.” Citing ...

Illuminated By Street Lamps: ‘Winners’ And Losers In Quebec Asbestos Mess

Photo: Vsmith/Wikipedia Support for Canadian chrysotile asbestos is dead. First point, this: Canada should have gotten out of the asbestos game a long time ago.All asbestos causes cancer.  We won’t use it. And, we’ve been out of step with our European friends.But now, the inconvenient rub.With apparently no clear plan about how to diversify the economy ...

Politics and its Discontents: Harper’s Conservatives: As Classless As Ever

Yesterday I wrote a brief post about the federal government’s decision to stop defending the export of asbestos from Quebec, not on the basis of morality, but political expediency, as the newly-elected Parti Quebecois stands opposed to it. A story in this morning’s Star reveals that, as ever, the Harper regime is both as graceless ...

Politics and its Discontents: Canada’s Export of Death to Cease

The Harper government is throwing in the towel on Quebec’s internationally-maligned asbestos industry now that the Parti Québécois is poised to take power and prohibit extraction of the cancer-causing mineral. Industry Minister Christian Paradis said Canada will stop defending asbestos mining in international circles and no longer oppose adding chrysotile asbestos to the Rotterdam Convention, ...

Politics and its Discontents: An Easy Way To Gauge The Moral Fiber Of Canadian Politicians

Ask them for their stand on the indefensible export of asbestos. Recommend this Post

Life...A Small Spark Between Two Eternities: Are Harper and Charest Murderers?

The news that the Jeffrey Mine will reopen may warm some hearts in the Eastern Townships. Nevertheless, the Quebec government’s decision to provide a $58-million loan to Canada’s last asbestos mine is a shameful thing. As Canadians headed off to the beach and the cottage last Friday, Yvon Vallières, provincial Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and ...

Life...A Small Spark Between Two Eternities: Are Harper and Charest Murderers?

The news that the Jeffrey Mine will reopen may warm some hearts in the Eastern Townships. Nevertheless, the Quebec government’s decision to provide a $58-million loan to Canada’s last asbestos mine is a shameful thing. As Canadians headed off to the beach and the cottage last Friday, Yvon Vallières, provincial Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs and ...

Politics and its Discontents: Asbestos Redux

Canada continues to be an outlier amongst Western nations as the sole exporter of death, aka asbestos, a topic that I have written about many times on this blog. The federal government continues to perpetuate the lie that the highly carcinogenic substance is safe if handled properly, despite the fact that the Harper regime vetoed ...

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading. – Derrick O’Keefe calls for a mass movement to stop the Harper Cons in their tracks now, rather than waiting for 2015: Thoughts of ousting Harper in 2015 are well and good, but not nearly sufficient at this perilous moment for democracy and social justice in Canada. Given Bill ...

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading. – Dr. Dawg highlights Peter Russell’s take on the Cons’ 2008 efforts to prevent a Parliamentary majority from actually exercising its right to vote down a government which had lost the confidence of the House of Commons. And Steven Chase follows up by noting the role that the ...

Peace, order and good government, eh?: Conservative values are Canadian values

Toronto Sun, June 1, 2011: Conservative values are Canadians values, Prime Minister Stephen Harper told his new team of MPs Wednesday, but urged them to stay “humble” as they kicked off their majority mandate. Vancouver Sun, June 25, 2012: The federal government acknowledged years ago that the dangers of chrysotile asbestos warranted limits on its ...

Accidental Deliberations: Parliament in Review: May 1, 2012

Tuesday, May 1 saw more debate on a couple of relatively non-contentious bills – along with a prime example of the Cons’ blinkered focus on mandatory minimum sentences. The Big Issue In continued debate on the Lucky Moose self-defence bill, the NDP pointed out some of the ways the legislation could have been improved if ...

BigCityLib Strikes Back: Progress Is Measured In Small Increments

 A decades-old pro-asbestos lobby group, currently funded by the Quebec government, will be shutting its doors after notifying the federal government of its plan to dissolve. …but it can be measured.  A couple of years back the Feds were also funding these guys.

Politics and its Discontents: An Update On Canada’s Export Of Death (Asbestos)

While I have written many posts on Canada’s indefensible export of asbestos to third-world nations, I am pleased to report that the latest news seems to suggest that this hideous and immoral practice could soon be coming to an end. Despite the ardent and ongoing efforts of the Harper regime and Quebec premier Jean Charest, ...

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week. – Michelle Lalonde notes that despite continued giveaways from both the federal and provincial governments, Quebec’s asbestos industry may soon fade away due to a lack of any economic case for private funding. – Jessica Bruno reports on major cuts to the federal public sector which have been inflicted ...