Prog Blog’s Flickr Photostream

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Assorted content to start your week.- Karen Palmer writes about a push by U.S. doctors to follow in Canada’s footsteps with single-payer health care – even as a few profiteers seek to tear our system apart:Global evidence shows that private insurance … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Alex's Blog: Alex’s Blog 2016-05-12 18:36:30

A couple of days back, Ed Broadbent, Hugh Segal and I published an op-ed making the case for some form of proportional representation. Yesterday the government announced its process for assessing a range of options, making 2015 the last federal election under our first past the post system. And today the editorial pages are awash … Continue reading . . . → Read More: Alex’s Blog: Alex’s Blog 2016-05-12 18:36:30

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, on how Justin Trudeau’s control over the federal electoral reform committee looks to extend a familiar pattern of top-down government into the design of our electoral system. (And I’ll add one point here which didn’t make it into the column: the … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Carolyn Ferns writes that a long-awaited child care program would represent the best possible Mother’s Day gift for Canadian families.- Danyaal Raza and Ritika Goel remind us how housing affects a wide range … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- David Crane identifies the good news in the Parliamentary Budget Officer’s report on climate change – which is that we can meet our greenhouse gas emissions targets through readily feasible policy choices as long a… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.- The BBC reports that even UK business groups are acknowledging that excessive executive pay is leading to public concern and distrust in the state of the economy. And Alex Hern notes that Steve Wozniak for one isn’t … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Montreal Simon: The Grim Story of Postmedia and the Millionaire’s Club

Oh dear. I can only imagine what the mood at Postmedia headquarters must be like after the latest bit of bad news.With writers like John Ivison and Andrew Coyne fighting over the last place in the lifeboat.Or begging their boss Paul Godfrey to give the… . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: The Grim Story of Postmedia and the Millionaire’s Club

Montreal Simon: Jason Kenney and the Insane Con War on the Deficit

Yesterday I told you that Jason Kenney has apparently decided to ignore his better political instincts, and his main adviser, and is preparing to launch his campaign to become the new leader of the Harper Party.And has decided to make the Liberal'… . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: Jason Kenney and the Insane Con War on the Deficit

Montreal Simon: Could This Be The End of the Postmedia Empire?

As you know the Postmedia empire is in big trouble. It's buried under a mountain of debt, it's running out of money, and its reporters have been forced to tailor their articles to please their bosses.If they attack Justin Trudeau they can keep … . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: Could This Be The End of the Postmedia Empire?

Montreal Simon: The Cons and the Postmedia Conspiracy

Ever since Paul Godfrey ordered his major Postmedia papers to run an ad on their front pages attacking the Liberals, there has been no doubt whatsoever which side that media conglomerate is on.And although the move was widely denounced, it seems that … . . . → Read More: Montreal Simon: The Cons and the Postmedia Conspiracy

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.- Will Wachtmeister reviews Malcolm Torry’s book of arguments for a basic income, focusing in particular on social cohesion and innovation as important reasons why individuals should enjoy economic security. But Se… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Chris Harper highlights a few of the factors necessary to help boost the long-term health of children:First, Antonovsky found that whatever stresses you encounter must be comprehensible. Children, for exampl… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Scott Santens discusses how a basic income could help to foster social cohesion. And Jared Bernstein confirms the seemingly obvious point that properly-funded social programs work wonders in reducing poverty. – … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Here, expanding on these posts as to what might come next as Canada’s political parties map out their strategies on electoral reform.For further reading…- Chantal Hebert wonders whether Justin Trudeau will face internal pressure to renege on his prom… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: New column day

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Dani Rodrik discusses the evolution of work, and notes that future development and sharing of wealth may need to follow a different model than the one that’s applied in the past:(T)he post-industrial economy o… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Alberta Politics: Brown shoes may not make it, but Justin Trudeau’s cabinet choices seem pretty sound

PHOTOS: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, members of his cabinet and ordinary Canadians walk toward the swearing-in ceremony yesterday morning at Government House in Ottawa. (Vancouver Observer photo.) Below: Mr. Trudeau’s father, Pierre Trudeau, making the same walk with members of his new cabinet down the same driveway in 1968. Below them: Alberta cabinet members Kent […]

The post Brown shoes may not make it, but Justin Trudeau’s cabinet choices seem pretty sound appeared first on Alberta Politics.

Montreal Simon: Is the National Post Trying to Muzzle Andrew Coyne?

I rarely agree with anything Andrew Coyne says or writes. I don't share his missionary faith in an economic system that I believe has been corrupted to its core by the rich and the powerful.There couldn't be a better example of that corruption, than the way the big MSM organizations like Postmedia are commanding its editorial employees to endorse the Harper Cons.And ironically enough, in this campaign, Coyne may be its first casualty. Read more »

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Don Pittis examines the Cons’ record on jobs and the economy, and reaches the inevitable conclusion that free trade bluster and corporate giveaways have done nothing to help Canadians – which makes it no wonder the Cons are hiding the terms of the deals they sign. And John Jacobs writes that the Trans-Pacific Partnership only stands to make matters worse: Canada is exporting goods that create few domestic jobs and importing goods that create jobs elsewhere. This accounts for some of the decline in manufacturing employment over the past decade in Canada and (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.

- Scott Santens writes about one possible endpoint of the current trend toward precarious employment, being the implementation of a basic income to make sure a job isn’t necessary to enable people to do meaningful work. And Common Dreams reports that a strong majority of lower-wage workers support both unions, and political parties and candidates who will allow them to function.

- Harvey Cashore and David Seglins follow up on the multiple connections between the Cons, the Canada Revenue Agency and KPMG even as the latter was under investigation for facilitating offshore tax (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

- The Equality Trust reminds us that economic inequality leads to harmful health consequences even for the lucky few at the top of the income scale. And Matt Bruenig observes that a basic income would provide workers with far more scope to avoid employer abuses and other stressors.

- The Council of Canadians points out how the Trans-Pacific Partnership could block any path toward a national pharmacare plan and more fair prescription drug prices. And Andy Blatchford highlights the secrecy surrounding the agreement even as it should be the subject of electoral scrutiny.

- (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Thomas Walkom discusses how Canadian workers are feeling the pain of decades of policy designed to suppress wages – and notes there’s plenty more all parties should be doing to change that reality. And Doug Saunders points out what we should want our next federal government to pursue to bring about lasting growth: Many economists came to realize not only that government intervention bailed many countries out of the post-2008 recession and restored growth and employment, but that the crisis itself may have been caused, in good part, by the disappearance of active (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Louise Arbour’s interview with The House includes both her compelling criticisms of both the Cons’ terror bill, and the Libs’ failure to stand up against C-51. And the Canadian Press reports on Justin Trudeau’s continued fecklessness, as he won’t even take a position on whether the bill is constitutional after having ordered his party to support it.

- Crawford Kilian writes that while it’s too late to atone for the death of Alan Kurdi, we should have no hesitation in making sure the same doesn’t happen to other people we can help. (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On judicious outrage

Following up on this post, let’s take a look at the flip side of the possibility that political parties can help themselves out significantly by taking umbrage with competitors’ treatment of them – which is the success (or lack thereof) of exactly that strategy over the past decade.

As I’ve pointed out before, while 2004 might be the last example of an outrage-based strategy substantially shifting poll numbers, there are more recent cases where it’s been tried.

Indeed, the Libs have regularly attempted to make political hay out of the claim that the Cons aren’t playing fair. And (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Attack and response

Earlier this week, Andrew Coyne mused on Twitter about how parties seek to make hay out of attacks by their opponents, with particular emphasis on the Libs’ response to PC and Con attacks on their leaders in 1993 and 2004. But I’d think it’s worth noting some distinctions between then and now which may make the tactic rather less effective than it might once have been – as well as discussing the circumstances where it might still work.

To start with, let’s look at the threshold a party needs to cross to be seen as going too far – and (Read more…)

Politics and its Discontents: Sympathy For The Devil?

With tongue firmly ensconced in his cheek, Andrew Coyne writes that we are being too hard on Stephen Harper, a prime minister who has been cruelly betrayed by all those in whom he placed an absolute trust: You will be familiar with the picture we have created of him: suspicious, paranoid, controlling, a leader who trusts no one, leaves nothing to others, insists on taking a hand in even the smallest matter. Well, you’d be suspicious, paranoid and controlling, too, if everyone around you was lying to you all the time.

Such deception would be enough to break the spirit (Read more…)