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Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Michal Rozworski writes that the Trudeau Libs’ economic model has come into view, and that we should be fighting back against what it means for the public: I’ve long argued that the Liberals are at the leading edge of rebuilding a centrist, neoliberal consensus for a low-growth world. This is . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– John Quiggin argues that public services and corporate control don’t mix – no matter how desperately the people seeking to exploit public money try to pretend otherwise: Market-oriented reforms, particularly in the provision of human services like health, education and public safety, have begun with a working . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material to start your week.- Michael Harris argues that it’s long past time for the Trudeau Libs to start living up to their oft-repeated promise of real change – rather than merely slapping a friendlier face on the same old regressive C… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Monday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Lucy Shaddock offers a response to the Institute for Fiscal Studies’ report on poverty and inequality in the UK, while McKinsey finds that hundreds of millions of people in advanced economies are seein… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Andre Picard writes about the devastating effects of widespread social isolation, particularly given its connection to poverty: All told, it is estimated that about six million Canadians live an isola… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Afternoon Links

Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

This and that for your Thursday reading.- Andre Picard writes about the widespread poverty faced by indigenous children in Canada – and the obvious need for political action to set things right: The focus of the [CCPA’s] report, rightly, is on the chil… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Thursday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.- Duncan Cameron discusses how deficit hysteria has overshadowed the far more important issues raised by the Trudeau Libs’ inaugural budget:Ottawa deficit spending is not big enough to stimulate an econo… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Matthew Yglesias writes that The Big Short and other stories focused on the financial aspects of the 2008 economic meltdown miss by far the most important part of the picture in the real economic destruction wro… . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.- Matthew Yglesias rightly points out the absurdity of monetary policy designed to rein in at-target inflation at the expense of desperately-needed employment. And Joseph Stiglitz reminds us that we can instead … . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

This and that for your Tuesday reading.

– John Thornhill talks to Mariana Mazzucato about the importance of public investment in fostering economic growth – along with the need for the public to benefit as a result: As Mazzucato explains it, the traditional way of framing the debate about wealth creation is to picture the . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Assorted content to end your week.

– Aditya Chakrabortty contrasts the myth of the free market against the reality that massive amounts of public money and other privileges are shoveled toward the corporate sector: Few conceits are more cherished by our political classes than the notion that this is a free-market economy. To the right . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Friday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– Duncan Cameron discusses how Canada can respond to being stalled economically: In 2011 median earnings in Canada were $30,000. That means one-half of Canadian workers earned less than $30,000. What is more to the point is that earnings in 2011 were $1,800 below the level attained in 1977 . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

– In a theme all too familiar based on Brad Wall’s use of millions of public dollars to pay for access to U.S. lawmakers, Simon Enoch discusses the connections between Wall and ALEC: Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough is both a member and State corporate co-chair the American Legislative Exchange . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Facing Autism in New Brunswick: UPDATE: Globe and Mail Health Columnist André Picard Abandons Evidence Based Autism Treatment Principle, Embraces SON-RISE PROGRAM®

André Picard is a Globe and Mail public health reporter with the Glboe and Mail which is promoting the Son-Rise Program®, a purported autism program with almost no evidence based support of its effectiveness, a program which is not even mentioned in the recent CMAJ (2014) article or the (2007) AAP (reaffirmed 2010) . . . → Read More: Facing Autism in New Brunswick: UPDATE: Globe and Mail Health Columnist André Picard Abandons Evidence Based Autism Treatment Principle, Embraces SON-RISE PROGRAM®

OPSEU Diablogue: Picard blames health professionals for slow pace of “reform”

How can we improve Canada’s health system? Blaming the professionals who deliver care defies logic. You may be very surprised to learn that one prominent journalist says the biggest obstacles to health care reform are the people who deliver it … Continue reading →

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

– Grant Gordon rightly criticizes the “taxpayer” frame in discussing how public policy affects citizens: (T)here’s a difference between being smart with our money and just being cheap.

Conservatives are fond of saying they wish government ran more like a business. Well, sometimes it’s better business to . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

OPSEU Diablogue: Guidelines for media reporting of suicide need reconsideration – Picard, Goldbloom

If the audience was expecting a debate, they may have left disappointed. Globe and Mail reporter Andre Picard and Dr. David Goldbloom, Chair of the Mental Health Commission of Canada, spoke about the media’s portrayal of mental health during a Longwood’s … Continue reading →

daveberta.ca - Alberta politics: Canadians deserve answers about XL Foods beef, as company sticks its head in the sand and Alberta politicians give in to old populist ways.

TweetUntil its licence was temporarily suspended on September 27, more than one-third of Canadian beef was processed in the XL Foods plant in Brooks, Alberta. The plant processed 4000 cows a day and produces 3000 steaks each minute. The sheer size of this plant raises serious questions about the centralization of the packing industry in . . . → Read More: daveberta.ca – Alberta politics: Canadians deserve answers about XL Foods beef, as company sticks its head in the sand and Alberta politicians give in to old populist ways.

False positive: private profit in Canada's health care: The Risks of For-Profit Community Care

With the sale of the Shouldice Clinic to a health care conglomerate it is useful to review some of the literature comparing for-profit hospitals to non-profit hospitals. The results show that:

1) there is a higher risk of death in for-profit hospitals, http://www.cmaj.ca/content/166/11/1399.full :

2) private for-profit hospitals result in higher payments for care than . . . → Read More: False positive: private profit in Canada’s health care: The Risks of For-Profit Community Care

THE CAREGIVERS' LIVING ROOM - A Blog by Donna Thomson: Medicare in the 21st Century – Change is Afoot!

On May 23, I was lucky enough to hear Andre Picard speak.  He’s the health and social policy writer for the Globe and Mail newspaper, but he’s much more than just a good journalist.  Picard is the 2012  CIBC Scholar-in-Residence Chair at the Conference Board of Canada.  Picard chose to speak on “The Path to . . . → Read More: THE CAREGIVERS’ LIVING ROOM – A Blog by Donna Thomson: Medicare in the 21st Century – Change is Afoot!

Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

Assorted content to end your day.

– Kayle Hatt’s blog looks to be a must-read from here on in. And his post on what to draw from the latest polls is particularly worth a read: Every poll that has been released since Thomas Mulcair was elected leader of the NDP has showed the NDP on . . . → Read More: Accidental Deliberations: Tuesday Afternoon Links

False positive: private profit in Canada's health care: Legal Abstractions and For-Profit Delivery

The categories we use to make sense of the world structure how we act.

In his April 17th column Andre Picard, the health reporter for Toronto’s Globe and Mail newspaper, repeated one the most misleading justifications for more for-profit health care: most of the system is already private. After all, as Picard points out, many . . . → Read More: False positive: private profit in Canada’s health care: Legal Abstractions and For-Profit Delivery