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Dead Wild Roses: Alberta @ Noon: Let’s (*not*) Gut the Public Service

Be it resolved – If the Private Sector is cutting jobs in a economic downturn then the Government of the day should also be cutting Public Sector.

This is my debate point. You won’t find it anywhere in the Alberta@Noon podcast I’m about to link here. I know most of you won’t be thrilled to hear about Alberta’s budget from the finance minister so instead, skip forward to 33:50 of the podcast when two guests, one from the Alberta Taxpayers Federation and one from the Parkland Institute are invited to respond to callers and engage in some (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: It’s a Gas

CCS, what is it good for? Absolutely money. Not for you and I, no, it’s good for oil companies.

We’re talking about this because the only “clean coal” plant isn’t working properly yet, and it opened over a year ago (late). The delay is costing SaskPower customers tens of millions of dollars in penalties to pay to the oil company Cenovus.

SaskWind explains:

350,000 tonnes will be permanently sequestered in Aquistore Aquistore’s own web site describes itself as a “storage site for the world’s first commercial post-combustion CO2 capture, transportation, utilization, and storage project from a coal-fired electrical (Read more…)

Politics, Re-Spun: North America As Caligula

“But I will take questions from Entitlement Weekly magazine staff.”

1. In Alberta, one politician said, “Sorry, we’re not taking questions from political journalists” because, you know.

2. Jeb Bush thinks Supergirl looks “pretty hot.”

Why even bother anymore. Oh right, because while seniors now outnumber kids, millennials outnumber boomers!

 

April 24, 2012 Deconstructing the Wildrose Effect (1) June 11, 2013 Corporate Hypocrites Gone Wild: Syncrude Edition (1) October 10, 2010 Toxic Sludge Is and Isn’t Polluting the Danube: PostMedia (0) October 4, 2010 Rex Murphy: Tar Sands Booster, Dead To Me (6)

. . . → Read More: Politics, Re-Spun: North America As Caligula

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: The Forest For The Trees: Harper’s Fudgey Forestry Figures

I have a feeling that some webpages will be changing significantly in the coming years at the Government of Canada.

“At 0.02% of its forested area, deforestation in Canada is among the world’s lowest” vs. “That means human activities disturbed 20,000 hectares of pristine forest every day [worldwide] for the past 13 years,” the group said.

Of that degradation, more than a fifth — 21.4 per cent — occurred in Canada, the study found. That’s more than any other country. ” That’s 94965000 hectares over those 13 years. At 21.4%, Canada deforested virgin forests covering about 20322510 (Read more…)

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: The Forest For The Trees: Harper’s Fudgey Forestry Figures

I have a feeling that some webpages will be changing significantly in the coming years at the Government of Canada.

“At 0.02% of its forested area, deforestation in Canada is among the world’s lowest” vs. “That means human activities disturbed 20,000 hectares of pristine forest every day [worldwide] for the past 13 years,” the group said.

Of that degradation, more than a fifth — 21.4 per cent — occurred in Canada, the study found. That’s more than any other country. ” That’s 94965000 hectares over those 13 years. At 21.4%, Canada deforested virgin forests covering about 20322510 (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: On credibility blows

Presumably, at some point in the future, the Wildrose Party will run in another Alberta election campaign, with Derek Fildebrandt as one of its candidates.

And plenty of us will have the popcorn ready to see how they try to explain their now-on-the-record belief that it’s somehow a betrayal – rather than a desirable state of affairs – for a government to fulfill its promises.

Bouquets of Gray: Strategic voting in Alberta (recap)

Strategic voting Alberta

Some recent posts on strategic voting in Alberta Strategic voting in Edmonton Riverbend: vote NDP Strategic voting in Edmonton Manning: vote NDP Strategic voting in Edmonton Griesbach: vote NDP Strategic voting in Edmonton Centre: vote NDP

Bill Longstaff: Albertans support stronger climate change policies

A recent survey by EKOS Research Associates commissioned by the Pembina Institute reveals that Albertans’ attitudes about energy and climate change are more progressive than many think.

For example, 50 per cent of Albertans support a carbon tax that applies to all polluters, both companies and individuals (38 per cent oppose the tax). Support rises when the revenue is used for projects that

The Progressive Economics Forum: Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada

This afternoon I gave a presentation at Raising the Roof’s Child & Family Homelessness Stakeholder Summit in Toronto. My slide deck can be downloaded here. To accompany the presentation, I’ve prepared the following list of “Ten Things to Know About Homelessness in Canada.”

1.Efforts to enumerate persons experiencing homeless have generally been spotty, but it is reasonable to assert that homelessness in Canada saw substantial growth in the 1980s and 1990s. On a nightly basis in Toronto, there were about 1,000 persons per night staying in emergency shelters in 1980. By 1990, that figure had doubled. And (Read more…)

The Progressive Economics Forum: Dix Choses à Savoir sur l’Itinérance au Canada

Cet après-midi, j’ai fait une présentation au Child & Family Homelessness Stakeholder Summit, organisé par Chez Toit, à Toronto. Ma presentation, illustrée de diapositives, peut être téléchargée ici. Pour accompagner la présentation, je vous ai préparé la liste suivante des « Dix choses à savoir sur l’itinérance au Canada. »

1. Les tentatives de dénombrer les personnes en situation d’itinérance ont généralement été intermittentes, mais il est raisonnable d’affirmer que l’itinérance au Canada a connu une croissance importante entre 1980 et 2000. Sur une base quotidienne à Toronto, il y avait environ 1,000 personnes par nuit séjournant dans (Read more…)

The Disaffected Lib: Stephen Harper’s Oily Comeuppance

A Saudi prince once said that the Stone Age didn’t end because man ran out of stones.  The Age of Oil may be headed for the same fate.  A Goldman Sachs outlook suggests the price of crude oil will hover around $45 a barrel for the next year or so and could even hit $20.

That’s not good news for self-styled ‘energy superpowers,’ i.e. Canada.  Richard Fantin of Canadian Trends has an insightful report of what’s in store for his province, Alberta, and it makes for grim reading.

Remember when then Liberal leader, Michael Ignatieff, proclaimed Athabasca the (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Wednesday Morning Links

Miscellaneous material for your mid-week reading.

- Jim Stanford, Iglika Ivanova and David MacDonald each highlight how there’s far more to be concerned about in Canada’s economy beyond the GDP dip alone. Both Thomas Walkom and the Star’s editorial board write that it’s clear the Cons have nothing to offer when it comes to trying to improve on our current stagnation, while Balbulican notes that the Cons’ economic message amounts to little more than denial. And David Climenhaga calls out the laughable attempt by Alberta’s right wing to shield Stephen Harper from blame for a decade of failed federal (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Sunday Morning Links

This and that for your Sunday reading.

- Dana Flavelle examines how many Canadians are facing serious economic insecurity. And Kevin Campbell discusses how the Cons are vulnerable on the economy due to their obvious failure to deliver on their promises, as well as their misplaced focus on trickle-down ideology: During this election it is essential to understand that we live in an era of persistent financial insecurity among the majority of the population. Household balance sheets are in a tenuous state throughout the industrialized world, particularly in Canada. This inevitably affects how citizens choose to vote. Healthcare, education, ethics (Read more…)

Alberta Politics: Give a thought to Alberta’s approaching budget day: there’s little to gain and plenty to lose from ‘debt free’ government

PHOTOS: Former premier Ralph Klein, now elevated to sainthood by the neoliberal cargo cult, celebrating the retirement of Alberta’s debt in 2004, never mind the mess the infrastructure was in. Below: Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci, Canadian economist Jim Stanford and Wildrose Finance Critic Derek Fildebrandt, with, bottom, his old debt-trailer. Anyone remember Ralph Klein’s […]

The post Give a thought to Alberta’s approaching budget day: there’s little to gain and plenty to lose from ‘debt free’ government appeared first on Alberta Politics.

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: What Are Market Predictions?

“Mon, Aug 17, 2015 – 8:15 AM Bill Baruch, chief market strategist, iiTrader joins BNN to discuss why he’s watching crude oil to move sharply higher today.” “oil will rally today” is the BNN video title, but I didn’t hear the trader say that, but he did say a rally by midweek. In the video he notes $35 oil is realistic in the near term (which was actually a better prediction), and it will be unlikely to rebound to $60 if production levels stay similar to now.

How far are we from $30 oil? http://t.co/A1CW1aOkcn @iiTRADERbill @BNN #crudeoil

(Read more…)

Environmental Law Alert Blog: What is climate leadership in BC, Canada and the world?

Thursday, August 20, 2015

The governments of both British Columbia and Alberta are currently consulting the public as they develop “climate leadership plans.” But what does it really take to be a climate leader? Let’s take a moment to reflect on what climate leadership means and to acknowledge some recent examples, and to consider what that means for BC's promise of climate leadership.

The governments of both British Columbia and Alberta are currently consulting the public as they develop “climate leadership plans.” Here in BC the deadline for email submissions has been extended to September 14th.

read more

. . . → Read More: Environmental Law Alert Blog: What is climate leadership in BC, Canada and the world?

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Stephen Marche discusses the Cons’ ongoing efforts to make Canada a more closed and ignorant country: Mr. Harper’s campaign for re-election has so far been utterly consistent with the personality trait that has defined his tenure as prime minister: his peculiar hatred for sharing information.

Americans have traditionally looked to Canada as a liberal haven, with gun control, universal health care and good public education.

But the nine and half years of Mr. Harper’s tenure have seen the slow-motion erosion of that reputation for open, responsible government. His stance has been a know-nothing (Read more…)

Bill Longstaff: Ceci forced to slap Harper’s wrist

In the midst of this tiresomely long election campaign, Stephen Harper appears to find attacking his NDP and Liberal opponents isn’t enough to occupy his time. He has decided to pick fights with a couple of provinces as well, recently assailing the Alberta government for raising taxes and not coming down with a budget.

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley had previously responded to Harper’s barbs

Bill Longstaff: Linda McCuaig does us all a big favour

Last week the NDP candidate for Toronto Centre, Linda McQuaig, stirred the tar sands pot, telling a CBC panel discussion that for Canada to meet its climate change targets, “a lot of the oil sands oil may have to stay in the ground.” As an Albertan, I suppose I am supposed to be offended at this slighting of our precious sands. Or perhaps as a Dipper I should be concerned that she has undermined

Left Over: A Prophet Is Always Without Honour In Their Own Country….

NDP candidate Linda McQuaig’s comment on oilsands stirs up hornet’s nest Linda McQuaig says ‘a lot of the oilsands oil may have to stay in the ground,’ in calling for environment

The Canadian Press Posted: Aug 09, 2015 10:25 AM ET Last Updated: Aug 09, 2015 11:51 AM ET

 

 

Gee, a politician telling the truth, for once.Mulcair would do well to bring her to the forefront once he has been elected PM. Yes it’s tough news on oil sands jobs, mortgages in Alberta, etc. Try getting some sympathy from those who have lost everything in other sectors, (Read more…)

ParliamANT Hill: Cantada election 2015: PM proposes banning travel to extremist hotspots

Satire inspired by this headline: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/harper-proposes-travel-restrictions-1.3184703

Saskboy's Abandoned Stuff: Oil Is Not A Four Letter Word

Coal is a four letter word, however.

Perhaps Wall is a bit touchy about fossil fuels because Saskatchewan produces more greenhouse gases per person than any other Canadian province [link added], and is one of only three provinces whose emissions have risen since 1990. The province contains only 1 per cent of the country’s population, but produces a disproportionate 10 per cent of national emissions.

Saskatchewan recorded the highest deposit-paid bottle return rate in Canada (82 per cent) and largest wildfire detection camera system in North America, said the ministry.

Yet we had the worst wildfire season, perhaps (Read more…)

Accidental Deliberations: Saturday Morning Links

Assorted content for your weekend reading.

- Barbara Tasch writes about the IMF’s latest research on growing inequality in developing and developed countries alike. And Michael Krassa and Benjamin Radcliff study the impact an improved minimum wage can have on economic well-being: Simply stated, as the minimum wage increases, the economic wellbeing of the national population rises. Statistically speaking this relationship is a strong one, significant at the .001 level.… Here’s the bottom line: Regardless of the size of a country’s economy, its current economic situation, or the time frame chosen, people lead better lives as the minimum wage increases.

(Read more…)

Politics and its Discontents: Why Isn’t This Getting Wider Coverage?

While this story seems most timely and relevant, given the ongoing Council of the Federation meeting discussing pipeline growth, I couldn’t even find a reference to it in this morning’s Toronto Star. It should be front-page news.

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Bill Longstaff: I know you have to say that stuff, Rachel, but still ….

At a recent speech to international investors in Calgary, Alberta Premier Rachel Notley described the tar sands as “a tremendous asset” and an “international showpiece.” Hearing my premier and the leader of my party describe the tar sands as a tremendous asset makes me cringe. They are indeed an international showpiece, but not the kind we should be bragging about.

Ms. Notley is a very bright